Tag Archives: Jenny O’Connell

Community News & Updates August 2018

ALUMS

Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) is pleased to announce that her short story “The Painted Ponies of Wiley Creek” was featured by Not a Pipe Publishing for their Year of Publishing Women’s Short Stories series. Ted Deppe and others at the January ’18 Ireland Residency might recognize it—thanks for all your suggestions and encouragement!

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be presenting his award-winning essay “The Vault of Heaven: Science Fictions’s Perso-Arabic Origins” at Worldcon 76 in San Jose as part of an academic panel titled “Lowriders and Flying Horses: Expanding SF’s Definitions.” The panel will take place on Friday, August 17th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 211D of the San Jose Convention Center.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) placed her poem “Blood Works” in the HWA Poetry Showcase: Vol. 5. She also sold her story “Tyger, Burning Bright” for inclusion in the anthology Gorgon: Stories of Emergence, which is scheduled for publication by Pantheon Magazine this fall. “Blood Works” was written under the mentorship of Cate Marvin, and “Tyger, Burning Bright” was originally written under the mentorship of Liz Hand and was later workshopped under the direction of Cara Hoffman. Carina wants to thank all of the Stonecoasters who helped her shape these pieces for publication.

Melody Fuller (Creative Nonfiction, S’12), President and Founder of The Oakland Wine Festival, published two articles in The SOMM Journal recently: “A Call to Action” (page 80; April/May 2018) looks at the state of diversity in the multi-billion dollar wine industry and sparked an ongoing narrative about race and wine and “Fine-Wining While Black” (page 26; June/July 2018) provides an inspirational personal narrative.

Alan King‘s (Poetry, W’13) Point Blank was among the seven books briefly reviewed and recommended by The Best American Poetry blog. Here’s an excerpt: “[In] Alan King’s second collection of poetry, Point Blank…each poem [is] charged with an undeniable exuberance, willing to hold forth on the unvarnished injustice so visible in the American grain, and to compose a music from this framework as mellifluous as any Luther Vandross track and as rough and ready as Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx.” Read the full review.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) was one of the writers on Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire‘s first DLC, the Beast of Winter, which launches on August 2nd. This adventure takes the player to a frozen island populated by a doomsday cult, an ancient dragon, and gods only know what else.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two essays published in online journals last month: “The Sparrow’s Song” was featured on The Sunlight Press, and “The World in their Hands,” which appeared last year in The Maine Review, was reprinted at Nature Writing.

Roxanne Ocasio’s (Popular Fiction, W’15) short story “The Chupacabra Next Door” will be published in an upcoming anthology called The Latinx Archive: Speculative Fiction for Dreamers. She first workshopped this story at the Voice of Our Nation Arts Foundation Workshop for writers of color in 2014. Roxanne credits Stonecoast for introducing her to Marjorie Liu, who mentored her during her second semester and encouraged her to write characters of color.

Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) is thrilled to come full-circle as a Stonecoaster with her essay about art modeling, “Still Life,” in Issue No. 9 of the Stonecoast Review. She has a forthcoming piece about her walking journey across Finland in the upcoming “Flight” issue of Slice, as well as a craft article on vulnerability—based on her third semester project at Stonecoast—appearing in the fall “Risk” issue of Creative Nonfiction.

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) has joyfully accepted a visiting assistant professorship at Ryerson University’s School of Image Arts with the Faculty of Communication and Design, where she will preside over script development and film productions in the undergraduate film program, and teach screenwriting, directing, and creative leadership. Additionally, her short script Skin Deep has been adapted into a film.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) chapbook, Shades and Forms, has been accepted for fall publication by Clare Songbirds Publishing, and his short story collection The Trash Detail will also come out this fall from New Rivers Press.

Shannon Ratliff‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) essay “Perennial” appears in the Summer ’18 issue of Pleiadescurrently available here.

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W ’18) is the proud co-editor (alongside World Fantasy Award winner Sheree Renée Thomas and poet & artist Rasha Abdulhadi) of a special issue of Strange Horizons featuring stories, poems, and non-fiction from writers of color from the Southeastern USA. You can read Erin’s editorial and an introduction to the six amazing stories in the issue here.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) had a short story, “Tide Child,” recently published by On Spec. It’s about the relationships between fathers and sons, and the day you realize your dad has a story of his own. Also, Selkies. It’s currently only available in print, and can be found here.  This also marks his first international publication. He also just returned from a month-long course in Ireland at NUI-Galway looking at Education in Ireland. If you’re a teacher, or interested in education, check it out here.

Lisa Romeo by David Wilson for The Boston Globe

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), and her new memoir, Starting with Goodbye, were featured in the “Story Behind the Book Column” in The Boston Globe in early July, just ahead of appearances at several bookstores in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Lisa was also featured on an episode of the podcast The Ish (Grieving-Ish, part 2). In early August, she will present a session on getting published and will read during Western Connecticut State University’s MFA residency.

Nikki Sambitsky (Creative Nonfiction, W’18) will be teaching a one-day workshop on grief and hybrid, experimental, and lyric essays this fall (Saturday, December 1st from 1:00-5:00 p.m.) at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop! Check out the link to sign up and RSVP your spot! Another head’s up: Nikki is also teaching an Open Community Writing Session on November 16th from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Pioneer Valley Writers’ Workshop. The session is free and open to the public! Come, sit, write, commune with fellow writers!

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) was interviewed on her local NPR station, KERA, about Spiderweb Salon, an arts collective in Denton, Texas, that she’s involved with. Her Nebula-nominated novelette “The Orangery” appears in the Nebula Awards Showcase 2018 anthology. Paula Guran chose her Nightmare story “Secret Keeper” for Guran’s Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2018.

Lisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry ’04) new short story collection, Impossibly Small Spaces was published by Arlen House/Syracuse University Press on July 27th in Ireland. Stonecoasters attending the launch at Merriman’s in Kinvara/County Galway included Ted and Annie Deppe and Teresa Scollon. It will come out in the US in early October (though you can obtain an early copy from Lisa). The price is $20 with $2.00 of each sale going to the ACLU. lisactaylor22@gmail.com

Adrienne S. Wallner’s (Poetry, W ’09) poem “Ticket Stub” will appear in the Fall 2018 issue of Stoneboat Literary Journal.

