Tag Archives: Carina Bissett

Community News & Updates August 2018

ALUMS

Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) is pleased to announce that her short story “The Painted Ponies of Wiley Creek” was featured by Not a Pipe Publishing for their Year of Publishing Women’s Short Stories series. Ted Deppe and others at the January ’18 Ireland Residency might recognize it—thanks for all your suggestions and encouragement!

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be presenting his award-winning essay “The Vault of Heaven: Science Fictions’s Perso-Arabic Origins” at Worldcon 76 in San Jose as part of an academic panel titled “Lowriders and Flying Horses: Expanding SF’s Definitions.” The panel will take place on Friday, August 17th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 211D of the San Jose Convention Center.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) placed her poem “Blood Works” in the HWA Poetry Showcase: Vol. 5. She also sold her story “Tyger, Burning Bright” for inclusion in the anthology Gorgon: Stories of Emergence, which is scheduled for publication by Pantheon Magazine this fall. “Blood Works” was written under the mentorship of Cate Marvin, and “Tyger, Burning Bright” was originally written under the mentorship of Liz Hand and was later workshopped under the direction of Cara Hoffman. Carina wants to thank all of the Stonecoasters who helped her shape these pieces for publication.

Melody Fuller (Creative Nonfiction, S’12), President and Founder of The Oakland Wine Festival, published two articles in The SOMM Journal recently: “A Call to Action” (page 80; April/May 2018) looks at the state of diversity in the multi-billion dollar wine industry and sparked an ongoing narrative about race and wine and “Fine-Wining While Black” (page 26; June/July 2018) provides an inspirational personal narrative.

Alan King‘s (Poetry, W’13) Point Blank was among the seven books briefly reviewed and recommended by The Best American Poetry blog. Here’s an excerpt: “[In] Alan King’s second collection of poetry, Point Blank…each poem [is] charged with an undeniable exuberance, willing to hold forth on the unvarnished injustice so visible in the American grain, and to compose a music from this framework as mellifluous as any Luther Vandross track and as rough and ready as Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx.” Read the full review.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) was one of the writers on Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire‘s first DLC, the Beast of Winter, which launches on August 2nd. This adventure takes the player to a frozen island populated by a doomsday cult, an ancient dragon, and gods only know what else.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two essays published in online journals last month: “The Sparrow’s Song” was featured on The Sunlight Press, and “The World in their Hands,” which appeared last year in The Maine Review, was reprinted at Nature Writing.

Roxanne Ocasio’s (Popular Fiction, W’15) short story “The Chupacabra Next Door” will be published in an upcoming anthology called The Latinx Archive: Speculative Fiction for Dreamers. She first workshopped this story at the Voice of Our Nation Arts Foundation Workshop for writers of color in 2014. Roxanne credits Stonecoast for introducing her to Marjorie Liu, who mentored her during her second semester and encouraged her to write characters of color.

Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) is thrilled to come full-circle as a Stonecoaster with her essay about art modeling, “Still Life,” in Issue No. 9 of the Stonecoast Review. She has a forthcoming piece about her walking journey across Finland in the upcoming “Flight” issue of Slice, as well as a craft article on vulnerability—based on her third semester project at Stonecoast—appearing in the fall “Risk” issue of Creative Nonfiction.

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) has joyfully accepted a visiting assistant professorship at Ryerson University’s School of Image Arts with the Faculty of Communication and Design, where she will preside over script development and film productions in the undergraduate film program, and teach screenwriting, directing, and creative leadership. Additionally, her short script Skin Deep has been adapted into a film.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) chapbook, Shades and Forms, has been accepted for fall publication by Clare Songbirds Publishing, and his short story collection The Trash Detail will also come out this fall from New Rivers Press.

Shannon Ratliff‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) essay “Perennial” appears in the Summer ’18 issue of Pleiadescurrently available here.

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W ’18) is the proud co-editor (alongside World Fantasy Award winner Sheree Renée Thomas and poet & artist Rasha Abdulhadi) of a special issue of Strange Horizons featuring stories, poems, and non-fiction from writers of color from the Southeastern USA. You can read Erin’s editorial and an introduction to the six amazing stories in the issue here.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) had a short story, “Tide Child,” recently published by On Spec. It’s about the relationships between fathers and sons, and the day you realize your dad has a story of his own. Also, Selkies. It’s currently only available in print, and can be found here.  This also marks his first international publication. He also just returned from a month-long course in Ireland at NUI-Galway looking at Education in Ireland. If you’re a teacher, or interested in education, check it out here.

