Tag Archives: Christine Tierney

Community News & Updates August 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

It’s Boston Poetry Marathon time again! This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon is Friday-Sunday, August 16, 17, and 18, and …WE HAVE REALLY EXCITING NEWS! *We will be in a NEW LOCATION this year!* We are having this year’s Marathon at The Community Church of Boston at 565 Boylston St in Copley Square. This year’s event times are Friday, August 16th, from 6:00-10:30 p.m., Saturday, August 17th, from 12:00-10:30 p.m. (with a dinner break around 5:30, starting up again at 7:00 p.m.), and Sunday, August 18th, from 12:00-6:00 p.m. As always: every reader gets eight minutes each. For the third year running, Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09) is an organizer of this 20+ year-old Boston-area poetry festival tradition. This year’s lineup is TBD, but past years’ Stonecoast participants include alums Florine Melnyk, Carol Berg, Christine Tierney, and Vanesa Pacheco, and faculty Richard Hoffman and D. Nurkse. Admission is free but donations are welcome and appreciated. We are collecting donations ahead of time to help us with this year’s event at the new location. Learn more here. Event details are can be found here.

FACULTY

Breena Clarke (Fiction), co-founder and co-organizer of The Hobart Festival of Women Writers, is hosting a stunning lineup of women writers for the seventh consecutive year in the small New York town of Hobart, the Book Village of The Catskills. The Festival offers three days of readings and workshops in every genre. The Festival will also present a Public Conversation that is free and open to all, “In These Times: Writing. Terror. Possibility.” Hobart Festival of Women Writers 2019 will be held on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, September 6th, 7th, & 8th. For information and registration, click here. For Spotlights of all of the 2019 Participating Writers, go here.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) will be reading from his novel Nirvana Is Here at the annual Out Write Literary Festival in Washington, DC, Saturday, August 3rd, from 1:00-2:00 p.m. at the Reeves Center at 14th St. NW and U St. Aaron is also please to announce that the audio rights to Nirvana Is Here have just been sold.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was an instructor at The Writers Hotel in New York City in early June and then later in the month was lead instructor at the Clarion West Writers Workshop in Seattle. Her forthcoming novel Curious Toys was reviewed in Publishers Weekly, which called it “a phantasmagoric time trip tailor made for fans of The Devil in the White City.” Recent reviews are Kate Mosse’s The Burning Chambers for The Washington Post and Paul Tremblay’s story collection Growing Things for The Los Angeles Times. Elizabeth was profiled and interviewed by Michael Fournier in punk zine Razorcake, talking about her involvement in the nascent NYC and DC punk scenes in the 1970s.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) feature film script A Four-Sided Bed, and the short film based on her novel, Four-Sided, have both been accepted at the upcoming Massachusetts Independent Film Festival in September. Elizabeth’s script is one of five finalists for Best Feature Film Script and the film Four-Sided will make its USA premiere at the festival, having screened previously in Cannes and been a Finalist at ShanghaiPRIDE festival. Elizabeth will be attending the festival with one of her feature film project producers, Amy Carpenter Scott of Creatrix Films. In other recent film news, Elizabeth’s script for A Four-Sided Bed won a Feature Film ‘Diamond’ Script prize in the International Independent Film Awards, was a Finalist in the California Women’s Film Awards, and was an Official Selection at Austin Revolution Film Festival. In July, her script was performed as a full Staged Reading at ReelHeART International Film and Script Festival in Toronto and as a Best Scenes reading at the film festival LGBT Toronto. Visit: www.afoursidedbedfilm.com 

Elizabeth and the ReelHeART Film Festival cast of A Four-Sided Bed in Toronto

Cazenovia University Professor Grazyna J. Kozaczka writes about Suzanne Strempek Shea’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) four Polish-American-set novels in her new book, Writing the Polish American Woman in Postwar Ethnic Fiction (Ohio University Press). The book examines seven decades of writing by North American-born and immigrant authors representing the Polish-American Catholic tradition. The chapter “Suzanne Strempek Shea’s Gendered Ethnicity in the 1970s and 1980s” begins with this observation: “In constructing a female perspective, fiction writers such as the Chinese Americans Gish Jen, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Amy Tan, the Native American Louise Erdrich,the Puerto Rican Judith Ortiz Cofer, the Dominican American Julia Alvarerz and the Polish American Suzanne Strempek Shea have forced many of their characters into a process of reinventing both their gender and ethnic identities within a class-conscious environment.”

