Tag Archives: J. Stephen Rhodes

Community News & Updates July 2020

FACULTY

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote his latest piece on sports and civil rights for The Nation: “When the KKK Played Against an All-Black Baseball Team.” His next book will be for young adults and is slated for release in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana Is Here received a Bronze Medal in the 2019 Foreword Reviews Indie Book Awards!

Elizabeth Hand’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Curious Toys is a finalist for both the Locus and Shirley Jackson Awards. The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel (due in September), has received great advance trade reviews, including a starred review from Booklist.  Hand recently wrote about John Garth’s The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places that Inspired Middle-earth for The Washington Post.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Faithful Sister” was published in Daily Science Fiction on June 17.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is one of six writers who formed the group Writers Against Racial Injustice to raise funds for The Equal Justice Initiative. The group started with a goal of raising 10K and have wound up raising over 50K, with help from many supporters including Stonecoasters and coverage in The Boston Globe, Shelf Awareness, and a feature article on June 24 in Publishers Weekly. The fundraiser is running through July 4th; donations are welcome here.

The publication date for Robert V.S. Redick’s (Popular Fiction) new epic fantasy novel, Sidewinders (sequel to Master Assassins), has just been announced: it will be on the shelves on May 4, 2021, from Talos Press.

 

ALUMS

One of Jillian Abbott’s (Popular Fiction, S’04) students, Hastride Eduoard, was profiled for the animation project she submitted for her final project in Jillian’s ENG 384 RC Writing for Electronic Media class (Hastride’s video is at the end of the article).

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) is thrilled to announce that her short story “A Seed Planted” has been translated in Japanese for Night Land Quarterly Vol. 21 “The Fantasy of Sky Realms.” This short story was originally included in the anthology Hath No Fury, edited by Melanie R. Meadors. She also has a reprint of her flash piece “The Landscape of Lacrimation” included in the Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES, edited by Julie C. Day. Both of these stories were originally drafted during her time at Stonecoast.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been long-listed for the Sunburst Award for her story “When the White Bird Sings,” published last year in Augur. In addition, the ephemera Reading Series is a finalist for the Aurora Award, under Best Fan Organizational.

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) will have a story, “The Keeper of the Marsh,” published in the July issue of The Scarlet Leaf Review.

Libby Cudmore (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) has sold her second story, “A Brief History of Local Warfare,” to Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine. Her first, “All Shook Down,” is scheduled for publication in the September/October issue of EQMM.

teri elam’s (Poetry, S’19) personal essay “On Asking Mama To Pray for Me” will be included in the forthcoming anthology, Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort During the Time of COVID-19 which is raising money for indie bookstores. Stonecoast professor Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) is a contributor as well.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) new book of poems, Being Animal (published by Aldrich Press), is now available for purchase through kelsaybooks.com and Amazon. These poems observe and embody a vast array of animals from the honeybee to the mountain lion in poems that celebrate their beauty, grieve their loss, and reflect on their wisdom. For a signed copy, please visit www.terriglass.com. Derrick Jensen, author of A Language Older than Words and Endgame, says, “A love for wild nature suffuses this beautiful collection. Poetry can serve no more important purpose than to rekindle our love of those who are wild.”

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) has had poems published or accepted for publication in Main Street Rag, Clementine Unbound, Green Hills Lantern, and Arcturus. She has also launched a website with co-editor Pit Pinegar dedicated to providing writing exercises for those who need them. The exercises were contributed by writers who teach. Anyone who has published work and teaches and is interested in contributing an exercise can contact her at barbarapgreenbaum@gmail.com for more details.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) is happy to announce that her memoir, She Said God Blessed Us: A Life Marked by Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Church, will be published by Exposit in August. Many people at Stonecoast helped in the writing of this book. Here’s what fellow alum Elliot Long (Creative Nonfiction, S’10), now with the Emmett Till Interpretive Center, has to say about the memoir: “In She Said God Blessed Us, Gail Hovey introduces us to a firebrand who confronts her world with a fierceness and determination to fight for change. As she participates in several of the pivotal social justice movements of our times, from the fight against American racism in the 1960s to the campaign to end South African apartheid in the decades that followed, Hovey grows to recognize how abuse of power also shaped her young life—abuse at the hands of her religious mentor. Wrenching and celebratory, Hovey’s memoir depicts a long struggle to move through guilt and pain toward a peace she can claim as her own.” For more information and to order an advance copy, please visit Gail’s website.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has won the Neosho Arts Council’s short story contest for her story “December 1, 1969.” Judge Kevin Dilmore said, “A relatable protagonist and a suspenseful construction make this story a compelling read from the beginning. Backstory is introduced at a great pace just when readers will benefit the most from it. This is an enjoyable and thought-provoking read, and images from this will stay with readers for a long time.”

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created four new poetry videos. The videos for “Beacon” and “Into the Light,” inspired by the poems of the same names, go into Alan and his wife’s battle with lupus, Alan doing a kidney swap to help his wife, and their surgeries. “Heartbreak is Unavoidable” is inspired by Alan’s poem “This Good”; and “A Poem for My New Born and George Floyd” is inspired by Alan’s new poem “The Land of Innocence,” which he wrote for his one-month-old daughter and George Floyd. You can watch the videos here.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) is especially happy to have an essay, “Saying Goodbye to Seafood,” published in Tablet Magazine, where her writing has been rejected several times in the past. This reminded her to never give up and to submit, submit, submit.