FACULTY

JJ Amaworo Wilson (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) launched his 2016 novel Damnificados in Caxias do Sul, Brazil, in July 2018 and had smaller events in Sao Paulo, Brasilia, Belo Horizonte, and Natal. The novel, based on a true story that took place in Caracas, Venezuela, has a distinctly Latin American flavor. Damnificados won three awards and will be translated into German and French in 2019.

JJ Amaworo Wilson Damnificados Brazil July 2018

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) writes about race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, When Joe Louis fought Schmeling, White America Enthusiastically Rooted for a Black Man, was a June feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His upcoming YA book, War in the Ring, is also about the historic Louis-Schmeling fight; it will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in Spring 2019.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Non fiction) short story “Refugees,” which he read from at the last residency, is out in the newest issue of Bennington Review.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a special guest at San Diego Comic-Con, where she received the prestigious Inkpot Award for her fiction. In early August, she’ll be teaching a workshop for young writers at the Fine Arts Workshop in Provincetown.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) novella “The Wreck of the Godspeed” has been reprinted in The Final Frontier, edited by Neil Clarke from Night Shade Books. He has sold reprint rights to the original story “Yukui” from his new collection The Promise Of Space to Clarkesworld; it will appear later this year. He contributed an essay on the importance of short stories in science fiction to the blog Whatever.  Jim moderated a reading of Stonecoast alums at the Readercon science fiction and fantasy convention in Quincy on July 14.

Stonecoast alum reading at Readercon 2018

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) short fictions “This New Quiet” and “Dylan’s Lost Years” were included in New Micro: Exceptionally Short Fiction, co-edited by James Thomas and Robert Scotellaro and published by WW Norton, available in August 2018. Her poem “Even on a Sunday Drive” was a finalist in the 2017 Steve Kowit Poetry Prize and was published in the San Diego Poetry Anthology in March 2018. Also, Debra’s video poetry performance, “Small Buried Things: A Poet’s Response to Extraction,” was part of the Bedrock Lecture Series, organized by Oregon State University. The eighteen-part video lecture series was submitted as evidence to the Permanent Peoples’ Tribunal on Human Rights, Fracking, and Climate Change, an international tribunal that, in May of 2018, deliberated the global effects of fracking on human rights, the environment, and climate change.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Tamra Wilson’s (Fiction, S’11) anthology Idol Talk has received new media coverage and has multiple readings, including some newly added, in August:

  • Readings with Elizabeth Searle: August 8th at KGB in New York City at 7:00 p.m., including SCers Breena Clarke (Fiction) and new alum Lee J. Kahrs; (http://kgbbar.com/calendar/events/kgb_nyc_area_readers_from_idol_talk/) and August 30th at Harvard General Store 6:00-8:00 p.m. in Harvard, MA (including alum Michelle Soucy (Fiction, S’10, who created the fab. flyer).
  • On August 25th, Lee J Kahrs and Kate Kastelein will read from Idol Talk at 2:00 p.m. at Toadstool Books in Keene, NH.
  • More New England readings coming in September.
  • Readings and Talks in North Carolina with SC alum and Idol Talk co-editor Tamra Wilson: August 12th, Maine St Books in Davidson NC; August 13th Gaston County Library in Gastonia, NC; and August 21st at Morrison Branch Library in Charlotte, NC

Recent media includes Breena Clarke featuring Idol Talk on her blog,  Tammy’s radio interview in Hickory, NC, and the Boston Book Launch coverage on MetroWest Daily. Check the Idol Talk Facebook page for updates.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

YAAK VALLEY FOREST COUNCIL JOB OPENING: COMMUNITY OUTREACH/CONSERVATION ORGANIZER
Rick Bass
(Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change Faculty) and the Yaak Valley Forest Council are looking for a community outreach/conservation organizer to hire for a permanent position in northwest Montana’s Yaak Valley. Pay starts at $35-40K, depending on experience, and has growth potential. Insurance and vacation included, and the new hire will be able to work from home (in the community). Artistic inspiration in northwest Montana an added perk! (How is perk spelled? From what Latin root does it derive?) Sweet country and a valiant non-profit working for ecological and social justice.

BOSTON POETRY MARATHON SET FOR AUGUST 10-12 IN CAMBRIDGE
Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09), along with poets Suzanne Mercury, Darren Black, and Gillian Devereux, are this year’s Boston Poetry Marathon festival organizers. They are all published poets and veteran Marathon readers from the area. The poetry festival is entirely volunteer run. The Boston Poetry Marathon will be held August 10th – 12th, at Outpost 186 in Cambridge’s Inman Square. Throughout three days, over 100 local and out-of-town poets will read and perform their poems. Several Stonecoast Community members will be reading in this year’s marathon. The Marathon presents a diverse range of poetry styles; academics, slam poets, students from local creative writing programs, and everyone in between rub elbows during approximately 20 hours of poetry programming. Each poet is given a brief time slot to share their work with the audience. Attendance is free (donations accepted), and all ages are welcome.

“The Boston Poetry Marathon is a joyful, hopeful, and strengthening event, something vital during these dire times. We have poets, the poetry community, and poems to keep us going,” said co-organizer Bridget Eileen. “ Whether we go to poetry for escape, solace, empathy, or illumination, it fortifies us. When so many people come together to celebrate poetry, that certainly fortifies us. Bringing this event to so many people who treasure it is, of course, a lot of work–but it’s also energizing. All that creativity coming together in one place is really powerful. ”

“With so much political and social uncertainty right now, we feel it’s urgent to create a welcoming space for poets to share their poems and talk with one another,” said co-organizer Suzanne Mercury. “Poetry is a life-giving force, a deep and vital source of creative empathy. The world needs much more of it, especially now. The Boston Poetry Marathon offers more poetry—a lot more! Every year I come away exhausted, inspired, and ready to write.”