Lisa Romeo by David Wilson for The Boston Globe

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), and her new memoir, Starting with Goodbye, were featured in the “Story Behind the Book Column” in The Boston Globe in early July, just ahead of appearances at several bookstores in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Lisa was also featured on an episode of the podcast The Ish (Grieving-Ish, part 2). In early August, she will present a session on getting published and will read during Western Connecticut State University’s MFA residency.

Nikki Sambitsky (Creative Nonfiction, W’18) will be teaching a one-day workshop on grief and hybrid, experimental, and lyric essays this fall (Saturday, December 1st from 1:00-5:00 p.m.) at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop! Check out the link to sign up and RSVP your spot! Another head’s up: Nikki is also teaching an Open Community Writing Session on November 16th from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop. The session is free and open to the public! Come, sit, write, commune with fellow writers!

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) was interviewed on her local NPR station, KERA, about Spiderweb Salon, an arts collective in Denton, Texas, that she’s involved with. Her Nebula-nominated novelette “The Orangery” appears in the Nebula Awards Showcase 2018 anthology. Paula Guran chose her Nightmare story “Secret Keeper” for Guran’s Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2018.

Lisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry ’04) new short story collection, Impossibly Small Spaces was published by Arlen House/Syracuse University Press on July 27th in Ireland. Stonecoasters attending the launch at Merriman’s in Kinvara/County Galway included Ted and Annie Deppe and Teresa Scollon. It will come out in the US in early October (though you can obtain an early copy from Lisa). The price is $20 with $2.00 of each sale going to the ACLU. lisactaylor22@gmail.com

Adrienne S. Wallner’s (Poetry, W ’09) poem “Ticket Stub” will appear in the Fall 2018 issue of Stoneboat Literary Journal.

FACULTY

JJ Amaworo Wilson (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) launched his 2016 novel Damnificados in Caxias do Sul, Brazil, in July 2018 and had smaller events in Sao Paulo, Brasilia, Belo Horizonte, and Natal. The novel, based on a true story that took place in Caracas, Venezuela, has a distinctly Latin American flavor. Damnificados won three awards and will be translated into German and French in 2019.

JJ Amaworo Wilson Damnificados Brazil July 2018

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) writes about race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, When Joe Louis fought Schmeling, White America Enthusiastically Rooted for a Black Man, was a June feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His upcoming YA book, War in the Ring, is also about the historic Louis-Schmeling fight; it will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in Spring 2019.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Non fiction) short story “Refugees,” which he read from at the last residency, is out in the newest issue of Bennington Review.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a special guest at San Diego Comic-Con, where she received the prestigious Inkpot Award for her fiction. In early August, she’ll be teaching a workshop for young writers at the Fine Arts Workshop in Provincetown.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) novella “The Wreck of the Godspeed” has been reprinted in The Final Frontier, edited by Neil Clarke from Night Shade Books. He has sold reprint rights to the original story “Yukui” from his new collection The Promise Of Space to Clarkesworld; it will appear later this year. He contributed an essay on the importance of short stories in science fiction to the blog Whatever.  Jim moderated a reading of Stonecoast alums at the Readercon science fiction and fantasy convention in Quincy on July 14.

Stonecoast alum reading at Readercon 2018

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) short fictions “This New Quiet” and “Dylan’s Lost Years” were included in New Micro: Exceptionally Short Fiction, co-edited by James Thomas and Robert Scotellaro and published by WW Norton, available in August 2018. Her poem “Even on a Sunday Drive” was a finalist in the 2017 Steve Kowit Poetry Prize and was published in the San Diego Poetry Anthology in March 2018. Also, Debra’s video poetry performance, “Small Buried Things: A Poet’s Response to Extraction,” was part of the Bedrock Lecture Series, organized by Oregon State University. The eighteen-part video lecture series was submitted as evidence to the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal on Human Rights, Fracking, and Climate Change, an international tribunal that, in May of 2018, deliberated the global effects of fracking on human rights, the environment, and climate change.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Tamra Wilson’s (Fiction, S’11) anthology Idol Talk has received new media coverage and has multiple readings, including some newly added, in August:

  • Readings with Elizabeth Searle: August 8th at KGB in New York City at 7:00 p.m., including SCers Breena Clarke (Fiction) and new alum Lee J. Kahrs; (http://kgbbar.com/calendar/events/kgb_nyc_area_readers_from_idol_talk/) and August 30th at Harvard General Store 6:00-8:00 p.m. in Harvard, MA (including alum Michelle Soucy (Fiction, S’10, who created the fab. flyer).
  • On August 25th, Lee J Kahrs and Kate Kastelein will read from Idol Talk at 2:00 p.m. at Toadstool Books in Keene, NH.
  • More New England readings coming in September.
  • Readings and Talks in North Carolina with SC alum and Idol Talk co-editor Tamra Wilson: August 12th, Maine St Books in Davidson NC; August 13th Gaston County Library in Gastonia, NC; and August 21st at Morrison Branch Library in Charlotte, NC