Julia Munemo (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) and Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be hosted by World Fellowship Center for a virtual reading and conversation about Writing from a Family Legacy on Monday, July 6, 7:00-8:00 p,m. Julia will read from her debut memoir The Book Keeper and Ellen from her new novel Her Sister’s Tattoo. Details and link here.

An excerpt from Julia McKenzie Munemo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) memoir The Book Keeper appeared on Public Seminar in June.

dg nanouk okpik’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “If Oil Is Drilled in Bristol Bay” was featured in the Poetry Foundation’s Poem of the Day email on June 5, 2020.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) will have her poem “That Poetry Thing” in the Summer 2020 issue of Ibbetson Street Magazine.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “La Ride,” written in French, will appear with his English translation in the forthcoming anthology from Flying Ketchup Press. His poem “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgements” is forthcoming in Main Street Rag’s anthology Show Us Your Papers. And his poem  “My Grandfather’s Sky” will appear in North Scene Poetry Press’s anthology of poetry about 9/11.

The prose poem “Mountain” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) will appear in the Fall/Winter issue of New South.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that as of today he is the Assistant Principal at Hinsdale Middle High School in Hinsdale, New Hampshire. In writing news, his essay “Hattery: The Many Roles of a First-Time Teacher” was accepted into Voices of Practice to be published later in 2020.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) has signed a new book deal for his novel Celestine with Encircle Publications. It’s expected to be in bookstores in May 2021.

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a short story titled “The Sea of Stars” in the new anthology Retellings of the Inland Seas from Candlemark and Gleam, edited by Athena Andreadis; and, an essay titled “Ghosts, Grimoires, and Dealing with Demons: Hellblazer’s Real-World Magic” in the new book From Bayou to Abyss: Examining John Constantine, Hellblazer from Sequart, edited by Lou Tambone and Rich Handley.

 

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Community News & Updates June 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE STONECOAST MFA VIRTUAL WRITING SERIES
Join us Monday, June 8th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. for “Rolled in Sugar: Food as an Entry into a Moment” with Stonecoast Director Justin Tussing. Like Proust’s madeleine, we’ll talk about food and writing and where both can take us. Link to join is here. The Stonecoast Virtual Writing Series is an effort to connect our community and continue learning together from afar. Led by a faculty member or guest instructor, sessions are held monthly.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Lauren Erin O’Brien‘s (Fiction, S’20) poem “After She Reads the Court Records” is forthcoming in the Fall/Winter 2020 issue of Witness.

 

FACULTY

Martín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new collection of poems, called Floaters, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January 2021.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about sports, crime, and social issues. In May, he wrote a feature about baseball for ESPN’s The Undefeated: J.L. Wilkinson Stood Out as the Only White Owner in the First Official Negro League. His next young-adult book is due out in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists wrongly convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) forthcoming Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, was named one of fall’s most anticipated titles by CrimeReads/LitHub. She was interviewed by The Coode Street Podcast, discussing pandemic reading. Her recent reviews include Megan Capisi’s Sin Eater and N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became, both for The Washington Post.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) was profiled in The San Diego Union Tribune on Saturday, May 24.

Authors Ryan Craig Bradford and Nancy Holder

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and her theater cohorts are finding ways for the Shows to Go On in these challenging times: Michael Teoli, composer and “co-conspirator” with Elizabeth on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, performed two of his and Elizabeth’s songs from their rock opera in May on the Los Angeles-based Stealing Focus Digital Cabaret.
In a new May interview, the stars of the 2020 TheatreZone production of Tonya & Nancy—Whitney Winfield and Nikki Miller—discuss their “joyous” experience doing the rock opera in February and also the new realities of the theater world since then, on ZoomIntoTheZone.

Elizabeth and composer Michael Teoli, who did the music on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, with book & lyrics by Elizabeth

Join Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) online June 1 at 1:00 p.m. for a conversation with Meredith O’Brien, author of the newly released Uncomfortably Numb, her memoir on the life-altering diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and on the practice of narrative medicine. The free event will include some details about Bay Path University’s upcoming Narrative Medicine Certificate. Please register for the webinar here.

 

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, was mentioned in a recent New York Times essay by Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk. Macdonald’s essay on pandemic quarantine and birdwatching is available at this link.

Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction, W’19) was interviewed on episode 92 of a podcast called Thrill Seekers Radio with Alex Dolan to help advertise The Jack Harper Trilogy (Pivot, Perish, and Peak).

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) appeared at the 2020 SFWA Nebula Conference on the “Finishing What You Didn’t Start: Editors Making Projects Their Own” panel.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) had a short story published in the May-June issue of Uncanny Magazine called “Through the Veil.”

J Brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) essay “Kaden has Covid” was a winner of Beyond Words Literary Magazine’s Dream Challenge and appears in the June issue online and in hard copy (essay can also be read in eir website jbrookewrites.com).

The ephemera reading series has gone virtual! Co-chaired by KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) and editor Jen R. Albert, ephemera is a monthly reading series showcasing diverse SFF. Catch the next event on June 17th, 7:00 p.m. ET, live on YouTube. ephemera was also recently nominated for an Aurora Award in the Best Fan Organizational category. It is funded by the Ontario Arts Council.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce the charity anthology Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES is now available as both a paperback and ebook! This book is a culmination of a long year of work and a lot of help from some amazing creatives with Julie at the helm as Editor-in-Chief. Playful, whimsical, or dark, but always thoughtful and tinged with the inexplicably weird, the Weird Dream Society brings together twenty-three stories from the most innovative creators in speculative fiction, including Nathan Ballingrud, Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Gregory Norman Bossert, Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), Christopher Brown, Emily Cataneo, Julie C. Day, Michael J Deluca, Gemma Files, A.T. Greenblatt, Nin Harris, Chip Houser, James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty), Marianne Kirby, Kathrin Köhler, Matthew Kressel, Jordan Kurella, Premee Mohamed, Sarah Read, Sofia Samatar, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13), Steve Toase, and A.C. Wise. All proceeds from the anthology go to RAICES, which envisions a compassionate society where all people have the right to migrate and human rights are guaranteed.
Paperback: Amazon | Barnes&Noble | IndieBound.org
eBook: Amazon | Kobo | B&N Nook | Weightless Books
What Others Are Saying