Gillian Devereux outlined the festival’s goals for maintaining inclusiveness. “We’re committed to finding new voices who may not have read here in the past to add to our roster. We want to hear from poets who represent the many diverse, vibrant poetic communities in the Greater Boston area.”

“The Marathon has a great base of dedicated followers—poets who share their work year after year,” said Darren Black. “It’s encouraging to see the developmental arcs of talented writers in our city. Whether you’re an established poet who has published many books, or you have never read your work in front of people before, the audience is so supportive. You never know what you’re going to hear. Every year is fresh, and a little unpredictable. But the basic formula is simple: We listen to a bunch of poems. We hang out. We have fun. We hope you’ll join us!”

For media inquiries, please contact the organizers at: bostonpoetrymarathon2018@gmail.com.

Event Details

What:  Boston Poetry Marathon
Where: Outpost 186 – 186 ½ Hampshire Street, Cambridge MA
When:  Friday, August 10th: 6:00-10:30 p.m.; Saturday, August 11th: 12:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m.; Sunday, August 12th: 11:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Online at

bostonpoetrymarathon.wordpress.com
https://www.facebook.com/groups/bonstonpoetrymarathon/
http://instagram.com/bostonpoetrymarathon

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2018

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Thank you to all who supported the One Month, One Voice campaign to benefit Stonecoast’s new Writing for Social Justice Scholarship. Together, we raised over $20,000! If you missed the campaign but would still like to be part of the movement, you can email stonecoastcommunity@maine.edu for information on donating or hosting an event. Thank you for being part of Stonecoast’s commitment to social justice.

Acclaimed Irish Fiction Writer Claire Keegan will be presenting a four-day Fiction Workshop in Winter Harbor, Maine, September 13-16, 2018!  Please contact Kathryn Balteff (current Fiction student) at info@FeatheredInk.org or Kathryn.balteff@maine.edu for details and registration information. Registration must be completed by June 1st. There are a limited number of spots available for this wonderful opportunity—don’t wait!

ALUM NEWS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) natural history memoir, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating (Algonquin Books, 2010), has been adapted for stage in Switzerland. Produced by the theater company FRADS Fruhstuck auf der Szene Buchholzstrasse, the performance involves one actor and one dancer. A video trailer for the production can be viewed here. Performances dates are April 25th, 27th, and 28th at the Theater Tuchlaube in Aarau, Switzerland, and May 26th at the Kelelrteater in Bremgarten, Switzerland. More information is available here.

Set photo: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) published his short story “The Witnesses” in the spring 2018 issue of The Superstition Review. His short story “The Dream” has been accepted for an upcoming issue of EPOCH magazine.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) has accepted a position as the audio producer for PodCastle, a weekly podcast that publishes fantastical short fiction.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is chuffed her 200-word flash “Cadaver Feet” will be reprinted in The Binge Watching Cure II: Horror anthology. This short was written for alumna Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art & Words show and art created for it can be viewed here. Karen is super excited that she will be participating in this year’s Art & Words show and artwork will be created for her Rhysling award-nominated poem “Syncing Minefields.” She’s honored her novel Swift For The Sun won a silver medal in the LGBT category of the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Award. Her article about what to consider while selling your fiction to podcast markets, “One Story, Told Well,” is available for reading on Writespace. Karen will be presenting on panels at Writespace Houston, May 4-5: “The Good, the Bad, and the Slushy: How to Save Your Story from the Slush Pile Neverland,” “Submission Tools for New Writers,” “The Future of LGBTQ Publishing: New Stories, New Voices,” and “Metal and Speculative Fiction.” At the end of the month, May 25-27, Karen will be presenting on two panels at Comicpalooza Houston—“Speculative Poetry Deathmatch” and “Finding Writing Inspiration”—as well as participating in “Poetry of the Imagination: A Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Reading” at Kaboom Books. She was interviewed on KHOI radio’s community bookshelf (April 17) about her work and the effects of divorce and dating on her writing. Her short story about divorce, “From Now Until Infinity” published in Factor Four Magazine, has been receiving a lot of buzz and was reviewed by Maria Haskins in “10 extra excellent stories I read in March.” Karen can be heard narrating work by Llewellyn, Schow, Cushing, Barker, and Gifune on Cemetery Pod. Stonecoast continues to be the single most influential experience on Karen’s career and she is grateful for it every day!

On May 13 the collaborative sound art project Soundtrack becomes available for download. This is a work presented by the Queens Museum as part of the Mel Chin: All Over the Place exhibit with project curator Jace Clayton (aka DJ /rupture), which will include Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11 ) reading from her novel Elysium.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has a play premiering soon! A Canticle of Light will run May 30th-June 2nd in Toronto, produced by indie theatre company Missed Metaphor Productions.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) now has her first-ever writer’s website lindabuckmaster.com. It includes her live blog “Field Notes,” her current “Audio Essays,” and all kinds of other great stuff. She’s also nailed the date for the launch of her hybrid memoir, Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, for November 4 at Waterfall Arts in Belfast, Maine. If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has written about the intersection of race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, “When Martin Luther King Died, Major League Baseball Struck Out,” was an April feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His YA book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight Between Hitler and America, will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in Spring 2019.

Hank Garfield‘s (Fiction, S’04) short-short story “The Pickup Artist” appears in the May issue of Portland Magazine. Hank also has a nonfiction piece, “An Old Boat Gets a New Waterline,” in the May issue of Points East, a boating magazine covering the entire New England coast.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) was the featured guest on WPFW 89.3 FM’s On The Margin with E. Ethelbert Miller. He discussed his latest book, Point Blank, talked fatherhood, and more. Listen to the recording here.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11)—Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire will be released on May 8th for PC/Mac/Linux! The game is fully voiced and features the cast of Critical Role, a popular D&D podcast where talented gaming industry voice actors play a tabletop adventure together. All of the actors play prominent roles in Deadfire. Enjoy the trailer below for some of the action, and enjoy the writing on May 8th!