Recent media includes Breena Clarke featuring Idol Talk on her blog,  Tammy’s radio interview in Hickory, NC, and the Boston Book Launch coverage on MetroWest Daily. Check the Idol Talk Facebook page for updates.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

YAAK VALLEY FOREST COUNCIL JOB OPENING: COMMUNITY OUTREACH/CONSERVATION ORGANIZER
Rick Bass
(Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change Faculty) and the Yaak Valley Forest Council are looking for a community outreach/conservation organizer to hire for a permanent position in northwest Montana’s Yaak Valley. Pay starts at $35-40K, depending on experience, and has growth potential. Insurance and vacation included, and the new hire will be able to work from home (in the community). Artistic inspiration in northwest Montana an added perk! (How is perk spelled? From what Latin root does it derive?) Sweet country and a valiant non-profit working for ecological and social justice.

BOSTON POETRY MARATHON SET FOR AUGUST 10-12 IN CAMBRIDGE
Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09), along with poets Suzanne Mercury, Darren Black, and Gillian Devereux, are this year’s Boston Poetry Marathon festival organizers. They are all published poets and veteran Marathon readers from the area. The poetry festival is entirely volunteer run. The Boston Poetry Marathon will be held August 10th – 12th, at Outpost 186 in Cambridge’s Inman Square. Throughout three days, over 100 local and out-of-town poets will read and perform their poems. Several Stonecoast Community members will be reading in this year’s marathon. The Marathon presents a diverse range of poetry styles; academics, slam poets, students from local creative writing programs, and everyone in between rub elbows during approximately 20 hours of poetry programming. Each poet is given a brief time slot to share their work with the audience. Attendance is free (donations accepted), and all ages are welcome.

“The Boston Poetry Marathon is a joyful, hopeful, and strengthening event, something vital during these dire times. We have poets, the poetry community, and poems to keep us going,” said co-organizer Bridget Eileen. “ Whether we go to poetry for escape, solace, empathy, or illumination, it fortifies us. When so many people come together to celebrate poetry, that certainly fortifies us. Bringing this event to so many people who treasure it is, of course, a lot of work–but it’s also energizing. All that creativity coming together in one place is really powerful. ”

“With so much political and social uncertainty right now, we feel it’s urgent to create a welcoming space for poets to share their poems and talk with one another,” said co-organizer Suzanne Mercury. “Poetry is a life-giving force, a deep and vital source of creative empathy. The world needs much more of it, especially now. The Boston Poetry Marathon offers more poetry—a lot more! Every year I come away exhausted, inspired, and ready to write.”

Gillian Devereux outlined the festival’s goals for maintaining inclusiveness. “We’re committed to finding new voices who may not have read here in the past to add to our roster. We want to hear from poets who represent the many diverse, vibrant poetic communities in the Greater Boston area.”

“The Marathon has a great base of dedicated followers—poets who share their work year after year,” said Darren Black. “It’s encouraging to see the developmental arcs of talented writers in our city. Whether you’re an established poet who has published many books, or you have never read your work in front of people before, the audience is so supportive. You never know what you’re going to hear. Every year is fresh, and a little unpredictable. But the basic formula is simple: We listen to a bunch of poems. We hang out. We have fun. We hope you’ll join us!”

For media inquiries, please contact the organizers at: bostonpoetrymarathon2018@gmail.com.

Event Details

What:  Boston Poetry Marathon
Where: Outpost 186 – 186 ½ Hampshire Street, Cambridge MA
When:  Friday, August 10th: 6:00-10:30 p.m.; Saturday, August 11th: 12:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m.; Sunday, August 12th: 11:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Online at

bostonpoetrymarathon.wordpress.com
https://www.facebook.com/groups/bonstonpoetrymarathon/
http://instagram.com/bostonpoetrymarathon

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates June 2018

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Poetic Voices of Social Justice: A Reading with Martín Espada and Lauren Schmidt
Thursday July 12th, 7:00 pm
SPACE Gallery, Portland Maine

Please join Stonecoast MFA for a reading and discussion with poetry faculty Martín Espada, recent winner of the prestigious Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, and award-winning poet Lauren Schmidt. There will be live music, and a chance to share thoughts and inspiration as a community. The $10-20 suggested donation will directly benefit the Stonecoast MFA Writing for Social Justice Scholarship Fund.