  • “I adore it…These stories are what weird should be. Each one is a different subgenre and [yet] its own beast all together…I’m just feeling electrified by the stories in this collection…they are all connected in the places that matter. They are weird, they are genre, and they contain fantastic prose I’ll keep coming back to over and over again.” ~Paul Jessup, Vernacular Books Guest Review
  • “..the dream-like quality of the stories delivers on the promise of the title….the collection as a whole weaves in moments of profound strangeness, places where the rules of the universe seem to bend and buckle….There are ghosts of a shopping mall, and little girls with superpowers, and a man who can change skins….For fans of dark fantasy and science fiction, there’s a whole lot to like….And there are still moments of hope and clarity, tucked in among the shattered dreams the collection catalogs.” ~Charles Payseur, Quick Sip Reviews  

In addition to the anthology, Julie’s story “After the Apocalypse There Will Be Memory Poems” can now be found in the May 3rd issue of Vol.1 Brooklyn as part of their Sunday Stories series. This is a redrafted version of a piece from Julie’s thesis and a story that demanded a home. Julie’s story “Speculative Execution” is out this month in the anthology The Way of the Laser: Future Crime Stories, edited Stonecoast alums Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) and Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11). It’s a story about A.I.-infused glass, theft, and friendship in a networked city where no one is entirely alone.

Jessica de Koninck‘s (Poetry, S’11) poem “Virtual Seder” was a winner in the Writer’s Almanac Pandemic Poetry Contest. In an interview, Garrison Keillor discussed the poem with her as well as reading her poem “Repairs.” The full Zoom interview can be seen on the Writer’s Almanac website.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) published a flash creative nonfiction piece, “The Simplest Recipe,” in Hippocampus.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) won a Nebula Award in the category of Game Writing for his work on The Outer Worlds, a spacefaring RPG that values player agency, player choice, and tells a story as morbid as it is fun. This is Paul’s first nomination, his first award, and as of writing this he’s celebrating with his cat. He’s currently working on an expansion to the game, launch date TBD.

Nylah Carpenter Lyman (Poetry, S’10) has had a poem titled “Making a Field” selected for Poetic License, a written word and visual arts exhibition, managed in collaboration by The Poetry Barn and the Arts Society of Kingston, NY. The process first involved having her poem chosen by the editorial team at Poetic License as a finalist.  Those poems were then forwarded on to visual artists at ASK. Once there, her poem was one of those selected by a visual artist, and so it will be mounted with the artist’s interpretation in an exhibition to be held in August 2020 at ASK’s gallery. If possible, the poets will be invited to come and read at the exhibition’s opening. The poems, and the paintings that were inspired by them, will be posted in a special issue on our sister site, The Poetry Distillery. While the gallery has been closed due to the COVID-19 crisis, they plan to reopen in June.

The Next Generation Indie Book Awards picked Tom MacDonald’s (Fiction, W’09) Dermot Sparhawk crime series—The Charlestown Connection (2011), Beyond the Bridge (2103), The Revenge of Liam McGrew (2015), Murder in the Charlestown Bricks (2018)—as a finalist in the series category. Also, the crime anthology Coast to Coast: Noir will publish a Dermot Sparhawk short story called “Nashua River Floater” in its 2020 edition, due out in June.

Daily Science Fiction published Dan McMinn’s (Popular Fiction, W’20) short story “Advice for Newbies at WoodCon” on May 5th.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W‘06) is pleased to have her short story “Gridlock” in the spring 2020 issue of Solstice Magazine. It was wonderful working with Lee Hope again!

Starting Saturday, June 6th, Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be teaching Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life, a weekly live Zoom class for five Saturdays, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EDT. For more information, click here.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) creative nonfiction piece, “Things You Gave Me When You Left,” is online at The Real Story. Also, John was recently interviewed for a quarantine podcast by the folks at DUM DUM Zine, where it will be featured online shortly.

The concrete poem “Tree,” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the next issue of The Comstock Review.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Barking Dog Nocturnal” appeared in The Offing.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) short story “What Remains” was recently published in Volume 26 of Quarter After Eight. Her short story “Eve” was named a finalist for Iron Horse Review‘s Trifecta Award in Fiction. Her memoir, The Angle of Flickering Light, has been accepted by Vine Leaves Press and is forthcoming in April 2021.

“Church Camp,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Spring 2020 issue of Trajectory, a journal based in Frankfort, KY.

 

 

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Community News & Updates November 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ALUMNI RESIDENCY WORKSHOP: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP IN FICTION AND CREATIVE NONFICTION

This January, Stonecoast is offering a personalized writing experience for our Alumni.  Held in conjunction with the Stonecoast winter residency, Susan Conley will lead workshops that get alums to immerse in their writing within a peer setting again. Participants will generate new work as well as discuss old work. It is our hope that you will get to see your writing from new vantage points and that you’ll leave the residency feeling inspired. The conference fee includes four 2.5 hour workshop sessions, plus full access to all presentations, seminars, readings, pop-up classes, reception, and special events. You’ll also get a one-on-one meeting with New York agent Stephanie Koven.