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) latest collection Acres of Perhaps, featuring his work from Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and Nightmare Magazine plus several new stories, is now available from Amazon or your favorite online independent bookseller. If you enjoy alternate history crime, cursed toys, sky-gazing psychopaths, or creepy 60s TV shows, it may be just what you need for your nightstand.

Jeanette Lynes’ (Poetry/Fiction, ‘05) second novel, The Small Things That End The World, will appear in May 2018, published by Coteau Books, Regina, Canada. Jeanette is currently a Visiting Fellow at the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH).

Both of Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short mysteries, “The New Score” (Fish Out of Water Anthology, Wildside Press 4/17) and “The Drive By” (Busted! Arresting Stories from the Beat Anthology, LevelBest Books 4/17), have been nominated for Derringer Awards by the members of the Short Mystery Fiction Society. Winners will be announced on May 15th. Her short horror story “Kamikaze Iguanas” will appear in the MWA anthology for middle-grade readers entitled Scream and Scream Again (HarperCollins, 2018), edited by R. L. Stine, which is now available for pre-order.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece “Chrysalis” is featured in Melanie Faith’s In a Flash! Writing & Publishing Dynamic Flash Prose, available now through Vine Leaves Press. Nelson’s work appears alongside other Stonecoast alumni in this collection.

“Unseen Canyon,” Jenny O’Connell‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) essay about rafting the Grand Canyon with blind students, will appear in the summer edition of Camas, released this month. A second essay based on Finding Petronella, Jenny’s book project tracing her solo trek across Finland in the footsteps of Lappish legend Petronella van der Moer, is forthcoming from Slice Magazine in September.

American Dangerous, Renée Olander‘s (Poetry, W’05) first full-length collection of poems, will be published by Backlash Press in September 2018. She also has poetry and prose forthcoming in the anthology Feminine Rising, edited by Andrea Fekete and Lara Lillibridge, due in early 2019.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) third poetry chapbook, Alley of Dreams, has been published by Clare Songbirds Publishing of Auburn, NY.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short film The Bakebook was selected by Female Eye Film Festival to screen in a curated exhibition at De Montfort University on April 13, 2018, in association with the Cinema and Television History (CATH) centre. Her short story “Forty Whacks” has also been published in Vague Visages.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) has two ekphrastic poems that recently appeared in The Ekphrastic Review (April 10, based on a painting by Oldilon Redon; April 17, based on a painting by George Bellows). His poem “Aubade” will appear in Tahoma Literary Review in August.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) proudly announces the May 1 publication of Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss (University of Nevada Press). She’d like to express her gratitude and appreciation to all of her Stonecoast faculty and mentors, workshop leaders, and fellow students/alumni for the help and support!

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Angry Kings” appeared in the recent issue of Beneath Ceaseless Skies. 

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) has an essay in About Place Journal: “A Humbling Place” appears in the new ‘Rewilding’ issue.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) is co-editing a teen-idols anthology with Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) to be released June 15th from McFarland Publishers. Idol Talk will include work by Ann Hood, B. A. Shapiro, Susan Straight, Jill McCorkle, Lesléa Newman, Stephanie Powell Watts, and a host of others. The collection showcases a variety of female authors who share—most for the very first time—their teenage crush and the impact the experience had on their lives. Idol Talk will be the first book of teen-idol essays ever written entirely by female writers. Its focus is a topic that’s rarely discussed and seldom studied: the coming-of-age bridge in which girls intensely project themselves into a world beyond themselves. Both co-editors will be at Stonecoast in July to share excerpts and discuss writing about pop culture along with Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction).

STUDENT NEWS

Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction) has been offered a three book deal by California Coldblood Books, an imprint of Rare Bird Books, for a trilogy she has been working on for the past five years. She is over the moon for this wonderful opportunity, and she is so happy to be part of the CCB family.

FACULTY NEWS

Tom Coash’s (Playwriting) short play Quit Stalling will be produced in May as part of the 1:One Festival in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Shortly thereafter, the short film The R Word (for which he wrote the screenplay) will premiere at the White River Indie Festival, June 3, in White River Junction, VT.

Ted Deppe (Poetry) and Annie Deppe will be reading at the Linen Hall Library in Belfast, Northern Ireland, at 1:00 p.m. on 18 May. Ted will give a poetry masterclass/workshop from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon before the reading. As of this writing, there are still a few spots left for the workshop.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) 2005 Nebula-winning novella, Burn, has just had its first ebook edition. Particle Books, a new electronic imprint from Tachyon Publications, launched Burn on April 24; it includes a new afterword by Jim. He talks about the writing of the book as well as his forthcoming short-story collection The Promise of Space in an interview with Paul Semel. In other reprint news, Jim is the only author from the U.S. included in the just-published anthology Future Fiction: New Dimensions in International Science Fiction, edited by Bill Campbell and Francesco Verso, from Rosarium Publishing. Also represented in the table of contents are India, Greece, Zimbabwe, China, Italy, the Canada, the U.K., Russia, Mexico, Nigeria, and Cuba. Jim’s novelette “Bernardo’s House” was first published in 2003.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates October 2017

READINGS

The Stonecoast MFA community will host a special fall reading event at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 18th, at Arts at the Armory in Somerville, MA. The featured readers will be:

  • Elizabeth Searle (Faculty, Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting), author of five books of fiction, most recently We Got Him, and the librettist of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, a show which has drawn national media
  • Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09), author of The Language of Men: A Memoir, which received the PEN/New England Discovery Prize and Foreword’s Memoir-of- the-Year Award
  • Kara Storti (Fiction, S’06), author of Tripping Back Blue.

Arts at the Armory is located at 191 Highland Avenue between Davis and Union Squares. There is plenty of parking. Following the reading will be a talk back with the audience and a reception. We look forward to seeing you there!

