Community News & Updates October 2015


51+sb3Zv9WL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is pleased to announce the release of Shepherd’s Crook, her fourth Animals in Focus mystery from Midnight Ink. Her essay “A Question of Corvids” will also appear this month in the 2015 Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology edited by Rebecca Skloot, and her poem “Spin” will be appear in 27 Views of Wilmington, also being released in October by Eno Publishers. Sheila will be giving a reading with several other North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship recipients in Wilmington on October 4th, and as part of a “release slam” for 27 Views on October 24.

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W’12) short story “Taking My Time” appeared in The New Haven Review.


Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “What the Dollhouse Said” will be in a forthcoming episode of Pseudopod! She’s so excited! She’s been an avid listener for four years and has every episode on Podisc. Her micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will be reprinted in a forthcoming edition of Bosley Gravel’s Cavalcade of Terror. Her story “The Scarlet Cloak,” from her Stonecoast thesis, will be reprinted in the December 1 issue of Luna Station Quarterly, a speculative fiction magazine featuring stories by emerging women authors. She is using skills she learned writing Stonecoast homework to create book reviews and editorials for the magazine Mothership Zeta, which debuts October 15 with its first issue (she is the nonfiction editor, alumna Mur Lafferty is the editor-in-chief). Issue 0, featuring book reviews from Stonecoast faculty Liz Hand and short story reviews from alum Bonnie Stufflebeam is already available for free download at Issue 1 will feature a short story by Bonnie and a “Story Doctor” analysis of why her story works so brilliantly by faculty James Patrick Kelly, as well as a “Favorite 2014-2015 Graphic Novels” review by alum Adam Gallardo. Karen is thrilled to be working with so many talented people!!!!

The Big Rewind CoverLibby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction S’10) debut novel The Big Rewind (William Morrow) received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, who called it “A mystery that will inspire more than one playlist and, hopefully, a sequel.” The book is slated for release on February 2, 2016.

A short film written by Adam Kreutz Gallardo (Popular Fiction, S’12), Monster Movie, is an official selection at this year’s McMinnville Short Film Festival on October 3rd. The film is based on his novel, Zomburbia.


Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) piece “Coming Out” is listed as a notable essay in the 2015 volume of Best American Essays, edited by Ariel Levy. The piece originally appeared in Fourth Genre, fall 2014.

9780373211722_BB.inddLexa Hillyer (Poetry, S’10) was named producer on a forthcoming TV show from WBTV based on Legacy of Kings by Eleanor Herman, the first book in a series she created, plotted and edited with her literary company Paper Lantern Lit. Read more here.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold his short story “Snowbirds” to Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Authors Bill Roorbach, Susan Conley, and Meredith Hall will discuss the “Joys & Challenges of Writing Fiction, Non-fiction, & Memoir,” moderated by Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ’11) on October 18, 2015, from 1:00-4:00 p.m. Open to the public. Authors will have books for signing. Contact Laurie Skillings: for location and directions.

Karen Pullen‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) short story “#grenadegranny” is included in the Bouchercon 2015 anthology Murder Under the Oaks, edited by Art Taylor and published by Down & Out. The anthology will be available after Bouchercon, the world’s biggest mystery fan convention, in Raleigh, NC, on October 8-11. Her second mystery novel, Cold Heart, has been accepted by Five Star Cengage for publication in August 2016.

Marian Romero‘s (Popular Fiction, S’15) story “Ruta Lato and the Ghost of the Revolution” will be appearing in Betwixt this month.

AOY+poster+WEBAll Our Yesterdays, a new film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W ’07), begins its festival run with an October 18th premiere at HorrorQuest Film Festival in Atlanta, Georgia, just in time for Halloween.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s (Popular fiction, S’13) “Sleeping With Spirits” is due to appear in Motherzhip Zeta, the new magazine edited by fellow Stonecoasters Mur Lafferty and Karen Bovenmyer, on October 15; this story was written for a Stonecoast humor workshop with James Patrick Kelly and Aaron Hamburger. Her roundup of the best short fiction of 2014 was in their Issue 0, available for free download at Her dark fantasy story “A Careful Fire” will appear in Beneath Ceaseless Skies this month. Her poem “The Werewolf” has been reprinted in Tony Barnstone and Michelle Mitchell-Foust’s Monster Verse anthology.

Growing a New TailLisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry, S’04) first collection of short fiction launched in Ireland on September 3rd (Pearse Street Library in Dublin) and September 5th (Charlie Byrne’s Book Shop in Galway). Ted and Annie Deppe were among the attendees at the Galway reading. It will launch in the United States on November 14, 2015, at the Mansfield Center Library in Mansfield, CT. See for details of her upcoming readings. Here is a link to one of the early reviews of the book (even though it says it was released in January, this is incorrect; the book was published in Ireland in August). This collection should be widely available by mid-November. Lisa looks forward to reading in Maine, perhaps in December or January.


51WzKfO4hIL._SX343_BO1,204,203,200_Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) poem “Bride” appears in the new anthology Monster Verse: Human and Inhuman Poems, edited by Tony Barnstone and Michelle Mitchell-Foust.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) will give a reading for Old Dominion University’s 38th Annual Literary Festival at 12:30 p.m. on 8 October at the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center, Virginia Beach, VA.

Vivas to Those Who Have Failed CoverMartín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new collection of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January.

Crimson Peak novelization cvrNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new book out on October 15: the official novelization for the new Guillermo del Toro movie, Crimson Peak. She was approved by del Toro and attended a private screening at Legendary Pictures with some VIPs from Universal Studios. Both the movie and book will come out in mid-October. “In Arkham Town Where I was Bound,” a Lovecraftian story narrated by Edgar Allan Poe received an honorable mention in Ellen Datlow’s Year’s Best Horror of the Year Volume 7. Nancy read the story last winter at Stonecoast.