  • Dates: January 10-January 14, 2020
  • Cost: $650.00 workshop fee, plus room and board (~$750 for 4 nights) or commuter fee ($285). Includes daily lunches and afternoon tea at the Harraseeket Inn.
  • Contact Jenny O’Connell to reserve your spot! There are only 8 slots available, and we expect this workshop to fill quickly.

STONECOAST AT AWP

Do you plan on attending the 2020 AWP conference (March 4-7) in San Antonio? Contact Special Programs Coordinator Jenny O’Connell to be added to the list of attending Stonecoasters! As part of the new Stonecoast WISE (Writing for Inclusion and Social Equity) Initiative, all Stonecoast students, alumni, and faculty are invited to a WISE reading and discussion in San Antonio. Time and location TBD. We hope to see you there!

FACULTY

Tom Coash’s (Scriptwriting) play Thin Air has recently been published by Brooklyn Publishers. His play Raghead will be produced in Bronx, NY, as part of the Urban Waves Festival by the Open Hydrant Theater Company, November 11-17.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about sports, crime, and social issues. In October, he wrote a feature for ESPN’s The Undefeated: Red Sox’s Raquel Ferreira Breaks Through Baseball’s Glass Ceiling. He also recently signed a two-book YA deal with Macmillan Children’s Group. The first will tell the controversial story of Sacco & Vanzetti, two Italian anarchists wrongly convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) has been awarded an arts and humanities fellowship from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities for 2020. The award, which supports individual artists who achieve excellence in the arts, was given on the basis of several selections from Aaron’s novel Nirvana Is Here. Also, Aaron will be presenting Nirvana Is Here at the National Press Club Book Fair on November 1st in Washington, DC.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) novel Curious Toys has received rave reviews from The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Chicago Review of Books, and CrimeReads, among others, and was named one of the Ten Books You Must Read Now by Oprah Magazine.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction emeritus) has been active in his retirement from Stonecoast. His short story “Selfless” appears in the current issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and is featured in the Asimov’s Spotlight podcast in which Jim reads the story in its entirety. His novelette “Grace’s Family” was published last month in The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2019 Edition. A new standalone novella, King of the Dogs, Queen of the Cats, is forthcoming in January from Subterranean Press in print  and Blackstone Publishing in audio. The novelette “The Boyfriend Experience” will be published in the Twelve Tomorrows anthology from M.I.T. Press this summer, and the story “The Man I Love” is slated for later in 2020 in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. When you read this, Jim will be in in Beijing as a guest of the Chinese government at the fourth annual China Science Fiction Conference (November 2-3), where he will give a presentation on teaching science fiction writers at Stonecoast and other programs.

Robert Levy’s (Popular Fiction) ghost story “The Vault of the Sky, the Face of the Deep” is included in Come Join Us By the Fire, a free audio anthology to celebrate the launch of Nightfire, a new horror imprint from Tor Books. More information about the anthology and the imprint can be found here.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and A Four-Sided Bed, her script in development as a feature film, were featured in the October issue of Imagine Magazine, a longtime publication for the New England Film Community. In other film news: Four-Sided, the short film based on Elizabeth’s novel, won Best Experimental Short and second place as Best Narrative Short in Vegas Movie Awards, and the short film is a Semi-Finalist at Blow-Up: The International Art-House Film Fest, along with having screenings upcoming at festivals in Pittsburgh and Chicago. Elizabeth’s feature script A Four-Sided Bed won Best Dramatic Screenplay at Vegas Movie Awards and was selected for a Best Scenes short reading at the Romance Film Festival.

Imagine Magazine‘s feature article on Elizabeth and A Four-Sided Bed

 

ALUMS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) has accepted a full-time position as an editor for Seven Seas Entertainment, the #1 independently owned manga publisher in North America. He will be at the World Fantasy Convention in L.A. from October 31st to November 3rd, where he will moderate the “Mixing Genres” panel (Friday, November 1st, at 1:00 p.m.) and appear on the “Beyond Castles, Horses and Knights: Non-Eurocentric Fantasy” panel (Saturday, November 2nd, at 12:00 p.m.).

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction faculty) and Debbie Lynn Smith Daughetee (Popular Fiction, S’04) would like to announce that Kymera Press is launching a Kickstarter in January 2020 for their title Mary Shelley Presents. The Kickstarter is to fund the printing of a trade paperback of all four issues (Nancy is the author and Debbie is the publisher). We hope you’ll help support us bringing back the voices of Victorian women horror writers in a unique and artful way.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) has been accepted to present a paper on space Jesuits at this year’s Northeast Modern Language Association conference in Boston (NeMLA). The paper is titled “Glory to the Machine God: Tech-priests as Future Jesuits in the Warhammer 40k Universe” and might be included as part of his PhD thesis on the intersection of science fiction and philosophy. Space Jesuits and Habermas! What a time to be alive.

Zachary Jernigan

Zachary Jernigan (Popular Fiction, W’11) has sold History of the Defeated, a novella, to LGBTQ+-focused publisher Lethe Press. In creative-adjacent news, he’ll also be appearing on the live taping of Nicole Byer’s (Netflix’s Nailed It!) podcast Why Won’t You Date Me? on November 14th at Tempe Improv in Tempe, AZ. Zack can be found on Twitter at @CriticalJams.