ALUMS

Michael Beeman (Fiction, ’09) published his short story “To Fall and Rise Again” in the fall issue of storySouth.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has a letter addressed to the late author Octavia E. Butler in Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia E. Butler, a collection of essays and letters co-edited by Alexandra Pierce & Mimi Mondal and published by Twelfth Planet Press. She also has a story in the anthology Welcome to Dystopia edited by Gorden Van Gelder that is now available for pre-order. And last—but most certainly not least—she will be reading from her new upcoming book at the KGB Fantastic Fiction with our own James Patrick Kelly on October 18th!

Lauren M. Davis (Poetry, S’15) has worked as an adjunct professor at numerous colleges and universities since graduation. For Fall 2017, she designed, wrote, and is teaching Indiana Institute of Technology’s first creative writing course to ever be offered by the institution. She is the Keynote Speaker at the Poetry Society of Indiana’s annual writer’s conference, which will occur in October 2017. She was the writer-in-residence in Hypatia in the Woods’ Holly House in summer 2016. Her poems have appeared in several literary journals. This year, four of her poems were featured in 2River, Matador Review, and Hoosier Lit. She was just nominated for Best of the Net literary anthology by Matador Review for her poem “Martin’s Guilt”.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) is pleased to announce that her book-length braided essay Glass Needles & Goose Quills: Elementary Lessons in Atomic Properties, Nuclear Families, and Radical Poetics is now available.

Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) is thrilled (albeit EXHAUSTED) to report that, after two solid weeks of overnight shoots, production on the feature film he co-wrote, Beinghas wrapped. The movie, which features Lance Henriksen (Aliens, Near Dark, Millennium), Robert John Burke (Stephen King’s Thinner, Law & Order: SVU, Oz), Ahd (Collateral, Wadjda) and Ben Browder (Farscape, Stargate: SG1, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, Arrow, Doctor Who) now movies into post-production with an eye to widespread release in the spring of 2018.

Production stills from Being

Ellen Meeropol‘s (Fiction, W’06) third novel, Kinship of Clover, was selected as a Great Group Reads for 2017 by the Women’s National Book Association. Ellen is also pleased to announce that Straw Dog Writers Guild will present the Abel Meeropol Social Justice Writing Award to Stonecoast’s own Patricia Smith at a ceremony in Holyoke, MA, on November 12. Details at http://www.strawdogwriters.org/abel-meeropol-award.

From August through October 2017, Jenny O’Connell‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) short nonfiction poetry collection, “Home of Air,” was featured in Surface First Tilts West—an interactive outdoor art installation on Little Chebeague Island in Casco Bay, Maine. Curated by visual artist Jordan Kendall Parks, the exhibition was a multi-medium body of work that encouraged the audience to engage with each piece: crawling under a canvas and listening to a poem read aloud, sitting atop a bench with fabric inspired by traditional southern quilting that houses a poem regarding a relationship with “home,” listening to a recording along a trail, or climbing a giant oak tree and viewing a suspended reading.

Home of Air by Jenny O’Connell

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) has been selected for the Reykavik Talent Lab for rising filmmakers, which will take place at the Reykjavik International Film Festival in October 2017. During the lab, she will be pitching her thesis screenplay Mostly Harmless as a feature film concept to industry consultants and professionals.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poems, “Pandora at the Grocery Store,” “Rain Dimples the Pond,” and “A Grosbeak in the Simmer Dim,” will appear in Tipton Poetry Journal.

Shannon Ratliff‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) essay “The Named Women” appears in the Fall ’17/Winter ’18 issue of Slice Magazine, currently out.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is teaching a one-day intensive, “Where it Happens: Writing Place and Setting in Creative Nonfiction,” for the Cedar Ridge Writers Series, in Bedminster, NJ, on November 4. The Brevity Blog published Lisa’s piece, “Teaching: A Little Brevity By My Side,” as part of a series on Brevity in the writing classroom, to mark the journal’s 20th anniversary.  Lisa presented twice at the recent HippoCamp17: Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers. At the conference website, you can view the accompanying slide shows for the breakout session Submission Strategy – Beyond Wish Lists, Tiers, and Industry Buzz, and the “lightning round” talk, I’ll Take Titles for a Thousand, Alex.

R. M. Romero (Popular Fiction, S’15) is pleased to announce that her debut novel, The Dollmaker of Kraków, is now available from Penguin Random House’s Delacorte Press imprint. The novel was originally her MFA thesis.

A story, “Southern Gal,” by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) appears in the premiere issue of the journal Teach.Write.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Popular Fiction, Fiction) will be featured in an event hosted by George RR Martin at his Jean Cocteau Cinema in Santa Fe, NM, on October 8th. Several Wild Cards authors will discuss the series, answer questions from the audience, and then sign books. Other authors on hand include Melinda Snodgrass, Daniel Abraham, Marco Kloos, Mary Ann Mohanraj, Ian Tregillis, Carrie Vaughn, and more!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a participant at the 75th annual Worldcon in Helsinki, where she was interviewed for a feature on her feminist writings in Helsingin Sanomat, Finland’s largest newspaper. Her recent collection of essays and fiction, Fire, received excellent reviews in Rain Taxi (where Stonecoast got a shoutout) and Tor.com. She’ll be appearing in the D.C. area at the Fall for the Book Festival, as well as reading at The Potter’s House in D.C. She has a short story in the forthcoming anthology Mixed Up.  Recent book reviews include Robin Sloan’s Sourdough for The Washington Post.