 

Pitch 2018

Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance (MWPA) Pitch 2018 offers writers the chance to pitch their manuscripts or book proposals to agents from leading NYC-based literary agencies and editors from some of Maine’s largest publishers. Pitch 2018 provides the rare opportunity to make a literary pitch face-to-face in Maine, to make connections with agents, editors, and other writers, and to gain insider knowledge on the publishing industry. MWPA is proud to offer a three-pitch scholarship to a writer who is from an underrepresented community currently living in Maine and who can demonstrate financial need, sponsored by participating agent Saba Sulaiman. Applications are due in the MWPA office on July 2nd at 9:00 a.m. MORE INFORMATION → Pitch will be held Saturday, September 29th from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Glickman Library on the University of Southern Maine campus in Portland. Registration opens on June 12th. More information is here.

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W’12) is excited to announce that her paranormal historical romance Moon Shadow, Book #2 (The Auriano Curse Series) won the Readers’ Choice Award. Part of the manuscript was workshopped at Stonecoast and mentored by the fabulous and inimitable Mike Kimball. Thank you to everyone who had a hand in making this book a winner.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated the May 3rd episode of Escape Pod, featuring the story “Fire Rode The Cold Wind” by Aimee Ogden. You can listen to it here.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) published her mermaid-inspired story “The Landscape of Lacrimation” in the second issue of the online literary magazine The Hunger. She also has recently placed her poem “C8: A Tessellation of Faces, Wings, and other Obscure Things,” which will be featured in forthcoming issue of the NonBinary Review Issue 17: A Wrinkle in Time.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) was happy to learn her LGBTQ+ historical romance novel Swift for the Sun was selected as a finalist for the Eric Hoffer award.

After ten years of work, Elizabeth Garber‘s (Creative Nonfiction, ‘10) book, Implosion: A Memoir of an Architect’s Daughter, will be released June 12th from She Writes Press. Her memoir focuses on how her family was caught in a collision between modern architecture, radical social change, and madness in the turbulent 1960s and 1970s in Cincinnati. Her book tour takes her from New York City, Boston, Maine, Cincinnati, and Vermont. The book has received a starred Kirkus review (“poetic and incisive”) and Library Journal calls it “an extraordinary debut memoir.” Implosion has a contract to be released by a large-print press as well. For more details and dates to join her for a reading/presentation, go to www.elizabethgarber.com

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13)  poem “Wind Turbines of Altamont Pass” will be published in the anthology Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California. Her poem “Puma” was accepted for publication in The Marin Poetry Center Anthology 2018. Her poem, “Where Did it Go?” and four animal haiku were printed in Poem in Your Pocket Day by Berkeley Public Library.

Penny Guisinger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “Looking for Luke Skywalker,” first published in Hippocampus, is a finalist for a Maine Literary Award in the short works category. This would be her second MLA. Winners will be announced at an event on June 14th, so cross some fingers for her!

Michael L. Joy (Popular Fiction, S’13) was offered a full-time Professorship in the English Department at Florida SouthWestern State College starting this Fall.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11), is happy to announce Poetry Barn’s Peak Color Retreat, October 6-9​, an inspiring weekend of poetry steeped in the vibrance of fall in the Catskills. Judith Vollmer (MFA faculty, Drew University) will offer a master workshop titled: The Living Object: Image & Movement. Visit the website for full details.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) posted a new blog post, “No Country for Old Books…Or So It Seems,” which explores the challenges of marketing a book over a year old. The post highlights advantages that “older” books have over “newly-released” ones. Read it here.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) recently completed a writing retreat at the University of Washington’s Whiteley Center on San Juan Island, Washington. He has had two recent non-fiction publications: his essay “Parable of the Cascade” was published by About Place Journal (as Ryan Patrick Gannon) as well as an article called “Open and Closed: The Class That Sank” in the Open Pedagogy Notebook. He presented an essay “She Has Always Been Here: Mystique, Destiny, and Female LGBT Representation in Marvel Comics” at the Dartmouth College conference on Illustration, Comics, and Animation. Later this month, he will be heading back to Ireland to participate in NUI-Galway’s Summer School program on Teaching in Ireland, where he will also hopefully complete that book of poems he started during the SCI 2017 residency in Howth.

Ruthie Rohde’s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) essay “Wild Abandon” was recently published in The Palgrave International Handbook of Women and Outdoor Learning, edited by Tonia Gray and Denise Mitten (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018). Ruthie and Stonecoast alumnus Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) presented together with Dr. Ann Murphy on a panel at the Western Connecticut Trauma Conference at Western Connecticut State University. The panel was titled: “Write Where you Are: Building and Fostering Writing Workshops in Prisons, Homeless Shelters, Hospitals and Other Medical and Community Settings.”