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be on the schedule for Windycon, a Chicago area SF convention (November 15-17), as follows:

  • Panel: Commerce in Space Opera — Friday, November 15th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. in Mueller Grand Ballroom G
  • Panel: Ask a Scientist — Saturday, November 16th, 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Lilac C
  • Chicago-SF Book discussion: Ringworld by Larry Niven — Saturday, November 16th, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in ISFiC Suite – Room 1612
  • Writers Workshop Moderator: Sunday — Sunday, November 17th, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in ISFiC Suite – Room 1612
  • Panel: Memorable Space Opera Settings — Sunday, November 17th, 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Mueller Grand Ballroom H

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has several articles in the 2020 Harris’ Farmer’s Almanac on newsstands now. This year’s Christmas romance novella, The Christmas Parade, is now available on Amazon. Favorable reviews welcome. 🙂

Teacher/Pizza Guy, the new poetry collection by Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09), was recently reviewed by The Ann Arbor Observer. Jeff will be reading on Wednesday, November 6th, at Nicola’s Books in Ann Arbor, MI, and on Wednesday, December 5th, at The White Plains Public Library in White Plains, NY.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) is looking for reviewers for his audiobook Drift, now available on Audible. He has promo codes for review copies (US and UK). Those interested should contact him at alanw.king@gmail.com. Please add “DRIFT Audiobook Review” in the subject line.

Tom MacDonald‘s (Fiction, W’09) short story “Nashua River Floater” will be published next June in Coast to Coast Noir, a crime anthology edited by Paul D. Marks and Andrew McAleer.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry W’17) has a poem “We Were a Family of Five When I Coughed” in the anthology The Hands We Hold: Poetry Concerning Breast Cancer.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short film Skin Deep, based on her screenplay and directed by Ryan Couldrey, recently won second prize at Port Horror Festival’s short film showcase. Her short film Rialia also premiered at the CineFAM Film Festival, and her short script Vomit Comet was featured in a live staged reading at Toronto Cold Reads.

For the second year running, Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, ‘12) won a journalism award in the annual Writers’ Digest Writing Competition. The first was for “Ginger Takes A Stand: A Life Lived With Polio,” the second “DNA Discoveries: Home Ancestry Tests are Rewriting Family Trees.” (Despite her commitment to finishing the novels she started at Stonecoast, Cynthia still loves writing for magazines.) In addition, Cynthia has had two non-fiction books published recently: The Purple Rose of Chelsea: Jeff Daniels and His Theater and Reach!, a business manual written for meta-franchiser John Rotche.

Two poems, “are you against me Boss” and “it’s dark outside Boss by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the forthcoming issue of Christianity and Literature. These poems are part of a new series of psalm-like poems inspired by Maurice Manning’s collection, Bucolics.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was recently interviewed by Nonfiction Reads. She’d love to see Stonecoast folks at I AM BOOKS, in Boston, on Saturday, November 9th, at 6:00 p.m., when she’s reading along with (fellow Stonecoast alum) Anthony D’Aires (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) and New Hampshire poet/author Jennifer Militello.

Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’06) has co-edited a book to be published this November by Littoral Books called A Dangerous New World: Maine Voices on the Climate Crisis. The book is an anthology of essays and poems by Maine writers on the topic of the climate catastrophe we are facing and can be purchased online, after November 15th, at Littoralbooks.com. On December 8th at 2:00 p.m. at Space, we will hold a publication party, and Kathleen would like to invite the Stonecoast community. Intended both as a work of art and as a call to action, the hope of the editors is that it wakes people to the enormous potential and already arrived losses a fossil fuel dependent world promises and, in the awakening, that people will be moved by their love for this place we call home to act. Kathleen has also had a poem, “Mrs. C and the Social Worker,” published in Cafe Review‘s Fall 30th Anniversary issue.

Darlene Taylor (Fiction, W’17) received an individual artist grant from the DC Commission on Arts and the Humanities. The merit-based grant supports her work as a literary artist during Fiscal Year 2020.

The Killing Moon, a novel written by Allister Timms (Popular Fiction, ’13) during his time at Stonecoast, was published on Halloween by PS Publishing, the UK’s foremost genre publisher.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates October 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SUBMISSIONS OPEN: The Learned Pig

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) is currently a guest editor at the UK magazine The Learned Pig. Her “Root Mapping” section is an exploration of mapping place instead of space. What is sparked when today’s mapping is guided by a desire for connection and beauty instead of domination, when maps are living creations that arise from engagement and attention? Submissions of poetry, literary nonfiction, photo essays, and interviews are all welcome through October 31st.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The Way of the Laser: Future Crime

Vernacular Books, an indie press venture created by Joe McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) and Eric Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) is pleased to announce they are accepting submissions for the anthology The Way of the Laser: Future Crime stories.

What we’re looking for: 

Crime stories that take place in the future. Preferably these stories will go beyond simple murders or capers to reveal something about how technology and the powers that wield it have changed our world. Is poisoning the nanobots responsible for programming the ads in your neural feed a crime? Is organized crime society’s only hope or responsible for its downfall? Consider what will constitute a crime and what unique problems it poses for your characters.

Keep in mind what is criminal behavior one day may be legal the next and vice versa. We want to see people caught up in the pitfalls of society ruled by corporations, ideologies, and demagogues and what lengths they will go to when there simply is no other choice.

Wow us with your original idea and blow us away with your writing.

Length: 4,000-8,000 words

Payment: $.05/word advance + royalties.

For SUBMISSION GUIDELINES visit www.vernacularbooks.com/submissions/

To support this project via Kickstarter, visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/vernacularbooks/the-way-of-the-laser-future-crime-stories 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jac Evans’ (Popular Fiction) short story “Scales” appeared in Issue 30 of Three-Lobed Burning Eye, published on August 30! This story was workshopped in her very first Stonecoast residency.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has signed a new book deal with Tu Books for his middle-grade solar-punk fantasy novel, The Shadow Prince. It won’t enter the world until some time in 2021, but he’s happy. In November, he’ll be a guest at the first Reno Pop Culture Con.