October 14-25, Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Best Enemies will be staged at the Studio Theater at Portland Stage, 25A Forest Ave, Portland ME. Two cowboys, lone survivors of a sabotaged rodeo cruise, are marooned together on a tiny desert island. To preserve their sanity, they’ve invented imaginary geography and instituted a system of laws, but ultimately they go to war over their shared cowboy hat. The Portland Phoenix called the Best Enemies “A sly, haunting, and remarkably fun new existential comedy . . . nimble, irreverent, and immensely entertaining,” and The Portsmouth Herald described it as “Smart, funny, poignant and creepy.” Tickets available for purchase here.

Best EnemiesDavid Mura (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) published his essay, “Asian Americans: The Front & Back of the Bus” in the anthology A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry & Race. He was guest blogger for the Gulf Coast Literary Journal (his own blog is He’s just completed a book of essays on creative writing and is finishing up his book of essays on race. His conversations on race and the arts with Minnesota artists can be found on youtube and his conversation with Stonecoast faculty member Alexs Pate is also on the Minnesota Public Radio website.



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Community News & Updates September 2015


Quenton Baker‘s (Poetry, S’12) first chapbook, Diglossic in the Second America, is now available from Punch Press. You can hear him read two of the poems in recent radio segment with Washington State poet laureate Elizabeth Austen.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) has been honored with a 2015-16 fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council to support creation of new work. In addition, Sheila has been granted a two-week residency at the Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities in Southern Pines, NC in December. Just before the fellowship news arrived, Sheila had made the difficult decision to decline an offer for two more books in her mystery series to devote time to nonfiction, and she feels well rewarded. They say “follow the money,” but sometimes you have to follow your heart.

Letters to TiptreeKaren Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Bosley Gravel’s Cavalcade of Terror.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) is very happy to see her creative non-fiction essay “Deception in Six Parts” published in the new collection Letters to Tiptree, celebrating the life of famed science fiction writer James Tiptree Jr. (a.k.a. former military officer Alice B. Sheldon). Four of Sandra’s short stories since her graduation from Stonecoast have received Tiptree Award Honor List mentions.

The Girl in the MirrorConstance McKee (Fiction, W’13) is pleased to announce that on September 3 her debut novel, The Girl in the Mirror, will be released by Deeds Publishing. Special thanks to Suzanne Strempek Shea, Boman Desai, and Ted Deppe for the tutelage that led to the completion of this book.

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction, S’15) had a story published by Guernica Magazine & PEN American simultaneously. PEN says: “The Guernica/PEN Flash Series is a collaborative effort in which both journals publish the best flash out there.”

Robert Ortiz (Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, S’14) is happy to announce his new job as an English Affiliate Instructor at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Love Songs of CarbonJanet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) ironed cloth sculpture Sleep is featured on the cover of U.K. poet Philip Gross’s latest poetry collection Love Songs of Carbon, just released by Bloodaxe Books. Love Songs of Carbon closes with the poem “Thirteen Ways to Fold the Darkness,” which was inspired by Sleep. Sleep is in the collection of the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas, Austin, gift of Laurence Miller, 2015.

“Manhandled,” by Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12), will be published in the September 2015 issue of New Ohio Review. It is an essay about sexual assault in the Alaskan wilderness and is part of her memoir-in-progress.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has been asked to contribute an essay on Bill Gaston’s The Good Body for a critical anthology on Hockey Literature to be edited by noted Canadian writers and scholars, Jamie Dopp and Angie Abdou.

Michaela Roessner (Popular Fiction, S’08) has a short story, “Flattened,” included in Western Weird, this year’s Manifest West anthology. The anthology will be out at the end of August. The art catalog for Viktor Koen’s photomontage bestiary is now published and includes Roessner’s ekphrastic accompaniment, “Mormo,” along with the works of other contributing writers.

PenelopePenelope Anne Schwartz (f/k/a Penelope Schwartz Robinson; Creative Nonfiction, S’04) has recently published two new books of nonfiction: Penelope: Weaving and Unraveling, a Writing and Revising Life, a memoir of her writing life from 1970-2014; and When Lilacs Last, the McLaughlin Garden, an historical biography of Bernard McLaughlin, the “Dean of Maine Gardeners.” Her essay collection Slippery Men was chosen by Katha Pollitt for the Stonecoast Book Prize and published by New Rivers Press in 2009. Schwartz lives in Arcata, California, and teaches in the English Department of the College of the Redwoods in Eureka.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) will be reading with poet Carmen Mandley and current Stonecoast student Elisha Webster Emerson at LFK, 188A State St, Portland, Maine on September 7, 2015. Drinks at 8:00 p.m., readings start at 9:00 p.m.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) horror story—and her first Stonecoast-workshopped story!—“The Devil’s Hands” appeared in the most recent issue of Black Static. Her Little Mermaid retelling “Sisters” appeared in Scheherazade’s Bequest. Her flash fiction “No Eyes” appeared in Psychopomp. And another flash fiction,”Mrs. Stiltskin,” was reprinted in audio version in Podcastle.

Growing a New TailGrowing a New Tail, Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, S’04) debut collection of short fiction, will launch in Ireland in September and in the U.S. in late October. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press. Watch the book trailer here:

Marco Wilkinson‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lyric memoir, Madder, which was his Stonecoast thesis, was a semi-finalist for the Cleveland State University 2015 Essay Collection Prize.

In late June, Anne Witty (Poetry, W’12) “published” a work that could best be described as a 4,400-square-foot three-dimensional book. The occasion was the grand opening of a new permanent exhibition for Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut. Entitled “Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers,” the exhibit looks at the impact of the whaling industry on American history and culture. It features objects, still and moving images, short explanatory texts, excerpts from literature, poetry (including an excerpt from Tony Barnstone’s  “Parable in Praise of Violence”), song, underwater sound, computer interactives, and much more. The project crowns Mystic Seaport’s many years’ work to restore and sail the last remaining American whaleship, the Charles W. Morgan (built in 1841), with an in-depth look at whaling’s continued effects on America. Creating museum exhibits, like creating books, requires many different skills. Anne’s freelance work as Guest Curator included writing, research, guiding object and image selection, and consultation in other areas (including an appearance in the exhibit’s orientation film). Other team members contributed 3-D design, graphics design, computer interactives, song and sound recordings, special expertise on whales and American whaling history, design and construction coordination, and many other pieces of the three-dimensional puzzle. If any Stonecoasters are interested in learning more about script-writing for exhibits and its kinship with screenwriting and other forms of non-fiction and fiction, please get in touch with Anne at witty[at]


Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has sold the fourth Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, to St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan, with audio rights to the third and fourth novels going to Blackstone Audio. All four books have also been sold in Sweden. Liz’s most recent reviews include Austin Grossman’s Crooked, and Ann and Jeff Vandermeer’s Sisters of the Revolution, both for The Los Angeles Times.