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is pleased to note that her new book, Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss, published May 1st, has been reviewed at Brevity and in Publishers Weekly, where she’s also been featured in a Spotlight interview. Lisa is also interviewed on the Shelf Awareness “Reading with…” series; contributed to the LargeHearted Boy’s “Playlist;” and appears on the Creative Nonfiction podcast . Her craft article and excerpts, on adding humor to a grief memoir, appears on The Memoir Project, and an essay in Books by Women, “If You Give a Writer a Book Contract, She’s Going to Want…Everything,” takes a look at author envy. Lisa appeared with Suzanne Strempek Shea at Amherst Books (MA) recently, and is interested in partnering with other Stonecoast folks who have new(ish) books out, for bookstore appearances, conference panels, reading, and/or other events. Contact her here. In June, she’s making many book tour stops in New Jersey and in July, in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has managed to publish creative work while continuing her full-time job as a science writer for the University of Maine: a lyric essay, “The New Diving Duck Blues,” is in the Spring issue of Cold Mountain Review. She also co-authored the cover story about coastal storms in the spring issue of UMaine Today, wrote an article about alewives in lakes in the May issue of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine, and published a short reflection on “Communicating about rare and common species” in The Plainspoken Scientist.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has been awarded an Individual Excellence Award and a $5000 grant for his writing by the Ohio Arts Council.

FACULTY

On May 31st, Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) spoke at the Lewiston Public Library about her forthcoming novel, Curious Toys, and the work and influences of noted outsider artist Henry Darger, the book’s inspiration.  On June 2nd she will one of the featured writers at the Maine Crime Wave Festival in Portland. On Tuesday, June 5th, she’ll be part of a panel honoring the legacy of writer Thomas M. Disch at Brooklyn Common, in Brooklyn, NY.  On Wednesday, June 6th, she’ll be reading at the Kinokuniya Bookstore in New York City as part of the group faculty reading for the Writer’s Hotel Writers Conference, where she’s an instructor June 6-11. On June 21-22, she’ll be guest instructor at the Odyssey Writers Workshop in Manchester, NH. Forthcoming book reviews include A True History of the Vampire Uprising for The Washington Post.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) new existential starship novelette, “Grace’s Family,” was published last month on Tor.com.  Also in May, Jim had the honor of introducing his friend and longtime editor, Sheila Williams, at the Science Fiction Writers of America’s Nebula Awards Ceremony. Sheila won the Solstice Award, which acknowledges “individuals who have had a significant impact on the science fiction landscape.” In reprint news, not only did Jim write the introduction and the afterword to the just published anthology A Fistful of Dinosaurs, but he contributed the oft-reprinted “Think Like A Dinosaur” to the table of contents. His novelette “Men Are Trouble” will appear in the forthcoming aliens-on-Earth anthology Not One Of Us from Prime Books. His Hugo-Award-winning “Ten to the Sixteenth to One” will appear soon in the international digital magazine The Short Story Project based in Israel. His story “The Promise of Space” will be published in China by Guangzhou Blue Ocean Press in an as-yet unnamed anthology aimed at the high school and university market.

Jim Kelly and Sheila Williams at the Nebula Awards ceremony.

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ICFA 2018

Written by Peter Adrian Behravesh

Stonecoast had a large presence at this year’s International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.

Theodora Goss (Popular Fiction faculty) hosted a roundtable about The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, read from European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, and spoke on a panel discussing the Frankenstein meme.

James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty) moderated a panel on how adaptation transforms narratives.

Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12) spoke on a panel about decolonizing fantastic storytelling.

J.R. Dawson‘s (Popular Fiction, S’16) 10-minute play was performed at the third annual ICFA Flash Play Festival. James Patrick Kelly performed in one of the other plays.

Many students and alumni presented academic papers, including Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18), Kaitlin Branch (Popular Fiction, W’18), Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18), Lew Andrada (Popular Fiction, W’17), Alex Sherman (Popular Fiction, W’17), Kelsey Olesen (Popular Fiction, W’17), Lauren Liebowitz (Popular Fiction, S’16), and Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12).

Other Stonecoasters spotted at the conference include Jasmine Skye (Popular Fiction, W’20), Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction, S’19), AJ Bauers (Popular Fiction, W’17), Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14), Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), and Will Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11).

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates August 2017

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) epic dragon-warrior poem “Fire Lover” will appear in a future issue of Heroic Fantasy Quarterly. Her flash-fiction alien-possession story “Like a Soul,” which first appeared in Stonecoast Review #1, has been reprinted in Descansos: Words from the Wayside, ed. Susannah Carlson (Niles, CA: Darkhouse Books, July 3 2017).

Katie Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) is honoured that her story “La Corriveau” has been nominated for the Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic. In addition, she has joined the masthead of Apex Magazine and will commence duties as their podcast producer in September.