Aaron Hamburger‘s tour for Nirvana Is Here rolls on, with stops at Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, October 3rd; a reading and conversation at the Fall for the Book Festival at George Mason University at noon on Friday, October 11th; an appearance at the Rainbow Book Fair in New York on Saturday, October 12th; and a stop in Arlington, VA, for the Readings on the Pike reading series, Wednesday, October 15th at 7:30 p.m. Aaron will also be featured as part of the Detroit Public Library Author Series on Sunday, October 27th at 2:30 p.m., and will participate in the National Press Club Book Festival On Friday, November 1st. Keep up with all of Aaron’s latest events here.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction) novel Curious Toys, out October 15th, has received glowing early reviews, including raves from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus and starred reviews in Booklist and Library Journal, as well as advance praise from Audrey Niffenegger, Sarah Weinman, Peter Straub, and Bradford Morrow, among others. Liz will be appearing at the Strand Bookstore in New York City on October 16th, in conversation about the book with Benjamin Dreyer; at Solid State Books in D.C. with Michael Dirda on October 17th; at Anderson’s Bookstore in Chicago with Sarah Weinman on October 24th; and at the WORD Festival in Blue Hill, Maine, on October 26th, where she’ll be in conversation with Joe Hill and Laura Miller. Her forthcoming reviews include Rene Denfeld’s The Butterfly Girl in The Washington Post.

Cara Hoffman‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) debut children’s novel Bernard Pepperlin, out this fall from Harper Collins, was a Jr. Library Guild Selection, received a starred review in Kirkus, and earned glowing reviews in Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal which compared Bernard Pepperlin to books by Roald Dahl and E.B. White.

Robert Levy‘s (Popular Fiction) novella Anaïs Nin at the Grand Guignol is out this month from Lethe Press. Kirkus Reviews says, “Readers looking for a concentrated cocktail of Années folles splendor will find that this short erotic novel quenches their thirst. A finely crafted, Anaïs Nin–centered fantasy with unexpected depths,” while Publishers Weekly in a Starred Review writes, “Levy’s disquieting erotic imagery masterfully evokes Nin’s original prose. This sensual confection will enthrall readers looking for an intimate, disturbing thrill.”

Cate Marvin (Poetry) is this year’s editor of Best New Poets: 50 Poems from Emerging Writers, a series curated by Jed Livingood.

At the 2019 Massachusetts Independent Film Festival in September, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) won Best Feature Film Screenplay and the short film Four-Sided, based on Elizabeth’s novel, was screened on the Festival’s closing night, September 7th. Elizabeth attended the Festival with Amy Carpenter Scott, one of the producers developing Elizabeth’s script, A Four-Sided Bed, as a feature film. Also in September, Elizabeth’s script was named a Finalist at the Northeast Film Festival and the short film Four-Sided was a Finalist at Moondance International Film Festival. See updates here.

Elizabeth and A Four-Sided Bed producer Amy Carpenter Scott at the 2019 Massachusetts Independent Film Festival

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) film short adaptation of her memoir The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating won the international Jackson Wild Media Award in the Education category. The film has an upcoming Canadian premier at the Edmunton International Film Festival and was recently reviewed in the San Francisco Examiner.  

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) published two short stories recently: “Better” in The Saturday Evening Post and “The Escape Artists” in The Normal School.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) was awarded the inaugural Ladies of Horror Fiction (LOHF) Writers Grant, which was funded by indie author Steve Stred.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) and PodCastle co-editor Jen R. Albert are pleased to announce their creation of a new speculative fiction reading series. Funded by the Ontario Arts Council, ephemera will feature literary speculative fiction with a focus on emerging and underrepresented voices. Starting in November, it will run the first Wednesday of every month at the Glad Day Bookshop, Toronto.  Follow ephemera on Twitter and Instagram @ephemeraseries.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce that Aqueduct Press has just released her 140-page novella, The Rampant, as a paperback and ebook:

Christianity it turns out got a whole lot of things wrong. It’s ten years since the hordes of old-world Sumerian gods arrived in Southern Indiana ready to kick off the end of the world. Massive tornadoes, tsunamis, government collapse: it all started out so strong, but the Rampant, the final herald of the apocalypse, failed to show. Both people and gods have had to adjust. Sixteen-year-old Emelia Bareilles and Gillian Halkey have spent most of their childhood stuck in this seemingly never-ending apocalypse. Now the two friends are resolute: they will travel into the lands of the dead and force a change.

Paperback:  Amazon | Publisher

eBook:  Amazon | Publisher

Goodreads list.

What others are saying

“Equal parts playful and heartbreaking, this apocalyptic novella offers one-of-a-kind answers about the end of the world….This clever and surprisingly fun take on the rapture is the perfect theological horror story.” ~Publishers Weekly

“Day perfectly balances dark and light in The Rampant, and offers up a fresh take on apocalyptic fiction that draws on ancient mythology and literature to create something that feels completely original and new.” ~The Book Smugglers Women to Read

Josh Gauthier’s (Popular Fiction, S’17) debut full-length play Of Murder and Madness opens in early October at Footlights Theatre in Falmouth, Maine. The show runs from October 10-26, and tickets are on sale now. Visit the Footlights Theatre website for full details.