ALUMS

Emma Galvin will be voicing the audiobook for Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) Pivot, the first novel of the Jack Harper trilogy. Galvin has voiced an incredible number of audiobooks, which include Winter’s Bone and the Divergent series.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be appearing at Worldcon 77 in Dublin. He will be presenting his paper “Mischief in Her Heart: Women’s Empowerment in the Persian Fantastic” on Friday, August 16th, at 11:30 a.m. He will also be appearing on the following panels:

  • Writing from Non-Western Cultures (Thursday, August 15, 11:00 a.m.)
  • Fuzzy Lines: Decategorising Creative Work (Thursday, August 15, 2:00 p.m.)
  • Muslim SFF (Saturday, August 17, 1:00 p.m.)
  • Using Science in Fantasy Writing (Sunday, August 18, 4:00 p.m.)

See the Worldcon website for full details. In addition, PodCastle, the fantasy fiction podcast Peter produces, had been nominated for the British Fantasy Award for Best Audio.Ryan Brod (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) has accepted an adjunct teaching offer from University of New England’s English department, starting this fall. He has a short essay in the recently released summer issue (10.4) of The Flyfish Journal, and he continues to contribute regularly to the popular website MeatEater.

In continuing to break barriers, Debbie Smith Daughetee’s (Popular Fiction, S’06) comic book company, Kymera Press, just filled an order by the Smithsonian National Natural History Museum for the comic Ivory Ghosts, a murder mystery set against the illegal ivory trade.

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’14) is excited to announce that her debut book, The Bone Cutters, is set for publication on September 1st through Eraserhead Press. It’s a “bizarro” horror novella set in a dysfunctional psychiatric hospital. The story follows a troubled young woman named Dory who encounters a seriously strange and brutal group of psychiatric patients. Her introduction to this group of patients sets Dory on the run to save her life. The book will be available, as of right now, through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Longfellow Books. Renee is also very excited to announce that a book launch event for The Bone Cutters is being hosted by Longfellow Books in Portland, ME, on Thursday, September 5th at 7:00 p.m. at their 1 Monument Square bookstore location. Along with her reading, there will also be live music to help set the mood, performed by local guitarist Shaun Church Reehl, and the amazing Elizabeth Searle will be Renee’s Introduction Queen. Renee is also thrilled to announce that there are two great reviews out already for The Bone Cutters: one on Ginger Nuts of Horror and one on Kendall Reviews. A third review is coming out soon in Cemetery Dance, the date of which is not yet known, though it should be available before the September 1st publication of the book. Here are snippets of what reviewers are saying about The Bone Cutters:

“It’s actually refreshing to be able to enjoy a book so much that you were miffed when it was over. … As the debut novella from Renee S. DeCamillis it’s a fantastic beginning to what could prove to be a career to watch. … I’m giving this a solid 4 out of 5 [stars]. … Considering that I’ve never read anything which rated a 5 I think The Bone Cutters is doing just fine.” ~Joe X. Young, reviewer for Ginger Nuts of Horror.

“I immediately fell in love with Dory, the writing style, the story… This is a terribly heart-wrenching story with a bit of a haunted house/ghost vibe where you’re also being chased by a bunch of crazy people who want to devour your bones. I didn’t want to put this book down.” ~Miranda Crites, reviewer for Kendall Reviews

Kendall Reviews also published a piece Renee wrote on the subject of “Why Do You Write Horror?” For those of you who are interested, here is the link. Also, on Friday, August 2nd, Ginger Nuts of Horror is releasing an interview with Renee. From their home page you can click on the “Interviews” link on the left hand side of the screen to find the interview. Here is their link.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) has published his academic essay “The Commodification of Transcendence: Absurdism and Existentialism in The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch” in PKD Otaku #39 (a zine celebrating the work of Philip K. Dick), available here. Also, Jess has accepted an advancement from the University of New Hampshire and will now be attending graduate school as a candidate for a PhD in Literature.