PopFic faculty member Nancy Holder‘s new Buffy the Vampire Slayer Encyclopedia is on sale everywhere! Written with the original editor and creator of the Buffy publishing program at Simon and Schuster, the encyclopedia covers the Buffy and Angel TV series and the comics canon (including After the Fall, Angel and Faith, and Spike). Watch/listen to a review here. She was interviewed on September 29th by “Bonnets at Dawn” about her adaptation of Elizabeth Gaskell’s short story, “The Old Nurse’s Story,” to be published in the forthcoming comic book series Mary Shelley Presents. Copies of the limited edition of the comic will be on sale at Gaskell’s home in Manchester, England.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) has placed a new far-future novelette set on a starship called “Grace’s Family” with the online magazine Tor.com: it will be published sometime in 2018. His near future story about digital immortality “And No Torment Shall Touch Them” debuts October 15 in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. He has also adapted a lecture on H. G. Wells and time travel that he gave at the winter residency for his regular column in Asimov’s; it’s called “Remembering Bertie.” Jim continues to be interviewed as he promotes his new novel Mother Go. He is on the cover of the October issue of the print magazine Locus and talked about his career as a writer and teacher at Stonecoast for the podcast Eating the Fantastic.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will be Writer-in-Residence at Bay Path University October 15-21. On October 15th, at Bay Path Writer’s Day, Elizabeth will appear on a panel with star Stonecoast alum Ellen Meeropol; the panel, Swimming the Currents, will focus on using “current event” topics in fiction. On October 22nd, an excerpt from the opera Seven Rabbits on a Pole (libretto by Elizabeth and music by Pasquale Tassone) will be performed at the 15th annual fundraising concert Music to Cure MS from 3:00-5:00 p.m. at 50 Paul Revere Rd, Arlington, MA. On October 26th, Elizabeth will be a featured author, along with Andre Dubus III and Margot Livesey, at the Worcester Public Library annual fundraiser; copies of Elizabeth’s newest novel We Got Him will be gifts at the fundraising auction. For updates, please visit www.elizabethsearle.net.

Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek will read from their collection Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow, As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives on Saturday, October 7th, 1:00-2:00 p.m., at the Irish Cultural Center of Western New England, 429 Morgan Road, West Springfield, MA. Also reading will be soapy contributors Tommy Shea and, via Skype from Co. Galway, Ireland, Nuala Ni Chonchuir. The event is free and open to the public, and will be an opportunity to visit the newly renovated venue, which includes an Irish-themed pub and restaurant. Copies of Soap Opera Confidential, and other books by all four authors, will be available for sale before and after the presentation.

Suzanne will be one of the hosts for Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day on October 15th at the main campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. Join other aspiring and published writers for our 16th Writers’ Day featuring Patricia Reis, Charles Coe, Elizabeth Searle, Ellen Meeropol, and Meredith O’Brien. Registration and Check-in begins at noon, in D’Amour Hall for Business, Communications and Technology, and continues throughout the sessions:

Session One: “Mining the Personal for your Nonfiction” with Patricia Reis
1:00 – 2:15 p.m.
Author, visual artist, filmmaker and therapist Patricia Reis will discuss using personal experiences, memories, documents, letters, diaries and more as you craft nonfiction of any length. Topics will include using personal elements and materials in nonfiction rather than fiction, how resources can be gathered, what it’s like to present a relative’s story – and your own – so candidly, and dealing with family reactions while a project is in process and after it’s published. Patricia is the author of the award-winning memoir Motherlines: Love, Longing and Liberation, which weaves the story of Patricia’s coming of age as a woman, feminist and artist with that of a beloved aunt whose life as a nun included social justice work in 1970s Latin America.

Session Two: “Standing Your Ground: Thoughts on Reading in Public” with Charles Coe
2:35 – 3:50 p.m.
For writers who want to become more comfortable and effective reading their work in public, Charles Coe is the man to see. The award-winning poet and singer will describe tools and techniques that can help in preparing and delivering a reading. He’ll also work with a few volunteers willing to read before the group and be coached on their presentations. Don’t miss this great opportunity to read and up your reading game.

Session Three: “Swimming With the Current” with Ellen Meeropol, Elizabeth Searle and Meredith O’Brien G’17
4:10 – 5:25 p.m.
Join Massachusetts authors Ellen Meeropol (Stonecoast alum!), Elizabeth Searle (Stonecoast faculty!) and Meredith O’Brien as they discuss how current events in their hometowns and in the larger world have inspired their engrossing fiction and nonfiction. Incorporating topics including cults, racial diversity, the Boston Marathon bombings, human trafficking and a community in grief, the trio’s work will get you thinking about how to use current events as your own springboard. Bring writing materials for a brainstorming session.

Cost & Registration:

  • One workshop is $40
  • Two workshops, $75
  • Three workshops, $100

To register, please visit http://www.baypath.edu/events-calendar/community-events/writers-day/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates March 2017

2017 STONECOAST ALUMNI REUNION

The submission deadline for readers and presenters for the 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion has been extended to March 15th! Stonecoast celebrates our 15th anniversary this July residency with an alumni reunion July 14th-17th. Readers will be chosen by a small committee through a blind submission process, and will be featured in the residency-wide evening reading on Friday, 7/14. Panelists and seminar leaders will receive free registration to the reunion. To apply for either position, or to register for the reunion, visit http://usm.maine.edu/stonecoastmfa/stonecoast-alumni-0. Any questions can be directed to Jenny O’Connell, Stonecoast Community Outreach Coordinator: jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu. We hope to see you this summer!

ALUMS

9-tales-told-in-the-darkKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled to announce four flash fiction sales: 1000-word original featuring creepy prognosticating dolls called “Eyes That See Everything” in February’s Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s Artemis Rising 3: Return of Hecate; 800-word evil dollhouse reprint “What the Dollhouse Said” forthcoming in Red Lighthouse’s Mrs Rochester’s Attic anthology (Mantle Lane Press); 1200-word alien overlords reprint “Like a Soul,” which originally appeared in the Stonecoast Review’s first issue, will appear in July’s Darkhouse Books’Descansos anthology; and 1500-word tarot murders reprint “The Red Red Rose,” which appeared in Stonecoast Lines and was inspired by faculty Tony Barnstone’s “The Tarot of Creativity” session at the S’12 residency, will appear in Bride of Chaos’s 9 Tales Told in the Dark #21, March 9, 2017. Yay for short disturbing fiction about kids and bullies! Karen also sold an original whimsical poem about a flying girl titled “Essential Elements for a Tea Party” (inspired by alumna Bonnie Stufflebeam) forthcoming in Dreams and Nightmares Magazine #107 September 2017. And, last but not least, Karen’s first novel, an LGBT romantic pirate adventure set in 1822 Caribbean, Swift for the Sun, comes out March 27, 2017, via Dreamspinner Press and is now available for ebook and paperback preorder! Woo hoo!