Nancy Hayden (Fiction S’12) and her husband John Hayden are excited about the September release of their new book, Farming on the Wild Side: The Evolution of a Regenerative Organic Farm and Nursery from Chelsea Green Publishing. The book explores growing fruit and perennial vegetables, enhancing native biodiversity for pollinators, beneficial insects, and birds, and increasing resilience in the face of climate change. Its hopeful message is combined with the authors’ color photographs of their Vermont farm.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has been elected president of Ozarks Writers League, which is headquartered in Branson, Missouri, but includes Arkansas as well. She will preside over a spring and a fall conference with national speakers.

Alan King‘s (Poetry, W’13) Drift, the audiobook, is now available on Audible. Learn more here.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) co-wrote a game called The Outer Worlds, which launches October 25th on PC and consoles. The Outer Worlds is a dark sci-fi satire about consumerism and corporate greed in space, full of fun shooty combat and opportunities for creative roleplay. You can find the latest trailer here (and below).

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) is delighted to reveal the cover of her fourth novel, Her Sister’s Tattoo, coming in April from Red Hen Press. Angela Davis blurbed the book with this quote: “The elegant restraint of Ellen Meeropol’s prose and the painstaking precision of her vision offer us discerning glimpses over decades and generations into the complexities of political engagement—its big questions and especially its intimacies. At a time when radical movements are on the rise, we find in Her Sister’s Tattoo exactly what we now need: both caution and hope.” Elli will be doing an ARC-drop road trip to New England indie bookstores this fall, so if you have suggestions about bookstores likely to be interested in a political novel, please let her know.

Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be at the Lewiston Public Library October 5th from 3:00-4:30 p.m. to discuss Memoirs and Loss with Suzanne Farrell Smith. Murray will be back at the Lewiston Public Library on October 26th teaching a Memoir Workshop from 1:30 to 3:30 in the afternoon. Both events are free and open to the public.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) story “Beth Garland Realizes Her Date is a Serial Killer” will be featured online in Parhelion Literary Magazine this October. John read this same piece at a Stonecoast Faculty & Guest event during his summer Teaching Apprenticeship.

Carolyn O’Doherty (Popular Fiction, W’11) is delighted to announce that her debut novel, Rewind, won the 2018 Oregon Spirit Book Award from the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. The award is given annually to the author of a distinguished contribution to young adult literature that engages and encourages readers’ imagination, discovery, and understanding, reflecting the spirit and values held by Oregonians. Carolyn’s second novel, Unleashed, the sequel to Rewind, was released in September 2019.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry W’17) will be the featured poet at Amesbury (Massachusetts) Public Library’s Fall Poetry Series on Tuesday, October 22nd, at 6:00 p.m.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has contracted her latest novel, Cow Palace, with B Ink Publishing; the book will be published in 2021. She will be reading from her most recently published book, Tapiser, at the Boothbay Public Library on Saturday, October 12th, at 2:00 p.m.; she will also be the guest at Union’s Vose Library for their annual “Soup & Suspense” fundraiser on Thursday, October 17th, at 6:30 p.m.

“On the Ridge,” a poem about the search for a man lost in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the forthcoming issue of The American Journal of Poetry.

An essay, “Upstairs Love,” by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) appears in the fall issue of Ovunque Siamo: New Italian-American Writing. Upcoming: Lisa and fellow Stonecoaster Anthony D’Aries will read together at I AM Books in Boston (November 9th); she will present two sessions at the Philadelphia Writing Workshop (November 23rd); and lead a three-day memoir workshop (January 17-20) at the Winter Poetry & Prose Getaway in Atlantic City, NJ, presented by Murphy Writing/Stockton University.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has an essay on the importance of Maine, and wonder, to Rachel Carson, in Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine,  and another about the monuments of oyster shells made by Wabanaki ancestors, in Island Journal. She wrote the cover story on Atlantic salmon for Maine Audubon’s Habitat magazine Summer Issue,  and she will be talking about salmon and signing copies of The President’s Salmon at Maine Audubon on October 3rd. Schmitt will be moderating a Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance discussion on “Finding a Publisher” at the Bangor Public Library on October 19th.

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Community News & Updates September 2019

FACULTY

The podcast of Tom Coash’s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) play Raghead has been added to the American Playbook Series. Raghead will also be produced in September at the Short & Sweet Festival in Auckland, New Zealand, and the Write About Now Festival in London, UK.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about the intersection of race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece was an August feature story for ESPN’s The UndefeatedToni Harris Made History by Getting a Football Scholarship. Now She Needs to Make Tackles. His YA book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight Between Hitler and America, was released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in June 2019.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) will be reading from his novel Nirvana Is Here at KGB on 85 E. 4th St. in New York on Sunday, September 8 at 7:00 p.m. He’ll also be signing books at the Brooklyn Book Festival, Sunday September 22 at his publisher’s booth in the afternoon. Also, a new mini-documentary (two and a half minutes) about Aaron and the novel directed by Ender Emre is now available online here. Check out Aaron’s Nirvana events in October (including appearances at Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, The Fall for the Book festival at George Mason University, the Detroit Public Library, and the National Press Club…) here.