Florence Grende‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’07) book The Butcher’s Daughter: A Memoir has been shortlisted for the Rubery Book Award (2019). Along with the Kindle Book Award NonFiction (2018), the book has garnered yearly awards since its publication in late 2016.

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be giving a short presentation at HippoCamp 2019, a conference for creative nonfiction writers (August 23-25, Lancaster, PA). The presentation is derived from his third semester project and graduating presentation about reducing the number of sentences that start with “I.” This is important to avoid sounding egotistical in memoir and to reduce sentence structure repetition.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) will be speaking at the White County Creative Writers annual conference in Searcy, AR, on August 31st on “Researching Fiction.” She’ll use examples from her work: attending the citizen’s police academy for a policewoman character, spending two days at a TV station watching the news being put together for a news anchor character, going behind the bar to wash beer mugs for a bartender character, etc.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) is pleased to announce that the legendary aerialist, creativity expert, and award-winning writer Philippe Petit has joined Catskill LIT Writing Retreat as Artist-in-Residence. Mr. Petit will lead a workshop in ekphrastic writing.

Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) and Joseph Tachovsky’s 40 Thieves: Saipan, the World War II story of the Sixth Marine Regiment’s Scout Sniper Platoon—precursors to Navy Seals—was sold to Regnery History for publication in spring 2020. Stories for this narrative non-fiction book were gathered through hours of interviews with surviving men, their letters, photos, and historical Marine materials.

Kristin Leonard‘s (Fiction, S’18) historical short story “El Camino Real” is the featured fiction in the open-access academic journal Postcolonial Text (Vol. 14, No. 1).

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be presenting at the Hobart Festival of Women Writers September 6-8, 2019, in Hobart, NY. She’ll be reading on Friday, September 6th; on Saturday she’ll teach a workshop, “In It for the Long Haul: Writing the Novel.”

Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be teaching a workshop on Memoir at the 79th Annual Writers’ Conference at Ocean Park (Maine) on August 13th at 9:30 a.m.

On August 16th at 6:00 p.m., Dave Patterson (Fiction, W’13) discusses his novelSoon the Light Will Be Perfect, at The Briar Patch in Bangor.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction S’08) interviewed fiction writer Lisa Lenzo for The Rumpus, about Lenzo’s new short story collection, Unblinking. Romeo’s essay “Playing Along with My Dad’s Alzheimer’s Confusion,” which enlarges on a scene/idea in her memoir, Starting With Goodbye, appeared this month in Human Parts.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) essay “Buried Beneath Her Skin Like Slivers” was recently published in Under the Sun. Her flash essay “The Release” was published in the most recent issue of Pembroke MagazineHer short story “Spiraling Through the Sky” was a finalist for the 2019 New Letters Publication Award in Fiction.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has had his memoir/essay collection, Madder, taken by Coffee House Press. It will appear in 2021.

 

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Community News & Updates July 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

It’s Boston Poetry Marathon time again! This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon is Friday-Sunday, August 16, 17, and 18, and …WE HAVE REALLY EXCITING NEWS! *We will be in a NEW LOCATION this year!* We are having this year’s Marathon at The Community Church of Boston at 565 Boylston St in Copley Square. This year’s event times are Friday, August 16th, from 6:00-10:30 p.m., Saturday, August 17th, from 12:00-10:30 p.m. (with a dinner break around 5:30, starting up again at 7:00 p.m.), and Sunday, August 18th, from 12:00-6:00 p.m. As always: every reader gets eight minutes each. For the third year running, Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09) is an organizer of this 20+ year-old Boston-area poetry festival tradition. This year’s lineup is TBD, but past years’ Stonecoast participants include alums Florine Melnyk, Carol Berg, Christine Tierney, and Vanesa Pacheco, and faculty Richard Hoffman and D. Nurkse. Admission is free but donations are welcome and appreciated. We are collecting donations ahead of time to help us with this year’s event at the new location. Learn more here. Event details are can be found here.