nhrJulie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce she has just signed a contract with PS Publishing for her first short story collection, scheduled for release later this year. The collection, titled Uncommon Miracles, contains eighteen stories, many previously published in fantasy magazines, horror anthologies, or literary journals. Laura Page in The Review Review praised Julie’s work as “startling and elegant,” while Paul Michaels of This Is Horror described it as “[melding] magical realism and southern gothic…to beautiful and immersive effect.” Julie’s novelette “Idle Hands,” which is part of the collection, can also be found in the most recent issue of the New Haven Review. “Idle Hands,” among other things, is a generational story about mothers, daughters, the multiverse, and a family’s unusual addiction.

one-nation-under-baseballJohn Florio (Fiction, Pop Fiction, S’07) is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be released by University of Nebraska Press on April 1. The book covers the intersection of race, politics, social issues, and sports during the turbulent ’60s; Bob Costas wrote the foreword. You can read the Kirkus review here. John is also writing a young adult sports book for Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press.

Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) will be in Moscow until May 11 consulting with development executives and writing staffs on television series in production for Sony Television Russia. His half hour comedy pilot script for the Independent Film Channel, Get Your Shit Together, has been approved by development executives and is now under consideration for a production order. In prose-world terms, the publisher has bought the manuscript and is now deciding when and if to publish.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) alternate disco-and-crime history novelette “Night Fever” will appear in the May/June 2017 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction. It even has a playlist on Spotify (search for “Will Ludwigsen’s Night Fever”) for added atmosphere for the story.

Kelsey Olesen (Popular Fiction, W’017) will be presenting a paper at the International Conference for the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, FL, on March 23, 2017. Her paper, “A Feminist in Disguise: On Cinderella Past and Present,” will be presented as part of the Young Adult and Children’s Division of the conference. Arguing that popular retellings of this infamous fairy tale fail to bring the story into a modern feminist world, Kelsey’s paper will urge listeners to teach and write retellings that retain the original heart of the Cinderella fairy tale to create empowering literature for children and young adults. She is eager to attend ICFA with fellow Stonecoast Winter ’17 graduates Steve Cave and Alex Sherman, as well as her thesis mentors James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss. Kelsey wishes to thank Nancy Holder, her project mentor, for assisting in the conception and creation of the original paper that provided the research and discoveries for this presentation.

Kelsey at presenting on "Damsels Without Distress: Rewriting Fairy Tales for a Modern Audience" at the Stonecoast Winter 2017 residency

Kelsey at presenting on “Damsels Without Distress: Rewriting Fairy Tales for a Modern Audience” at the Stonecoast Winter 2017 residency

David Page, MD (Popular Fiction, W’06), has published a book with Praeger entitled The Laparoscopic Surgery Revolution: Finding a Capable Surgeon in a Rapidly Advancing Field.

a-symphony-of-cowbellsHeather Preusser‘s (Fiction, S’13) debut picture book, A Symphony of Cowbells, will be released March 15, 2017, from Sleeping Bear Press. The story, about a cow who loses her bell and disrupts the harmony of the herd, is illustrated by Eileen Ryan Ewen.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Orangery” is a 2016 Nebula Award finalist in the novelette category.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction) has accepted a position as Editorial Assistant at IDW Publishing, one of the top four comic book publishers in the U.S., renowned for its diverse catalog of licensed and independent titles.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has accepted a tenure-track position in the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno. He’ll be moving out there right after the summer residency. Yes, this will be the Durham’s third summer move in a row. When will it end? By the way, David has no plans to leave Stonecoast anytime soon! Thanks to Deb Marquart, he’ll be reading at Iowa State University on March 23rd (his birthday) along with author Benjamin Percy. They will, no doubt, talk about werewolves…

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) and Stacie Whitaker’s initiative to Bury the White House in Books received national and international media attention from The Huffington Post, CNN, and many others, and attracted 3000 followers on Facebook.

soap-opera-confidentialElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) anthology on soap operas is scheduled to be out this spring from McFarland Books: Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow, As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives. Elizabeth is reading from her novel We Got Him on March 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at the Out of the Blue gallery in Cambridge, MA, at the Dire Reading Series and on March 25 at the Falmouth Library on Cape Cod. Interviews about We Got Him are coming up: The Frankie Boyar Show (national radio show; 11:30 a.m. March 16th; live interview), Behind the Pages (Brookline Access TV; broadcast date TBD), Books & Authors (AT&T; broadcast date TBD), Cape Cod’s South Shore radio (April 12: 8:40 a.m.), and ET-WATD-FM “The South Shore’s Morning News” (taped interview). For updates:  www.elizabethsearle.net

Bay Path University’s 15th Writers’ Day, to be held April 2 at the campus in Longmeadow, MA, will feature Stonecoasters Melanie Brooks, who’ll be talking “Writing Hard Stories,” the topic of her highly acclaimed newly published first book, and Mary Heather Noble, who’ll be talking about sources of inspiration for her acclaimed essays on family, nature and current events. The lineup will include inspiration panelist John Sheirer and Dave Stern, and a primer on podcasting by Bernadette Duncan Harrison, a former national talk-show producer and author of Yappy Days, a newly-published memoir of her time in that arm of radio. Find Suzanne Strempek Shea, Bay Path’s writer in residence, at the registration table. She hopes to see you there, and sends this link with schedule and registration information. Suzanne also is looking forward to the week of April 2 as Melanie Brooks will be Bay Path’s visiting writer that week. Melanie’s duties will include giving a talk and reading on Thursday, April 6, at 6:30 p.m., at the university’s Hatch Library. The event is free of charge. Melanie’s Writing Hard Stories will be available for purchase at both Writers’ Day and Melanie’s reading.