Chelsey Everest Eiel (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) is excited to announce the August 1st opening of her newest creative venture, The Common Room.  The Common Room is a store and workshop space located in Philadelphia, where womxn-identified/nonbinary artists can show & sell their work, learn new skillsets, and gather for community events such as writing workshops and art classes. In a world where the arts are increasingly delegitimized and defunded, where women continue to battle inequality and injustice, and where community proves essential to our enduring well-being, The Common Room will be the hub of creative, womxn-driven art and events in the Greater Philadelphia region.

Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09)—along with poets Andrew K. Peterson, Gillian Devereux and Suzanne Mercury—are the organizers for this year’s Boston Poetry Marathon, a three-day poetry reading festival held in Cambridge. This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon will take place from Friday, Aug 18th, to Sunday, Aug 20th, at Outpost (186 Hampshire Street in Inman Square, Cambridge), and feature over 100 poets reading for eight minutes each. The now-20 year tradition continues, with Bridget and the other three organizers at the helm for the first time. It’s a great literary event, and all are welcome. Admission is free but donations are welcome to help cover venue costs. This year, several members of the Stonecoast community will be participating, as well. Please come by! Instagram: @bostonpoetrymarathon

Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) has taken over as the Assignments Editor for Current Magazine in Ann Arbor. If you have ideas for freelance articles of topical interest (especially locally in Michigan) and/or books you’d like to have reviewed, email him at annarboreditor@adamsstreetpublishing.com.

Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) is excited to report that the feature-film script he co-wrote, Being, begins principal photography next month. Joining the cast—which already features Lance Henriksen (Aliens, Near Dark, Millennium) and Robert John Burke (Stephen King’s Thinner, Law & Order: SVU, Oz)—are rising Saudi Arabian star Ahd (Collateral, Wadjda), who will be making her American film debut, and science fiction icon Ben Browder (Farscape, Stargate: SG1, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, Arrow, Doctor Who)…along with a host of noted Indie film, TV, and New York Theatre actors (James Patrick NelsonDanielle SkraastadJames St. VincentKaylyn ScardefieldJason IannaconeBrian FoysterEkaterina Sknaria, & Craig Castaldo…AKA Radioman).

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) has had an essay published in 3 Nations Anthology, a collection of writings by Abenaki, Atlantic Canadian, and Maine writers; the piece is an excerpt from her third semester project on the poet Elizabeth Bishop. Ellie will also have her poem “This Girl” included in the anthology WAVES: A Confluence of Women’s Voices organized by the A Room of Her Own Foundation.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) will be the Keynote Speaker at the 77th Annual Writers Conference at Ocean Park on August 7th at 7:00 p.m. Other presenters include Stu Kestenbaum, Eric Moulton, Betsy Sholl, Patricia O’Donnell, David Blair, Jensen Beach, and Gibson Fay-Leblanc. For additional information, contact co-director Dr Jim Brosnan at jbrosnan@jwu.edu or by phone at 401 598-1424.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) Gothic murder story “Ghost Town” appears in the latest Black Static. Her SF story “Doors” has been reprinted in Cast of Wonders.

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) has an essay featured in Narrative; “Landskein” will run as a Story of the Week in early August.

“Arkteia,” a short story by Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14), is in the latest issue of See the Elephant magazine; this was the first story she had workshopped at Stonecoast.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction) earned an honorable mention from the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest for her story “The Certainty of Silence.” In addition, her “Rappaccini’s Daughter”/”Jack and the Beanstalk” mash-up, “A Seed Planted,” was selected from open submissions for inclusion in the anthology Hath No Fury, which features the work of such notable authors as Seanan McGuire, Nisi Shawl, Delilah S. Dawson, Carol Berg, and Lucy A. Synder; Hath No Fury is scheduled for publication in September 2017. Carina is also working as a guest editor for a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale edition at NonBinary Review.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be joining Elizabeth Searle, Cait Johnson, and Cheryl Boyce-Taylor for a celebration of Stonecoast past and present in a reading at the Poetry Barn’s Third Fridays at Woodstock Library reading series at Woodstock Library, 5 Library Lane, Woodstock, NY, on Friday, August 18th, at 6:00 pm.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) sold “Gaslamp: Tampa Bay” to Hardboiled Horror and “The Strange Adventure of Mary Holder” to Gaslight Gothic.