FACULTY

Candor Arts, in collaboration with Illinois Humanities and their #IllinoisTurns200, produced a risograph broadside of Tara Betts‘ (Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) Illinois Bicentennial poem. The broadside also features illustrations by Kiki Dupont. Betts’ poem nods at the sesquicentennial Gwendolyn Brooks wrote in ’68 to mark 150 years of statehood. Betts’ broadside will be given to the winners of the Gwendolyn Brooks Youth Poetry Awards (#GWBYPA19) on August 10th, 2019.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has agreed to a two-book deal with Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group. His first young-adult book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight between America and Hitler, was released in June. In its review, Booklist calls the book “a knockout.” School Library Journal says it “reads as smoothly as a novel” and recommends it for “all public and school libraries.” Last week, John and his writing partner (and wife), Ouisie Shapiro, discussed the book’s themes on ESPN radio; you can hear the interview here.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) was interviewed by novelist Kris Jansma for Electric Literature, which called his novel Nirvana Is Here “a pure joy to read on every page.” The Rupture also published a glowing review of Nirvana, calling it “an expertly written, bold, funny, serious novel.” DC fans, take note: on July 3rd, Aaron will be on a panel at the legendary Ask Rayceen Show doors opening at 6:00 p.m. He’ll also be teaching Publishing 101 at the Writer’s Center on July 10th, 7:00-9:00 p.m., as well as a special class on the novel Landfall by Thomas Mallon at Politics and Prose on July 14th, 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will accept the Grand Master Award, presented by the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers, at San Diego Comic-Con on July 19 at 2:00 p.m. in Room 32 AB. There will be an autograph session afterwards with a panel of tie-in writers in the Sails Pavilion. Here is the press release from the association:

Not many women get to play in over ten different universes, let alone create several of their own. Yet that is exactly what Nancy Holder makes look so very—and deceptively—easy to her myriad and devoted fans.

Every year, the International Association of Media Tie-In writers selects a grandmaster of tie-in writing to receive the Faust, IAMTW’s lifetime achievement award. For 2019, it is the IAMTW’s great pleasure to present the Faust to Nancy Holder. Her tie-in work runs the gamut from Firefly to Saving Grace. She’s written Angel in the Buffyverse, and Zorro in the seventeenth century. She novelized the Wonder Woman, Crimson Peak, and Ghostbusters movies, and wrote about a Feline Felon, and a pup in Wishbone. Above and beyond her media work, she’s co-created the YA series Wicked and Crusade.

Of the Bram Stoker award-winning and NYT bestselling author, IAMTW president Jonathan Maberry says, “Nancy is not only a superb writer and a smart businesswoman, but also a kind and compassionate member of the writing community.”

The IAMTW congratulates Grandmaster Nancy Holder on receiving the 2019 Faust Award.

More film news for Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting): her screenplay A Four-Sided Bed won Best Dramatic Screenplay at Hollywood Boulevard Film Festival in June, as well as Best First Time Feature Screenplay at Festivious Film Festival-LA, and was a Finalist at the Filmatic Drama Screenplay Awards. Over a dozen contests and festivals have given award recognition to Elizabeth’s script this year. The script will be featured in a full Staged Reading performance at the 15th Annual ReelHeART International Film and Screenplay Festival on July 5th in Toronto; Elizabeth will attend the film festival and do a Q/A after the staged reading. Later in July, Elizabeth’s script will be featured in a Best Scenes short read at the festival LGBT Toronto. Please see the updated website: http://www.afoursidedbedfilm.com

ALUMS

Jillian Abbott (Popular Fiction, S’04) has been invited to participate on a panel on the Ethics of Storytelling at Mix Digital, an international conference of digital writing at Bath Spa University in the UK on Monday, July 1, 2019; she also received a grant from the PSC_CUNY to attend the conference. The panel is moderated by writer Nikesh Shukladescribed by Foreign Affairs Magazine as one of the top 100 thinkers in the world and by The Bookseller as one of the 100 most influential people in publishing. Also on the panel is Digital Curator from the British Museum, Stella Wisdom, and British novelist Rosie Garland. More details can be found here.