Demons of the HellmouthNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is proud to announce that she has helped Rupert Giles, who served as the Watcher of Vampire Slayer Buffy Summers, take his newest book to publication. Demons of the Hellmouth: A Guide for Slayers (Titan Books) will debut September 29. Giles’s dear friend, the actor Anthony Stewart Head, wrote the introduction.

The latest installment of Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) column in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine “Welcome to Asimov’s” profiles ten new writers who have recently made their first sale to Asimov’s. His oft-reprinted story “Think Like A Dinosaur” has been selected to be translated for a new and as yet unnamed anthology that will introduce contemporary North American science fiction to the readers in Cuba. Jim plans to visit Cuba in the spring of 2016.

duck and cover--2015-with WB & PR bannerMike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover has been nominated for 8 “Desert Star Awards” in Palm Springs, CA, including “Outstanding Production: Comedy.” For those in the northeast, Duck and Cover will open September 4 at The Players’ Ring Theatre (Portsmouth, NH) and run through Sept 20th. Duck and Cover is about a sheltered American family in 1962 suburbia trying to hold on to its innocence in the era of civil rights riots, birth control pills, rock ‘n’ roll, and an unexpected visit from closeted jazz trumpeter Uncle Bunny and his African-American band-mate and partner on the night that the Cuban Missile Crisis begins. Duck and Cover received the 2014 John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award (New England Theatre Conference) and was also awarded “Best Play” at the Northern Writes Festival (Penobscot Theatre Co, Bangor, Maine) and “Audience Favorite” at the Dezart Performs Festival of New Plays (Palm Springs, CA). The Players’ Ring Theatre has intimate, three-quarter-round seating for 70 (general admission), so reservations are encouraged.

Benedict_Hair_pbkflps_comp.inddElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an essay in the new anthology: Me, My Hair and I: Twenty-Seven Women Untangle an Obsession, released in September 2015 from Algonquin Books, edited by Liz Benedict. Elizabeth’s essay—“Act-Tresses: Hair as Performance Art”—has just been published on the online literary magazine, Solstice. Elizabeth will be reading from the anthology with Liz Benedict at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA, on October 5th. For other upcoming readings and events see

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Community News & Updates August 2015


Alums with a special interest in creative writing pedagogy may apply for a teaching apprenticeship. Apprentices will work closely with a workshop leader, contact students with workshop updates, assign readings, and review student reading responses and evaluations. Apprentices must also teach one seminar on teaching/pedagogy and are asked to read during the Faculty Flash Reading.

Apprentices will receive a travel stipend ($300.00 maximum) and lodging with lunches during summer residencies.


  • Graduate of the Stonecoast MFA program.
  • Demonstrate a strong commitment to excellence in teaching.
  • Demonstrate good communication skills and ability to works with diverse groups

How to Apply: Interested alums must submit the following by DECEMBER 15, 2015:

  • Cover Letter
  • Current curriculum vitae
  • One letter of support
  • One-page statement of teaching philosophy.
  • Seminar proposal

Decisions will be made in consultation with faculty advisory board and based in part on the applicant’s teaching strategies and presentation proposal. Applications materials are due by December 15, 2015. Materials received on or after that date will be considered at the discretion of the Associate Director. Interested Stonecoast alums should submit hard-copy materials packets to:

Robin Talbot
University of Southern Maine
Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing
98 Bedford Street
Portland, Maine 04103

Alumni who would like to return to Maine or Ireland for an additional residency experience can participate in the residency, which will include two workshops, attending seminars and interacting with mentors. Approximate Cost: $900.00 – $1125.00 plus lodging

The fifth semester option allows alums to opt for an additional semester of mentorship with a Stonecoast faculty member to further polish a book manuscript or collection of poems. This option starts with a full residency followed by enrollment in a six month semester. Cost: Current Tuition Rate


Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) recently sold his second novel, Sky Is Over, to Medallion Press. He worked on the novel extensively during his time at Stonecoast, eventually using a version of the novel for his thesis. Eric would like to thank all his fellow students and former instructors, especially Michael Kimball, for their help with the novel. Sky Is Over will be released in June of 2017.

Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “What the Dollhouse Said” will be reprinted in a forthcoming edition of Evil Girlfriend Media Shorts, and a new micro fiction titled “Left Behind,” which is a twist on a werewolf tale, will appear in the Quick Shivers in the Midwest from the Volume Four anthology.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) was awarded a scholarship from Upstreet. A Literary Magazine to the 20th Annual Postgraduate Writers’ Conference at Vermont College of Fine Arts. The scholarship is awarded to current or past contributors to the magazine. Linda’s essay “Becoming Memory” appeared in Upstreet 8 in 2012. It was listed as a Notable Essay in Best American Essays 2013. FYI: She pretty much boiled her Stonecoast thesis down to this one essay. This fall, her essay “Space Heart” will appear in Solstice Literary Magazine. Over this past year, Linda has had residencies at Landfall Trust in Brigus, Newfoundland; Vermont Center Studios in Johnson, Vermont; and Obras Foundation in Portugal. She is currently working on a collection of flash fiction about boomer women.