Jim Kelly‘s (Popular Fiction) new novel, Mother Go, was published in July as an audiobook original by Audible.com. It’s also available in audio only on Amazon. By contract there will be a print blackout until 2018, so if you want to find out what Jim has been up to, you’ll have to listen. This is a publishing experiment and Jim is the lab rat; he needs your help! For example if anyone feels like annotating . um . reviewing it on Audible or Amazon, Jim will be in your debt. According to Audible: “Mariska Volochova is the clone of a famed space explorer, but she rejects her mother and her heritage and wants no part of interstellar adventure. But the sweep of interplanetary politics and an affair with a Martian catches Mariska up in a conspiracy to commit a bold theft that will alter the future of space colonization. Mariska must put her life on the line again and again if she is to discover who she is and what her true destiny must be. In his first new novel in more than 20 years, Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Award winner James Patrick Kelly has crafted a hard science techno-thriller that never loses its focus on the conflicted emotional life of Mariska, a true citizen of the posthuman 22nd century.”

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is featured on Women’s Watch on WBZ Radio (Boston; CBS affiliate) in an interview about her book, theater and film projects. The show was broadcast on July 4th and is available online here. In addition to the Poetry Barn reading noted above, Elizabeth will be reading from her novel We Got Him in the BookBreeze series at the Duxbury Public Library in Duxbury, MA, on the Cape on August 2nd at 7:00 p.m. In September, Elizabeth is offering an intensive beginner’s writing workshop at Breena Clarke’s Hobart Village Festival of Women Writers; please visit the website for more info.

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2016

ALUMS

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has 7 pieces of exciting news this month.

  1. Her new short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” has been accepted into fellow alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art & Words Show—Karen is so very excited to participate in the show again!!!!
  2. Also, Karen’s haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Iron Soap’s 200 CCs on October 7, 2016.
  3. The sad puppies kerfuffle poem Karen mentioned last month, “Keep Hugo Stormed,” is now available for reading (scroll all the way to the bottom) at Eye to the Telescope Magazine. She is still nervous about potential reactions to the poem but as yet has received only positive feedback.
  4. Her epic science fiction novella “Failsafe” (18k word salute to Aliens) will be reprinted in a forthcoming science fiction anthology put out by Onyx Neon Shorts.
  5. A 1250-word “Like a Soul” flash, originally published in The Stonecoast Review, will be reprinted in Centum Press’s first anthology, One Hundred Voices.
  6. She’s going to be an author guest (with Stonecoaster Mur Lafferty) at the GenCon Writer’s Symposium this August, moderating/speaking on seven panels and one critique workshop.
  7. The DSP Publications editing team working on her 27,000-word pirate adventure novella “Swift for the Sun” (coming 1st quarter 2017) have crafted this very cool blurb:

Benjamin Swift imagines himself a smuggler, a gun runner, and an all-around scoundrel. A preacher’s son turned hard-bitten criminal. Sinner extraordinaire. But first and foremost, a survivor.

He’s never considered himself noble.

When Benjamin is shipwrecked on a tropical island, fortune sends an unlikely savior: a blond savage who is everything Benjamin didn’t know he needed. Falling in love with Sun is easy, but pirates have come looking for the remains of Benjamin’s cargo. They find their former slave, Sun, instead.

Held captive by the pirates, Benjamin learns the depths of Sun’s past and the horrors he has been exposed to and forced to perpetrate. Together, they must not only escape, but prevent a shipment of weapons from making its way to rebellious colonists. Benjamin is determined to save the man he loves and ensure their peaceful future together is never threatened again. To succeed might require the unthinkable—an altruistic sacrifice.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay appear in the fall issue of Jabberwock Review. Thanks to the mentors and members of Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s workshop who helped her work on this piece. This is Amy’s first published essay.

Paula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) third novel, The Drowning Girls, was published on April 26 by Mira. It was chosen by Target as an Emerging Authors pick and has received early critical acclaim, including a starred review in Library Journal. She was a recent guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss writing the book. Her first novel, The Mourning Hours (workshopped at Stonecoast and mentored by Suzanne Strempek Shea and Boman Desai), is being rereleased this summer in a mass market format. Paula is a lecturer in writing at the University of California, Merced, and will serve this summer as permanent faculty at Go Deep, a writing and yoga retreat in the Sierra Nevadas.  More information can be found on her website www.paulatreickdeboard.com

In April, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) was hired by Sony Television International as a consultant in Moscow on Russian adaptations of American television comedies. After a month on The Voronins, the Russian version of Everybody Loves Raymond, he has been assigned to run the writers’ room on Lucky Us, the Russian version of Roseanne. Mike will oversee the writing staff as it prepares outlines and scripts for episodes of the series.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold a new science fiction novel called The Fortress at the End of Time to Tor.com.

MagickByMoonriseFinalLaura Navarre‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) award-winning Tudor fallen angel romance Magick By Moonrise was picked up by Harlequin’s worldwide paranormal romance program as a direct-to-consumer release for August 2016, thereby proving again the wisdom of the writer’s adage: “Don’t follow the trends. Write what you love.” Laura’s amazed that it worked. 🙂

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short story, “Sola Fide,” will be featured in the summer issue of Able Muse Review.