The short-film adaptation of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) memoir, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, has three launches in July. The film’s Australian launch is at the Revelation Perth International Film Festival July 4-17. Two New England launches follow at the Maine International Film Festival at Railroad Square (July 12-21) and then the Woods Hole Film Festival (July 27-August 3). Bailey wrote and directed the film. For more details see wildsnailfilm.org. Also, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating has just been published in Spain in both Catalan (Més Libres) and Spanish (Capitán Swing) and the Spanish edition will have distribution in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Costa Rica, Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Derek Lubangakene’s story “Origami Angels” for the June 13th episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled that her novella, The Rampant, now has both a cover and release date! The Rampant will be released by Aqueduct Press on October 1st, 2019, in both an ebook and paperback edition as part of their Conversation Pieces series.

It’s ten years since the hordes of old-world Sumerian gods arrived in Southern Indiana to kick off the end of the world, but things have not gone to plan. A principal player decided not to show. Now humanity is stuck in a seemingly never-ending apocalypse. Sixteen-year-old Emelia Bareilles and Gillian Halkey are determined to travel into the lands of the dead and force a change.

“I loved the epic journey of our two teenaged lesbian he­roes, Gillian and Emelia, through the sprawling horrors of the Sumerian afterworld. The clash of their modern feminist sensibilities with the cruel and rigid theocracy of the very oldest gods out-weirds much of the New Weird. In The Rampant, Julie Day calls us to visit a fan­tastical landscape in a voice that is hers alone.” ~James Patrick Kelly, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards

The Rampant was so much fun to read! Is that the right way to blurb a horror novel? I don’t know, but it’s the truth. Julie Day’s novel is smart, playful, sly and, yes, hor­rifying too. A short gem of a book.” ~Victor LaValle, author of The Changeling. Winner of the World Fantasy, Shirley Jackson, and British Fantasy awards.

“The girl-powered post-apocalyptic Sumerian under­world quest I didn’t know I needed.” ~Sarah Pinsker, winner of the Nebula and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award

The Rampant is one of the most original Apocalypse tales I’ve read in ages. Julie C. Day avoids cliché and gives the reader the end-times by way of Sumerian myth—except this particular end-of-the-world stalls when one of its principal players decides not to show up. What unfolds is a journey into the underworld filled with joy and hor­ror, hope and loss. It’s a wise and lovely story—exactly what I’ve come to expect from Day.” ~Nathan Ballingrud, winner of the Shirley Jackson Award; shortlisted for the World Fan­tasy, British Fantasy, and Bram Stoker Awards.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) poem “Waiting for the Lazuli Bunting” was published in the Spring 2019 issue of Birdland Journal, and her poem “Spirit Bear” will be published in the upcoming Marin Poetry Center Anthology. Terri also taught a workshop on the history of haiku for the summer residency of the MFA program at Dominican University in June 2019.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce Catskill Lit: Words & Music Revivala generative writing retreat.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) started his production company, Alan W. King Productions, which specializes in audio, video, literary services, marketing and content management. For authors, his services include book trailerssocial media banner designs to help promote your book, and media outreach for reviews. Alan marketed his second book, Point Blank, which was named among the “Ten Best Poetry Books for 2016” by Beltway Poetry Journal. It was also listed among “The Best Poetry Books of the New Year 2017” by Washington Independent Review of Books and was reviewed in publications such as the Washington City Paper and the Best American Poetry blog. Learn more here.

Kristin Leonard (Fiction, S’18) received the 2019 Maine Literary Award for Drama.