Marie Hannan-Mandel’s (Popular Fiction, ’07) short story “The Perfect Pitch” was chosen for the Malice Domestic anthology 11 Murder Most Conventional. It will be published to coincide with the Malice Domestic Conference in April 2016. Her short story “Sisters, Sisters” will appear in the anthology Adirondack Mysteries 3, which will be published in 2016.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) is joining Obsidian Entertainment as a full-time Narrative Designer. Obsidian’s past projects include Pillars of Eternity and Fallout: New Vegas. He’ll be writing branching dialogue, character arcs, and story/world content for video games in development. You can learn more about Obsidian’s current and upcoming projects at


HurricaneCVREllen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) and civil liberties attorney Bill Newman will present a reading and conversation, “Disappeared in America: Imagination and Fact,” at the Wellfleet Public Library on Wednesday, August 26 at 7:30 p.m. After Meeropol reads from On Hurricane Island, her novel set at a fictional domestic detention center in Maine, Newman will discuss the realities of domestic interrogation and detention.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’11) will be performing in Toronto’s International Festival of Authors this October, in support of her inclusion in the anthology Best Canadian Poetry 2015. Her next book, Let the Empire Down, is slated for Spring 2016 release from Biblioasis.

A new piece by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), “Must Love Horses, Must Love Dogs,” appeared on the essay site Full Grown People. In August, Lisa will be presenting at HippoCamp15: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA.

coverCatherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) is pleased to announce the release of The President’s Salmon: Restoring the King of Fish and its Home Waters from Down East Books.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) is thrilled to announce the September 8th release of her novel, In the Context of Love, published by Buddhapuss Ink, LLC, a manuscript written in first person/second person address that she worked on while at Stonecoast. Bonnie Jo Campbell, National Book Award Finalist, author of American Salvage and Once Upon a River, says: “Linda K. Sienkiewicz’s powerful and richly detailed debut novel is at once at love story, a cautionary tale, and anContext-of-Love-Cover-high-res inspirational journey. In the Context of Love should be required reading for all wayward teenage girls—and their mothers, too.” You can view the trailer Linda created herself at here. You can preorder/purchase the book on Amazon. Linda’s website is

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) is pleased to announce that he has signed with literary agent Victoria Sanders of Victoria Sanders & Associates.


Theodora Goss‘s (Popular Fiction) essay “The Fin-de-Siècle Monster” was published in the second issue of Story, which focuses on the monster in all its manifestations. A letter of hers appeared in Letters to Tiptree, a compilation of letters to James Tiptree, Jr., from female fantasy and science fiction writers published by Twelfth Planet Press.  Her story “Cimmeria: From the Journal of Imaginary Anthropology” was reprinted in two year’s best anthologies: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Nine, edited by Jonathan Strahan (Solaris), and The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasy: 2015, edited by Rich Horton (Prime Books).

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has sold The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel, to St. Martin’s Press.  Her recent reviews include Crooked and Sisters of the Revolution for the Los Angeles Times.

unnamedNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is signing her story “Another Little Piece of My Heart” in Midian Unmade: Tales of Clive Barker’s Nightbreed at Dark Delicacies Bookstore in Burbank, California, on August 1 at 2:00 p.m. She is also signing the following day, August 2, at 2:00 p.m. at Mysterious Galaxy Bookstore in San Diego.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) multi-award-winning play Duck and Cover will be staged at The Players’ Ring (Portsmouth, NH) Sept 4-20 (Fri, Sat, Sun). The theater has intimate, three-quarter round seating for 70, so please book tickets in advance if you plan to attend.

duck and cover--0222bEléna Rivera (Poetry) is reading at Unnamable Books (600 Vanderbilt Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238 | 718-789-1534) with Linda Russo and E. J. MacAdams on August 15, 2015, at  7:00 p.m.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera had a sold-out extended run at the New York Musical Festival in July 2015, drawing national and international media, including a feature interview with Elizabeth on, the online People magazine. An AFP news service feature on the show appeared in over 200 countries in Europe and Asia and was a “trending story” in France. The rock opera drew enthusiastic NYC reviews. Broadway World spotlighted it as a PhotoFlash feature. Ken Davenport’s Producer’s Perspective blog listed the show as one of five “that stand out” at NYMF and Playbill and Backstage both cited it as one of the “Top Ten Shows to See.” Tonya & Nancy’s Liz McCartney won Outstanding Featured Actress at NYMF 2015. Best of Off Broadway listed it as a Best of Fest. Elizabeth thanks Stonecoasters for their online and offline support! Check out the website for news on future productions.

Tracy McDowell as 'Tonya' and Jenna Leigh Green as 'Nancy' in Elizabeth Searle's 'sold out' New York Musical Festival run of Tonya & Nancy, the Rock Opera (music by Michael Teoli)

Tracy McDowell as ‘Tonya’ and Jenna Leigh Green as ‘Nancy’ in Elizabeth Searle’s ‘sold out’ New York Musical Festival run of Tonya & Nancy: the Rock Opera (music by Michael Teoli)



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Community News & Updates July 2015


MCI-Cover-Framed-FullSizeKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) could not be more thrilled to have two poems “Cadaver Feet” and “Little Bone Robot Boy” appearing in Meercat Press’s My Cruel Invention poetry anthology. “Cadaver Feet” was written for Bonnie Stufflebeam’s Art & Words show and a wonderful painting of the same name was created by Antonio Lanza to match it—both of which Karen included in her Stonecoast thesis. “Little Bone Robot Boy” was drafted at the Summer 2013 Stonecoast residency, during the writing exercise Bonnie gave us in her graduating presentation on Art & Words, and is based on an awesome painting by Antonio called The Pugilist. More of Antonio’s work can be viewed here. Karen would like to add that Art & Words is super fun and you all should consider participating next year! Karen is thrilled to be participating this fall and is currently drafting a story to accompany work by visual artist Jackson Zorn. A shortened version of her Devilfish Review story, “What the Dollhouse Said,” is being illustrated by another participant and she can’t wait to see the results! Her poem “Pseudopod” will appear in the July issue of Abyss & Apex Magazine. This poem is a pantoum inspired by sympathies for the Dunwich Horror in Lovecraft’s tale of the same name. Karen couldn’t be more excited to be appearing in the Hugo-nominated Abyss & Apex, which has also published cover-discoveryStonecoaster Marian Rosarum’s “A portrait of the witch at sixteen.” Also, her flash fiction “Scavengers” will appear in Queer Sci Fi’s Discovery anthology (Mischief Corner Books), which will be available July 10. Eighty-five percent of the profits go directly to supporting diverse voices in SF and this anthology includes over one hundred 300-word stories. If you like micro-fiction and LGBTQ themes, check it out! From the editors: “Within the covers of this book, you’ll find a platypus shifter, a trans-affirming leprechaun, a pissed off unicorn, a green pickup truck with another world in its glove compartment, and a bunch of other miniature adventures—each only 300 words long.”