Historic Acadia National ParkHistoric Acadia National Park: The Stories Behind One of America’s Great Treasures by Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has just been published by Lyons Press, part of a series of books in observance of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016. Schmitt will host a launch party at the Northeast Harbor Library on May 18.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Split,” a fantastical fictionalization of her move to Eugene, OR, in 2010, appeared in The Master’s Review. She has also announced the participants in the 2016 Art & Words Collaborative Show she curates annually, which started out as her Stonecoast Third Semester Project, and she was thrilled to see a plethora of Stonecoast alumni in her submissions queue. This year the show will feature alum Shawna Borman and Karen Bovenmyer. For a complete list of participants, click here.

From Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Thanks to the contributions of Stonecoast leaders and alumni, Artists Wielding Words and Images was a huge success. Robin Talbot‘s unassuming grace made it possible for 85 artists, students, and community members to gather and explore the power of art (broadly defined to include written word and visual image) to effect social change. Justin Tussing moderated a panel of writers and photographers who shared challenges of creating work that reflects social issues. Novelist Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, ‘06) discussed the personal journey that led to two novels with themes addressing the emotional impact of political activism. Alumna Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11) and student Jenny O’Connell (‘17) helped to create breakout sessions in which participants experienced ways in which their own creativity might influence social change. Adult artists and the King Fellows (high school students whose creative writing focuses on racism and social justice) facilitated the breakouts. Artists Wielding Words and Images will be the blueprint for ongoing community conversations about art as an agent of social change.

Jennifer Wade (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) is a reader for Creative Nonfiction magazine and its new enterprise, True Story magazine, which will debut this fall, featuring one long form CNF piece each issue.

Ashley Warren (Fiction, S’12) has four poems—“Modern Witchcraft: A Business Meeting,” “Ode to Procrastination,” “Spreadsheet,” and “Symptoms of a Brain Injury”—in an April 2016 issue of Easy Street.

STUDENTS

Mythic DeliriumCarina Bissett‘s (Popular Fiction) poem “Swimming with the Shark Boys” is featured online in the May selections of Mythic Delirium (Issue 2.4).

Ellie O’Leary’s (Poetry) poem “The Ghosts Rondeau in the Granite” will appear in issue 36 of The Northern New England Review. Her poem “The Woods Are Open to Me Now” (a rimas dissolutas) will be in the book The Crafty Poet II: A Portable Workshop by Diane Lockward.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel, The Risen, about the Spartacus rebellion against ancient Rome will be published on May 3rd, both as a hardback and as an audiobook.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching at the Peripatetic Writing Workshop this summer, in Woodstock, NY. It’s both a workshop and a writing retreat with lots of opportunities to get extensive feedback, especially for those working on longer projects. Check out their website for more info: http://www.peripateticwritingandart.org/home

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Hard Light has received rave reviews from Maureen Corrigan at The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and the Associated Press, among others. She was featured as part of the Rubin Museum’s Brainwaves Festival in NYC, where she appeared with neuroscientist Dr. Carl Bazil in a conversation about parasomnia, spoke with the A.V. Club’s Jason Heller about her five favorite books on music, and did a reading at the Mysterious Bookshop in NYC. Just announced: she’s co-editing the upcoming issue of the literary magazine Conjunctions with Bradford Morrow. Her essay on Hillary Chute’s Disaster Drawn: Visual Witness, Comics, and Documentary Form appeared in The Boston Review. Recent reviews include Lavie Tidhar’s A Man Lies Dreaming for The Washington Post.

StokerCon-logo-red-whiteNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will participate in StokerCon™, the annual horror conference presented by the Horror Writers Association, at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas from May 12-15. She will be riding the HWA Los Angles StokerBus, leaving the Iliad Bookstore in North Hollywood on Thursday around 10 AM. There are still seats available! Cost is currently $176 but will decrease with every new rider. Contact Nancy if you are interested. At StokerCon, she will participate in signings, readings, panel discussions, and teaching “How to Write Scary” at Horror University. Her panels include “Screenplay Writing for Authors” with 41dYNQfjMLL-1._SX302_BO1,204,203,200_Jack Ketchum and “The Romance of Horror” with Heather Graham. She will co-present the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel with Goosebumps author R.L. Stine. Also, Fire at Sea, Nancy’s third Beauty and the Beast novel, set in the universe of the CW TV show, will go on sale on May 31.

This month Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will make his acting debut as comedian Henny Youngman in his short play Henny and Hitler in Hell. The play is part of a collection of seven short plays in a show called Group Synergy. The Actors Studio of Newburyport. The Tannery, Mill #1, Suite 5, Newburyport, MA 01950.

"Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked."

“Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked.”

 

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