Jeanette Lynes‘ (Poetry/Fiction, S’05) second novel, The Small Things that End the World, won the Muslims for Peace and Justice Fiction Award at the 2019 Saskatchewan Book Awards, Canada.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash-fiction piece, “A Miracle Shy of Martyrdom,” is forthcoming in Necessary Fiction. John is currently in residency as a Teaching Apprentice at Stonecoast.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) is organizing the first annual Fall Writerfest at the Pyramid Life Center in Paradox, NY, Sunday, September 22nd, through Friday September 27th, 2019. Fee is $300 inclusive of lodging, all meals, workshops, and seminars. Stonecoaster Clif Travers (Popular Fiction, S’17) will be teaching fiction, Ellie will be teaching a multi-genre workshop, and there will also be workshops in poetry and CNF along with seminars on publishing, Tai Chi, writing through grief, and more to be added.

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W’18) is thrilled to have been recently awarded a 2019 Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council and plans to use the grant to spend more time writing. She’s also deeply proud to have her story “Sour Milk Girls,” which was previously selected to be in The Best Science Fiction of the Year, Vol. 4, also selected to be in The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2019. Finally, her 2018 short story “The Grays of Cestus V,” originally in Asimov’s, is now available free to the masses through its inclusion in the short story podcast Tales from A Black Universe—links here (Spotify) and here (Apple).

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S ’08), will lead a one-day workshop, “Dialogue and Scene for Prose Writers,” with Cedar Ridge Writers Series, in Bedminster, NJ, on Saturday, July 20th. Details here.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) invites writers of all stripes who are looking for a good editor to contact her. For the last five years she has worked as a developmental editor on a number of wonderful books that have been published by the University of California Press, focusing mostly on race and gender studies. She’s also edited half a dozen creative nonfiction books, a couple YA novels, and poetry. Authors she’s worked with include Michael Kimmel, Khaled Beydoun, Deepak Singh, Julie Bettie, Barbara Owen, and Robert Wyrod. She works on a generous sliding scale, and is especially interested in working with artists who are isolated socially or geographically, and with intellectuals whose work centers on social justice. She is happy to work with clients for just an hour or two, or for a year, or on an as-needed basis. Please contact her at tamieparkersong@gmail.com.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) won a $500 Merit Scholarship to attend Tinker Mountain Writers Workshop held recently at Hollins University. The award was based on an excerpt from a novel in progress.

 

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Community News & Updates October 2016

ATTENTION: ALUMNI

The 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion Committee wants to hear from you! Led by co-chairs Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Frank Ard (Popular Fiction, S’14), Peter Maskaluk (Fiction, ’13), Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06), and Mihku Anderson (Fiction, S’10), Stonecoast is excited to celebrate 15 years in the literary community. Please fill out this brief survey with your attendance and preferences: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/86MCNWV

stonecoast-reunion-final

A message from the husband of Christine Tierney (Poetry, S’09), who is currently in need of a kidney.

Dear Family, Friends, and Universe,

Christine is a caring, generous, and beautiful person with probably the best sense of humor on the planet. She has been working with children for the past 23 years as an after school director. She is also a gifted poet, artist, and animal lover. But most of all, she is the absolute love of my life.

Eight years ago Christine was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease, (PKD). PKD is progressive and incurable. It causes clusters of cysts to grow inside the kidneys. As these cysts enlarge from fluid buildup, kidney failure can result. Unfortunately, Christine’s cysts are rapidly growing and her kidneys are losing function. She is now in need of a kidney transplant.

Christine was placed on the national kidney transplant list in August 2015, and is awaiting a deceased donor kidney, but this list is 80,000 names long, and the wait time for a deceased donor kidney is eight years or more. Christine is hoping for a transplant from a living donor because living donor kidneys have greater success rates than deceased donor kidneys, and nearly double the years of function. Through the living donation program, a healthy person can donate one of their kidneys and return to full health after a brief recovery.

I was tested to see if I am a match for Christine. Unfortunately, I am not. Both of Christine’s parents are now too old for organ donation. Finally, you may have read the article is The Boston Globe about a former Cambridgeport parent who was willing to donate and was a likely match, but has since been diagnosed with a medical condition that makes her an unsuitable donor.