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) has been invited to join a group of visual artists at the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts “Pentaculum” event in January 2016. She hopes to work on a collaborative ekphrastic project with a number of the fellow artists in residence. The Pentaculum is a weeklong invitational artist residency and retreat experience in the heart of Gatlinburg, TN.

static1.squarespaceLexa Hillyer‘s (Poetry, S’10) debut young adult novel, Proof of Forever, which has been called “The Sisterhood of the (Time) Traveling Pants for a new generation,” released on June 2nd from HarperCollins.

The manuscript of Malissa Kent‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) fantasy novel Lark’s Flight, which many Stonecoasters had a hand in workshopping, is a finalist in the Pacific Northwest Writers Association Literary Contest. Malissa will be attending the PNWA conference in Seattle in mid-July to talk with agents and editors.

Janet Passehl’s (Poetry, S’10) first poetry collection, Clutching Lambs, has just been published by Negative Capability Press. Clutching Lambs is available on, Amazon, and on the publisher’s website.


Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04), as editor, and New Rivers Press, as publisher, have been awarded the Gold Medal by MIPA (the Midwestern Independent Publishers Association) for the 2014 issue of American Fiction. This is the first time that an anthology has won in the Short Fiction/Anthology category.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that this summer is looking busy. His short story “Scander and the Red Briar Prince” is now available through Rose Red Review. Next month, “Minotaur: An Analysis of the Species” will be available through Unlikely Story, while “The Blue Tigress Deams” will be out through The Colored Lens. As always, you can follow him (infrequently) on Twitter @Kesterian.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S ’08) ​has a new ​nonfiction ​piece in the June issue of Hippocampus Magazine, “Going ​Through Your Things/Superhero.” At BooksNJ in June, Lisa appeared on a panel about writing groups and ran a mini-workshop on expressing character emotions.

Lightspeed_61_June_2015Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) superhero story “Trickier With Each Translation” appeared in the Lightspeed: Queers Destroy Science Fiction special issue, available for purchase. Her original fairy tale “The Girl with Golden Hair” appeared in Beneath Ceaseless Skies. She and her partner Peter Brewer also released today the first track of their collaborative words-music album Strange Monsters on Kickstarter, where they’re raising the funds to pay for production of the project.

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’014) published the story “Good Behavior” in the online magazine Perihelion SF.


9780393249033_300Martín Espada (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) was featured in the March/April issue of the American Poetry Review. His collection of poems Vivas to Those Who Have Failed is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January 2016.

Wylding Hall, the new novella by Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction), is available as a full-cast audiobook on Audible and will be released in a hardcover edition this month from PS Publishing.

James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Oneness: Triptych” composed of three interrelated flash fiction pieces he wrote while teaching workshops (two at Stonecoast!) appears in the July/August issue of the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Meanwhile, in the reprint department, his story “Someday” has just been reprinted in The Year’s Best Science Fiction Thirty-Second Annual Edition, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press, and his story “La Casa di Bernardo” (“Bernardo’s House”) has been translated into Italian and reprinted in Storie dal domani edited by Francesco Verso from Mincione Edizioni.

As Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera heads to NYC in the New York Musical Festival, it has drawn national and international media, including in the New York Daily News, the UK Telegraph, Hollywood Reporter, an interview on 1010WINS Radio in NYC, Playbill, Seattle Times, The Times in South Africa, in Australia, Broadway World, Theater Mania, with stories forthcoming in France and on, the online version of People Magazine. Jamie Frevele, on the national website Mediaite, wrote: “The saga of Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding is being turned into the rock opera it deserves…That is insane and wonderful and it’s about damn time it willed its way into existence!…This is beautiful and perfect, and you’re just upset that you didn’t think of it first. Tonya & Nancy: the Rock Opera will be produced at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) July 9, 11, 12, 14 and 16; opening night is already sold out; tickets are on sale here. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera were performed on June 25 at a showcase for NYMF, at Broadway Mondays on June 29, and will be performed at Broadway Sessions at the Laurie Beechman Theater on July 2 at 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. There will also be showcase events at Hardware bar on June 29th, Therapy bar on July 1st, and a Songwriters’ Showcase event on July 15 at the Musical Theater Factory.

Tonya & Nancy






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Community News & Updates June 2015


Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) drabble about an unfortunate house cat entitled “What Dolls Eat” will appear in The Were-Traveler in late May/early June. She is most pleased the editor called it “damn creepy” in her acceptance letter.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) published a short story “A Song For You” on Motherboard themed from the Donny Hathaway song of the same name and the myth of Orpheus. Her novel Elysium has been placed on the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Honor List and is a Finalist for the Locus Award for Best First Novel.

808_largeJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Re’em Song” is now available in issue 258 of Interzone. Turns out so is Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Doors.” This is almost more fun than one Stonecoast writer can handle—thankfully there are two of them to handle the load.