Four-Sided, the short film based on Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel, is now an Official Selection at two more festivals this fall: Chi-Town Multicultural Film Festival in Chicago and Reel Q: Pittsburgh LGBTQ+ Film Festival! First, the film will have its USA debut at Massachusetts Independent Film Festival. For updates see www.afoursidedbedfilm.com

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) received the New England Director’s Award from the academy accredited Flickers’ Rhode Island International Film Festival for her film short The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. She is director and screenwriter for the film, which she adapted from her CNF memoir of the same title (Algonquin Books). The film is also a double finalist for the international Jackson Wild Media Awards in the categories of Audioscape and Education. A slate of 20 festivals spring through fall included summer premiers in Italy, Australia, and Poland, with many upcoming fall screenings including premiers in Canada and Germany. For more information please see wildsnailfilm.org

Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) debut novel Pivot, the first of the Jack Harper trilogy, received a rave review in Publishers Weekly: “Barlow’s gorgeous writing will easily propel readers through the rest of the series.” You can read the entire review here.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) appeared at Worldcon 77 in Dublin, where he presented a paper, “Mischief in Her Heart: Women’s Empowerment in the Persian Fantastic,” and appeared on the panels “Muslim SFF” and “Using Science in Fantasy Writing.” In addition, Peter narrated Premee Mohamed’s story “Willing” for the August 20 episode of PodCastle. You can listen to it here.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) placed her poem “The Perils of Invisibility” in Nonbinary Review #21 The Works of H .G. Wells (Zoetic Press, June 2019). In other news, her short story “The Gravity of Grace” was a finalist in the first quarter of Writers of the Future, May 2019. This story was one of the first pieces she workshopped at Stonecoast.

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’14) is excited to announce that her debut book, The Bone Cutters, is set for publication on Sunday, September 1st through Eraserhead Press. It’s a bizarro horror novella set in a dysfunctional psychiatric hospital, where you’ll meet a troubled young woman named Dory who encounters a peculiar and brutal group of patients when she’s sent to the wrong counseling group over and over again. Dory’s introduction to this counseling group sets her on the run in an attempt to save her life from The Bone Cutters. Renee’s book is available on Amazon, Indie Bound, Barnes & Noble, and at Longfellow Books. More stores to come soon. Two reviews for The Bone Cutters are already out, with more to come—one will soon be on the Cemetery Dance Reviews Blog. Here is what reviewers have to say about The Bone Cutters:

  • “It’s actually refreshing to be able to enjoy a book so much that you were miffed when it was over. As [her] debut novella, it’s a fantastic beginning to what could prove to be a career to watch. I’m giving this a solid 4 out of 5 [stars]…Considering that I’ve never read anything which rated a 5, I think The Bone Cutters is doing just fine.” ~Ginger Nuts of Horror
  • “I immediately fell in love with Dory, the writing style, the story…This is a terribly heart-wrenching story with a bit of a haunted house/ghost vibe where you’re also being chased by a bunch of crazy people who want to devour your bones. I didn’t want to put this book down.” ~Kendall Reviews

Renee is also thrilled to announce that Longfellow Books in Portland, Maine is hosting her book launch event on Thursday, September 5th, at 7:00 p.m. In addition to Renee’s reading and Q&A, there will also be live music to set the mood, performed by local guitarist Shaun Church Reehl. Elizabeth Searle will also be there as Renee’s MC.

September 12-14, Josh Gauthier‘s (Popular Fiction, S’17) 10-minute play “Expedition 3487-B” will be featured as part of the King of Crows play festival held at the St. Lawrence Arts Center in Portland, Maine. The festival is produced by the Crowbait Club, and you can find them on Facebook for more information.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has an essay, “Nice People,” in the summer issue of eMerge magazine.

Kristin Leonard (Fiction, S’18) has been selected to receive the Phi Kappa Phi Love of Learning Award to present at the 2019 Historic Writers of America Conference in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. She will be presenting a revised version of her third-semester presentation, “Discovery Through Multigenre Writing: How to Use Poetry and Playwriting to Develop Characterization, Conflict, & Plot in Fiction.”

Gregory Martin’s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short story “Inside” was recently published in Dark Moon Digest #36.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) received news from the editors of Narrative Magazine that her personal essay “Plume: An Investigation” was selected as a finalist in this year’s Spring Story Contest. She is currently working on a new collection that explores the complexities and ambiguities of family.

Renée Olander (Poetry, W’05) will read from her new collection, American Dangerous, at the Old Dominion University 42nd Annual Literary Festival in Norfolk, Virginia, Thursday October 10, 4:00 p.m., free and open to the public.  The entire festival schedule is available here.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgments” is forthcoming in Main Street Rag’s anthology Show us Your Papers, “The First Cold Rain Since Spring” will appear in the next Connecticut River Review, and “Lunar Eclipse” will be included in the special “Cosmos” edition of The Poeming Pigeon.

“Visionquest,” a prose poem by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the fall issue of Cimarron Review.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction S’08) recently judged the nonfiction entries for Tiferet Journal’s annual writing contest and her flash piece “A Grave Duty,” was published in the August issue of Flash Glass, part of Glassworks Magazine. She will be a keynote speaker at NJ Women Who Write’s one-day conference in Madison, NJ, on September 21, and on November 23, Lisa will speak on “Revising the Memoir Manuscript” at the Philadelphia Writing Workshop. A fun piece, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood,” is out in Chicken Soup: Angels All Around. Lisa’s editing role for Cleaver Magazine has expanded; she’s now handling craft essays on both fiction and nonfiction for their “Writer to Writer” column (pitch/submit here). In late August at the HippoCamp Conference for Creative Nonfiction, Lisa presented “Become a Writer who Reads Like a Writer” and was on a parenting/writing panel; earlier in the month, she led a week-long memoir workshop in New Hampshire for Murphy Writing.

Morgan Talty (Fiction, W’19) was included in Narrative Magazine‘s 30 Below 30 list for 2019. His short story “The Name Means Thunder” will appear in the Fall 2019 issue of The Georgia Review. 

 

 

 

 

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