So now we are casting our net wider, in hopes of finding someone who might be interested in donating a kidney to Christine. This would be a great gift to the both of us.

If you cannot do this, we understand perfectly. If you know anyone who might, please forward this letter widely. We are so grateful to you for passing it along to your family, friends, coworkers or classmates, congregation, or any other communities to which you belong. Also, please feel free to post this on all forms of social media.

If you would like to learn more about living kidney donation, please feel free to call me at (857) 334-9794 or email me at ljblanko@yahoo.com.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart,

Luis Julio Blanco

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W ’12) will present a seminar entitled “Archetypes and the Power of Attraction: Creating Dynamic Characters and Conflict in Fiction” to the Maine Romance Writers Association on October 8th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to report she is now an official Affiliate Member of the Horror Writer’s Association (her sale to Gamut last month made her eligible and her application was accepted!). Two of her Halloween recipes “Mummy Calzones” and “Witches Wands” will appear in the next issue of the HWA newsletter with accompanying photos. She’s also excited her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” originally published in Parsec’s Triangulations: Beneath the Surface will be reprinted in Cosmic Shores and Eldritch Tales this fall. Furthermore, her science fiction romance poem “The Blind Elephants of Io” was selected for performance at Arachnae Press’s Shortest Day: Solstice Shorts Festival 2016 funded by the Arts Council of England, in Greenwich on Wednesday, December 21, and will be published in a subsequent anthology of collected writings accepted by the show—this poem won a Long Form Honorable Mention in the 2016 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest. A reprint of Karen’s haunted house abduction micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in IronSoap.com’s 200CCs Issue #4 on October 7. Finally, Karen is thrilled to report she’s been asked to write an essay for Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s tenth anniversary Kickstarter.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay published in the Fall issue of The Journal.

9781608933952Kate Cone (Fiction, ’08) announces the publication of What’s Brewing in New England (Down East Books, Camden, ME), a guide to craft breweries in the six-state region. Kate’s first edition of What’s Brewing was published in 1997. After almost 20 years, Kate revisits the explosive New England beer scene with interviews, stories and descriptions of the beers. Available on Amazon.

For the second year in a row, a Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay has been named as a Notable in Best American Essays. This year, her piece “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” (which won a Maine Literary Award and was nominated for a Pushcart) made the notables list; the piece was a Sunday Rumpus Essay in July 2015. Penny’s book, Postcards from Here, just received a glowing review at Tinderbox Poetry Journal. Here is an excerpt from the review: “… the postcards come to the reader as precious objects assembled in a gorgeous yet unruly box. Here, all at once, we experience the lived chaos of mind, marriage, children, body, and place. It is a truth, a difficult representation to achieve, and Guisinger does so with skill and grace. Postcards From Here reminds us that a postcard’s purpose is not memory or story, but to send a small piece of oneself as a memento, rather than a definitive record or missive.”

Andrea Lani‘s (Fiction, W’14) essay “Monarch Summers” appeared in the Spring-Autumn issue of Snowy Egret. She also had two essays published online this month: “The Big Night” at Coffee + Crumbs and “How I Went from Domestic to Wild” at Role Reboot.

Will Ludwigsen’s (Popular Fiction, W’11) story “The Leaning Lincoln” is appearing in the October/November 2016 double issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction; he describes the story as “an autobiographical journey into the psyche of a boy coming to terms with the absence of magical justice in the world.” He also sold his story “Night Fever” to Asimov’s, too, and it’s likely to appear later in 2017.

9843219Alexis Paige‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in 2015, has been named a Best American Essays Notable in the 2016 anthology. In addition, Paige’s first book, Not a Place on Any Map, which won the 2016 Vine Leaves Press Vignette Collection Award, will be published December 5th by Vine Leaves Press. The book, a collection of lyric essays, will be available for pre-order in early November.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was honored to learn that one of her essays was selected for the Notables Essays section of Best American Essays 2016. (The piece, “Not Quite Meet Cute,” originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Blue Lyra Review.) Lisa’s essay, “On the Near Side of the Tracks,” appears in the current (Fall 2016) issue of Brevity.