Hank Garfield (Fiction, S’04) will present a paper entitled “Madmen on the Water: The Golden Globe Singlehanded Sailboat Race of 1968-69 and Robert Stone’s Outerbridge Reach at the annual Sport Literature Association conference June 28 in Johnson City, Tennessee. See Hank’s blog, Slower Traffic, on walking, bicycling and not owning a car, at

Bone SongBunny Goodjohn‘s (Poetry, W’07) first poetry collection, Bone Song, launches at the downtown YWCA in Lynchburg on June 18th at 7:15 p.m. Bone Song won the 2014 Liam Rector Prize and includes a jacket blurb from the rather fabulous Baron Wormser. The collection is available at Amazon; however, signed copies with free positive energy may be ordered from Bunny’s Etsy store.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is proud to announce that her first book, a collection of micro-essays called Postcards from Here, will be released by Vine Leaves Press in 2016. Some pieces from the book have been previously published, and curious people can read online excerpts here and here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Short Nonfiction for her lyric essay “Saudade,” which was first published in The Stonecoast Review. She thanks Review editors Alexandria DelCourt, Alexis Paige, and others for helping to improve the piece. A shorter version was published this month in Hippocampus Magazine and is available here. Earlier this month, Lesley had a review/essay inspired by Los Angeles writer Wendy C. Ortiz’s second memoir, Hollywood Notebook, up on The Rumpus.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a book trailer for his debut poetry collection, Drift.

The High Cost of Flowers by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) won the best literary fiction award and the best contemporary fiction award in the 2014 Midwest Book Awards held April 13. This was the 25th anniversary of the awards with books submitted by independent, small, and academic presses in a twelve-state region. The High Cost of Flowers was released by Calumet Editions.

0615asimovs_smWill Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11) appears in the July 2015 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction with “Acres of Perhaps.”

Mary Heather Noble‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) essay “Reintroduction” is featured in Issue 7: Wilderness of Minerva Rising. She will be participating in the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, this month, and will be working with acclaimed environmental writer Scott Russell Sanders. Mary Heather has also been invited as a writer-in-residence for PLAYA’s “Beyond Creating: A Climate of Change,” an Art + Ecology themed artist retreat that fosters collaboration among artists and scientists around environmental issues. PLAYA is a nonprofit organization based in Summer Lake, Oregon, that supports innovative thinking through work in the arts, literature, natural sciences and other fields of creative inquiry.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction (New Rivers Press)—an annual anthology of the best new fiction from established and emerging writers, edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04)—has just been awarded the Midwest Independent Publishers Association award for Fiction: Short Story/Anthology, the first time an anthology has won the top prize. Former Stonecoast Director Lee Hope is one of the authors in the anthology, and founding faculty member Michael C White was the finalist and prize-awarding judge. He read the submissions blind. Submissions for the 2016 are being accepted through Submittable. Details are available at the New Rivers Press web site.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essay “Your Boyfriend’s Back” appears in the May issue of Front Porch. Lisa will present at HippoCamp 15, Hippocampus Magazine’s creative nonfiction conference in August. A preview of her session is at their blog.

Kara L. Storti’s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Indigo in D-Town, will be released in Spring 2016 by CarolRhoda Lab, a division of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about charming but tortured Phineas “Finn” Walt, a seventeen-year-old drug dealer who develops an unexpected friendship with an 80-year-old addict. Together they harvest and deal an unknown drug that transports the user to a favorite memory after which a “souvenir” appears from the past. The drug “hippo” is miraculous, highly addictive, and threatens to ruin Finn’s life by dredging up horrific childhood memories, tumbling him further into heroin abuse, and involving a psychopathic drug king out for blood.

51K-wdh5TxL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) is honored to have her essay “An Internship at New Rivers Press” included in the 50th Anniversary publication of New Rivers Press titled Paper Camera. This edition is published as a celebration of the enduring quality of the small press in the face of an ever-increasing pressure by other modes of publication in the writing world. The contents are intended to highlight the dynamic range of material considered by New Rivers Press as noteworthy of finding its way into print.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) is the winner of the New Works Competition at Hugo House for a flash fiction story, “Mosaic.” She will read alongside Meg Wolitzer, Justin Torres, and Amelia Gray in Seattle the end of May. Growing a New Tail, Lisa’s debut collection of short fiction, will launch late summer 2015 and in September in Dublin and Galway. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press.

Julie L. Vandekreke‘s (formerly Scharf; Creative Nonfiction, S’10) poem “Transparent” is forthcoming in the June 2015 edition of Mused: Bella Online Literary Review.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her full-length poetry manuscript, Pierce & Brand’s World of Dangerous Wonders, is currently a semifinalist in the 2015 Negative Capability Press Book Competition. In addition, her chapbook manuscript, Imperative, is currently a semifinalist in YesYes Books’ 2015 Vinyl 45s Chapbook Contest.

2015 Negative Capability Press Book CompetitionMarco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has two new pieces out.  His essay, “A House of Swing Doors: This Future Life (Calvatea gigantea)” on mushrooms and mortality, which began and greatly profited from being in a Stonecoast workshop, is in the May issue of DIAGRAM. His piece “Some Rules for Foraging” will appear in the summer issue of Taproot. Marco was also a finalist for the Sumer Literary Seminar Disquiet program in Lisbon and will be participating in the program this summer.


Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) will be telling a story for The Moth, on May 30th, at a sold-out show at Portland’s State Theater. The episode will be broadcast nationally on NPR. His story will be about the brief and wondrous life of Poppins, the cat.

Portuguese The Sacred Band V2The final volume of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) Acacia series comes out this month in Portugal. It’s called Acácia – Vozes da Profecia, and is the sixth book in the series, as the publisher, Saída de Emergência, divided each book into two volumes.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” will be published in the fall issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) recent reviews include The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings, in the Los Angeles Times, and Stephen King’s Finders Keepers for the Washington Post.

Labor Poetic Labor! 2Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has a new poem available on-line at Essay Press in the second volume of Labor Poetic Labor!. Stephen Motika (Poetry) has written an afterword to this issue.

The New York City premiere of Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera—now has tickets on sale. It will be produced this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with dates now announced and tickets available June 1st for NYMF pass holders and June 15th for the general public. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera will be performed on June 25 at two showcase events: a NYMF Preview at the World Wide Plaza, West 50th and 8th Ave in NYC, 12:00-2:15 p.m. and also a showcase in the Broadway Sessions series at the Laurie Beechman Theater, 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. In addition, there will be a Songwriters’ Showcase for Elizabeth in NYC later in July, details TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but will be at Stonecoast in spirit and hopes to see Stonecoast alums at Rinkside. Check out the coverage in Backstage and Theater Mania. For more info and updates on performances and tickets, visit the show’s website.