Beyond Rain Man by Anne K. Ross (pen name for Creative Nonfiction, Winter ’07 graduate) is reviewed by Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) in the current issue of Mom Egg Review; the book review can be found here. Also, Anne will be on a LitQuake “Politics of Parenting” panel in the San Francisco Bay Area on October 9. Other events listed at www.beyondrainman.com.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz‘s (Fiction, S’09) novel, In the Context of Love, is a 2016 Readers’ Favorite Book Award Finalist. That marks the third award for the book she worked on while at Stonecoast.

Wilde Stories 2016Bonnie Jo Stufflebeams (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

Ashley K. Warren‘s (Fiction, S ’12) poem “Symptoms of a Brain Injury” was nominated by Easy Street for the 2016 Best of the Net anthology. Also, Ashley will serve as an artist in residence at the Billings Public Library in Billings, Montana, beginning in October. During her residency she will work with teen writers on the Letters to the Next President project, an initiative hosted by the National Writing Project, KQED, public media, and Educator Innovator partners.

Lindsey Wells (publishes as Lindsey Kemp; Creative Nonfiction, S’15) won the Empire Award (second place) in the New York Screenplay Contest for her New Girl spec script, “B.C.,” which she wrote as part of her third semester project under the guidance of the amazing Mike Kimball.

FACULTY

Letters from LimboJeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) new book of poetry, Letters from Limbo, will be launching this month from CavanKerry Press. Additional information can be found on Jeanne Marie’s website.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Guiltless Pleasures” has been accepted for publication in Crazyhorse Magazine. Aaron’s essay “Edward Albee Was My Mailman,” a tribute to the late playwright who wrote Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and many others, is in The Millions. In other news, Aaron will be delivering a presentation on Drown by Junot Diaz for Hispanic Heritage Month at the DC Public Library. And last but not least, if you’re in the DC area and having trouble with writer’s block, come to Aaron’s two-session class at Politics & Prose Bookstore, Breaking Through Writer’s Block.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just returned from a book tour in Sweden, where her novels Generation Loss and Available Dark (briefly) topped the bestseller list at #1 and #3 (the new Harry Potter was #4). In September, she’ll be featured at the National Book festival in Washington, DC, where she’ll be interviewed by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, and will also appear at the Fall for the Book festival in Fairfax, Virginia. Recent reviews include Tama Janowitz’s memoir Scream for The Los Angeles Times and Nisi Shawl’s novel Everfair for The Washington Post.

As noted in a previous Community blog, October 1 will see the debut of two new works by Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction). His short play “Glitch” premieres as part of the Paragon Science Fiction and Fantasy Theater festival at the The Public House Theatre in Chicago. And his novelette “One Sister, Two Sisters, Three” will be published in the Tenth Anniversary Issue of Clarkesworld Magazine.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play The Secret of Comedy runs October 20-30 (Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:00 p.m.) at Mayo Street Arts, Mayo Street, Portland, ME. For more information and reservations, click here.

the-secret-of-comedy

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) lyric essay “Some Things About that Day” was featured in Becoming a Great Essayist, a twenty-four part online “Great Courses” lecture series taught by the literary scholar Jennifer Cognard-Black (2016). Her essay “The Microphone Erotic” was published in the anthology From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women Writers and Their Machines (Michigan State University Press, 2016), and her essay “When the Band Broke Up” was awarded the 2016 Alligator Juniper Nonfiction Prize and was published in Alligator Juniper, Issue XX, 2016. In July and August 2016, Debra was invited to complete a month long artist residency at Le Moulin à Nef, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts location in Auvillar, France. Working with the painter Thomas Rice, Debra worked on a collaborative research nonfiction project about the oil boom in her home state of North Dakota, entitled “The Future Eaters.”

Tickets are now on sale for the six-week Chicago run of Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera; recent media coverage has included a Chicago Tribune piece that included the show on a Theater Preview list of “Tuneful Treats.” For ticket info, visit Theater Wit.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

 

 

 

 

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