Tonya & Nancy The Rock Opera NYMF Logo Hi Res

Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, will feature Stonecoast grad Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) at its eighth annual “Are you a Bookie?” gathering of book clubs and book lovers, June 14, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Admission is free of charge and cake will be served. Elli will be reading from On Hurricane Island, her new novel. Several Stonecoasters are featured in the anthology that will be read from by panelist Nina Gaby, editor of Dumped. The event will include Karen Shepard as keynote speaker. She is the author of The Celestials, an historical novel inspired by the true story of 75 Chinese laborers brought to North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1870 to break a strike at a shoe factory. Emcee will be Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), the university’s writer in residence and director of its writing program. All authors’ books will be available for sale and signing.


DSC_5904There is still space for writers to enroll at Iota: Short Prose Conference! Started by alum Penny Guisinger as a third semester project, Iota is now in its third year of offering high-quality writing instruction in short fiction, essays, prose poems, and all things flash and micro. You define “short”—it’s anything shorter than “long.” This year’s dates are July 23-26, and faculty are Richard Hoffman and Sarah Einstein. Come spend a long weekend writing short forms in Downeast Maine!

charles and sue-iotaCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Interested in writing for the Stonecoast Community blog? We’re looking for all types of essays from alumni, students, and faculty about creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, film, writing, MFAs, post-MFA, interviews, etc. Please contact Robert E. Stutts if you have something you’d like to share.


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Voices of the Community: Julie Poitras Santos

GRADUATE SCHOOL ONE YEAR OUT: putting away my folders

Let me begin by saying this is not my first rodeo: I have another graduate degree. I recall taking a wonderful visiting artist out to lunch mid-way through that earlier degree. He clearly said to me that it took him a good two years to recover from graduate school. Two years!! It seemed like sheer lunacy to me at the time; what was he talking about, what did he mean “recover,” I was doing just fine. Of course, the naiveté of the uninitiated reveals itself in retrospect. I now joke that it took me about ten years to recover. Add a few more years, and it was time for me to go back to school.

It might come as no surprise, then, that I told the announcer before I read in a local reading series this March that I had just graduated, in January. By the end of the evening, however, after ebullient congratulations on my newly minted degree, I was alerted by a companion to the fact that actually no, it wasn’t this January I had graduated, it was last January, over a year ago now. Over a year! Perhaps I truly am time challenged. In part that slip-up must come from a reluctance to let go of the intensity and the transformative qualities of that experience; a desire to hold onto that precious time when a community holds your creativity warmly in its hands and you feel “real”. Velveteen Rabbit real. But in graduate school you become a real writer, a real artist, not because anyone tells you this or a magic fairy grants you your livelihood, but because you decide you are. Because you decide for the love of it, and you do the work of it.

Before going back to school for writing, I harbored a large filing cabinet full of unpublished material. Going back to school for me signified an opportunity to crack that seal, open those files, to stop “writing in silence,” and to get my work out into the world. And so, after graduating, I left my stacks of books and files just as they werespread about my studio, tumbling in disarray, catching dust and yet still managing to look in media res, ready for instant use, implying a certain badge of realness. I abhorred the thought of putting the equivalent of a new filing cabinet’s worth of materials away in metal drawers: it seemed to mark time too harshly, and unfortunately so. Would the writing disappear again behind that metal hum of order? What if I went to school for naught?

Now more than a year out, I am putting away my stacks of papers and folders. I’m happy to say I’ve published a thing or two, here and there; I’ve taught a workshop and read in a few local venues. But more importantly, I’ve sent out hundreds of poems, and I’ve pulled together a manuscript and a chapbook of new poems and I’m sending them out too. I’ve created a small writer’s group and stayed connected to my grad school community; I’ve read new poets and written a few reviews. And of course, this is the work of it. This is the “real writer” I was hoping to becomeno not yet with a published book in hand, no rocket ship of fame for me, not yet. But I’m ok with that. I can put the folders away because I’ve kept working. There is so much still to come, and now I know it.

Julie Poitras Santos, Class of Winter 2014

If anyone else in the community has a similar vignette they would like to share of their post-Residency life, please contact the Stonecoast MFA Alumni Page on Facebook or email me at trevor [dot] gulley [at] -Trevor

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Community News & Updates May 2015

Stonecoast in Ireland

Stonecoast in Ireland will host its 20th residency in January 2016. Information and applications are available from Ted Deppe at The deadline for applying is 14 May 2015.


Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is honored to have learned that guest editor Rebecca Skloot has selected Sheila’s essay “A Question of Corvids” for inclusion in the 2015 Best Science and Nature Writing anthology, to be published this fall by Houghton Mifflin. The essay, an earlier version of which was Sheila’s graduation reading, won the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Award for Creative Nonfiction and has been nominated for a Pushcart Award.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction S ’11) her novel Elysium received the 2014 Philip K. Dick Award Special Citation at Norwescon 38 in Seattle, WA.

Meg Elison, Rod Duncan,  Emmi Itäranta, and Jennifer Marie Brissett (l-r)

Meg Elison, Rod Duncan, Emmi Itäranta, and Jennifer Marie Brissett (l-r)

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Raising Babies”—inspired by memories of southern Indiana,”The Yellow Wallpaper,” and spring—is now available in issue 145 of Crack the Spine.

Sarah R. Flynn (Popular Fiction, W’15) has a piece forthcoming in the July issue of The Writer magazine. The feature article outlines how to create a writing workshop for adult literacy students and was influenced by her third semester project and graduate presentation. This is her first professional sale.

Cynthia Kraack‘s (Fiction, W’10) first literary novel, The High Cost of Flowers, is one of three finalists in two categories of the 25th Anniversary Midwest Book Awards: Literary Fiction and Contemporary Fiction. The competition, sponsored by the Midwest Independent Publishing Association, is judged by experts from all aspects of the book world. They select winners and finalists from a 12-state region based on overall excellence. Cynthia’s first speculative fiction novel, Minnesota Cold, won the 2009 Northeastern Book Award for Fiction.

Mur Lafferty (Popular Fiction, W’14) will be the editor-in-chief and Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be non-fiction editor of Escape Artists’ new speculative fiction e-zine this fall. Issue zero is slated for an August release. Escape Artists are best known for the Escape Pod, Pod Castle, and PseudoPod podcasts.

HazardousMaterial-1Matthew Quinn Martin’s (Popular Fiction, S’10) novella Nightlife: Hazardous Material will be released by Pocket Star/Simon & Schuster on May 11. T.L. Costa, critically acclaimed author of Playing Tyler, has called the book “A taut, mesmerizing tale of horror, madness and video games. It’s as if Stephen King penned Ready Player One. Readers will devour this in one sitting.”

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) has a new essay, “Crossing Borders in Fiction,” in The Cleaver magazine, here.

For the second year in a row, Roxanne Ocasio (Popular Fiction, W’15) and Kristabelle Munson (Fiction, current) have been accepted into the prestigious VONA/Voices writers’ workshop in Miami. Co-founded by Junot Diaz, VONA is the only writers’ conference in the country with a multi-genre focus on writers of color as students and teachers.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’11) has had her latest manuscript, Lost Property Hotline, accepted for April 2016 publication by Biblioasis. Her poem “Margaret Rose” (previously published in The Walrus) will be appearing in Best Canadian Poetry 2015. This has been a busy time for Alexandra, who is also celebrating the release of Measure for Measure: An Anthology of Poetic Meters (Random House/Everyman), co-edited with Annie Finch. Here she is in action earlier this month, reading at the Tree Series in Ottawa:

Janet Passehl’s (Poetry, S’10) poems “Dear Colum,” and “his rented left brother and bottle of yellow music” are published in Calibanonline 19.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “Think of Sophia Loren” will appear in the 2015 edition of Stolen Island Review. He recently played the principal role in the short film Harvey’s Dream adapted from the Stephen King story of the same name that appeared in The New Yorker several years ago. In addition to playing Harvey, he consulted with the writer-director, Ryan Shelley, on the script. A fall premier is to be scheduled at the University of Maine.

“Side Effects,” a short story by Karen Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08), will appear in Reed Magazine, Issue 68, in May. In January, Karen’s story “Brown Jersey Cow” was published online by Every Day Fiction, the once-a-day flash fiction magazine.

Michaela Roessner-Herman‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) short story “Flattened” has been picked for inclusion in the Western Weird anthology, the Speculative Fiction edition of the Manifest West literary anthology series.

Beth Slattery‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) essay, “Hello to All That,” which explores Joan Didion’s writing, was published in the Spring 2015 issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Study.

J.G. Strauss (Fiction, S’14) will read from her novel-in-progress, The Three Lives of Gráinne Ó Mháille as part of Cape Whale at SEA Space in Provincetown, MA, on May 1st, 2015.


Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) fairy tale story “Dance Our Shoes to Pieces” appeared in the most recent issue of Farrago’s Wainscot“An Exodus of Wings” has been reprinted in the audio magazine The Drabblecast“Six Ways to Break Her” appeared on the newly-designed SmokeLong Quarterly along with an interview“The Way of Things” appeared in Crack the Spine alongside another interview.

Ashley Warren‘s (Fiction, S’12) short story “Cataphile” has been selected as an honorable mention for Volume 27 of Allegory.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has retired from the Catawba County (NC) Library System. Her  9-year library newspaper column has converted to a more general one titled “Fork in the Road.” Her essays are also posted on her website.


Elisabeth Tova Bailey‘s (Creative Nonfiction) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, was published by Algonquin Books in 2010. Now the digital audiobook has just been released by The CD edition of the audiobook will launch from Brilliance in July with narration by Renee Raudman. The Chicago Tribune audiobook review is here.

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction) has been invited to give a presentation at Queers & Comics, the first university conference for queer cartoonists and comics writers with keynote speakers Alison Bechdel and Howard Cruse. Kristabelle will show pages of a graphic novella written at Stonecoast.

Marian Romero‘s (Popular Fiction) poem “A portrait of the witch at sixteen” was featured in Abyss and Apex online magazine.


Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has accepted a tenure-track position as assistant professor in the English department at the University of New Hampshire, beginning in fall 2015. He’ll be teaching both in the MFA and undergraduate creative writing programs.

Ted and Annie Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) will be giving a poetry reading at the Connemara Mussel Festival, Mweelrea Hotel, Tully Cross, Ireland, at 6:00 p.m. on 2 May 2015. They will also be reading on the Aran Islands on 21 May for Old Dominion University. Ted’s next U.S. reading has been confirmed for Old Dominion University in Virginia on 8 October 2015.

Beauty and the Beast - Some Gave AllNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new book out: Beauty and the Beast: Some Gave All, based on the Beauty and the Beast reboot on the CW. She and Stonecoast alumna Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) have a new column titled “Writing Reading Guides” in the Science Fiction Writers of America Bulletin.

When astronauts overcorrect a negative turtle jacket on their high-tail thruster, initiating precautionary self-destruct protocol, they have only one recourse: radio Mission Control. Unfortunately, Mission Control has been privatized. Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute play Houston will be staged at the Boston Theatre Marathon—50 ten-minute plays, written by 50 playwrights, produced by 50 theatre companies in one day: Sunday, May 10, starting at 12:00 p.m. at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts, 527 Tremont Street, Boston. Houston will also be staged in Portland, Maine, at the Maine Playwrights’ Festival—seven short plays by Maine playwrights May 13-16 at the St. Lawrence Arts Center.

HoustonElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: the Rock Opera—will be produced in New York City this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with multiple performances in July, dates TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but she hopes to see some Stonecoasters at “ringside” at the show. Check out the coverage in Theater Mania. For info and updates on performances and tickets, visit

Poster from previous Boston production; NYC dates TBD.

Poster from previous Boston production; NYC dates TBD.



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