 

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Community News & Updates May 2016

ALUMS

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has 7 pieces of exciting news this month.

  1. Her new short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” has been accepted into fellow alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art & Words Show—Karen is so very excited to participate in the show again!!!!
  2. Also, Karen’s haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Iron Soap’s 200 CCs on October 7, 2016.
  3. The sad puppies kerfuffle poem Karen mentioned last month, “Keep Hugo Stormed,” is now available for reading (scroll all the way to the bottom) at Eye to the Telescope Magazine. She is still nervous about potential reactions to the poem but as yet has received only positive feedback.
  4. Her epic science fiction novella “Failsafe” (18k word salute to Aliens) will be reprinted in a forthcoming science fiction anthology put out by Onyx Neon Shorts.
  5. A 1250-word “Like a Soul” flash, originally published in The Stonecoast Review, will be reprinted in Centum Press’s first anthology, One Hundred Voices.
  6. She’s going to be an author guest (with Stonecoaster Mur Lafferty) at the GenCon Writer’s Symposium this August, moderating/speaking on seven panels and one critique workshop.
  7. The DSP Publications editing team working on her 27,000-word pirate adventure novella “Swift for the Sun” (coming 1st quarter 2017) have crafted this very cool blurb:

Benjamin Swift imagines himself a smuggler, a gun runner, and an all-around scoundrel. A preacher’s son turned hard-bitten criminal. Sinner extraordinaire. But first and foremost, a survivor.

He’s never considered himself noble.

When Benjamin is shipwrecked on a tropical island, fortune sends an unlikely savior: a blond savage who is everything Benjamin didn’t know he needed. Falling in love with Sun is easy, but pirates have come looking for the remains of Benjamin’s cargo. They find their former slave, Sun, instead.

Held captive by the pirates, Benjamin learns the depths of Sun’s past and the horrors he has been exposed to and forced to perpetrate. Together, they must not only escape, but prevent a shipment of weapons from making its way to rebellious colonists. Benjamin is determined to save the man he loves and ensure their peaceful future together is never threatened again. To succeed might require the unthinkable—an altruistic sacrifice.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay appear in the fall issue of Jabberwock Review. Thanks to the mentors and members of Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s workshop who helped her work on this piece. This is Amy’s first published essay.

Paula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) third novel, The Drowning Girls, was published on April 26 by Mira. It was chosen by Target as an Emerging Authors pick and has received early critical acclaim, including a starred review in Library Journal. She was a recent guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss writing the book. Her first novel, The Mourning Hours (workshopped at Stonecoast and mentored by Suzanne Strempek Shea and Boman Desai), is being rereleased this summer in a mass market format. Paula is a lecturer in writing at the University of California, Merced, and will serve this summer as permanent faculty at Go Deep, a writing and yoga retreat in the Sierra Nevadas.  More information can be found on her website www.paulatreickdeboard.com

In April, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) was hired by Sony Television International as a consultant in Moscow on Russian adaptations of American television comedies. After a month on The Voronins, the Russian version of Everybody Loves Raymond, he has been assigned to run the writers’ room on Lucky Us, the Russian version of Roseanne. Mike will oversee the writing staff as it prepares outlines and scripts for episodes of the series.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold a new science fiction novel called The Fortress at the End of Time to Tor.com.

MagickByMoonriseFinalLaura Navarre‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) award-winning Tudor fallen angel romance Magick By Moonrise was picked up by Harlequin’s worldwide paranormal romance program as a direct-to-consumer release for August 2016, thereby proving again the wisdom of the writer’s adage: “Don’t follow the trends. Write what you love.” Laura’s amazed that it worked. 🙂

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short story, “Sola Fide,” will be featured in the summer issue of Able Muse Review.

Historic Acadia National ParkHistoric Acadia National Park: The Stories Behind One of America’s Great Treasures by Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has just been published by Lyons Press, part of a series of books in observance of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016. Schmitt will host a launch party at the Northeast Harbor Library on May 18.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Split,” a fantastical fictionalization of her move to Eugene, OR, in 2010, appeared in The Master’s Review. She has also announced the participants in the 2016 Art & Words Collaborative Show she curates annually, which started out as her Stonecoast Third Semester Project, and she was thrilled to see a plethora of Stonecoast alumni in her submissions queue. This year the show will feature alum Shawna Borman and Karen Bovenmyer. For a complete list of participants, click here.

From Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Thanks to the contributions of Stonecoast leaders and alumni, Artists Wielding Words and Images was a huge success. Robin Talbot‘s unassuming grace made it possible for 85 artists, students, and community members to gather and explore the power of art (broadly defined to include written word and visual image) to effect social change. Justin Tussing moderated a panel of writers and photographers who shared challenges of creating work that reflects social issues. Novelist Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, ‘06) discussed the personal journey that led to two novels with themes addressing the emotional impact of political activism. Alumna Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11) and student Jenny O’Connell (‘17) helped to create breakout sessions in which participants experienced ways in which their own creativity might influence social change. Adult artists and the King Fellows (high school students whose creative writing focuses on racism and social justice) facilitated the breakouts. Artists Wielding Words and Images will be the blueprint for ongoing community conversations about art as an agent of social change.

Jennifer Wade (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) is a reader for Creative Nonfiction magazine and its new enterprise, True Story magazine, which will debut this fall, featuring one long form CNF piece each issue.

Ashley Warren (Fiction, S’12) has four poems—“Modern Witchcraft: A Business Meeting,” “Ode to Procrastination,” “Spreadsheet,” and “Symptoms of a Brain Injury”—in an April 2016 issue of Easy Street.

STUDENTS

Mythic DeliriumCarina Bissett‘s (Popular Fiction) poem “Swimming with the Shark Boys” is featured online in the May selections of Mythic Delirium (Issue 2.4).

Ellie O’Leary’s (Poetry) poem “The Ghosts Rondeau in the Granite” will appear in issue 36 of The Northern New England Review. Her poem “The Woods Are Open to Me Now” (a rimas dissolutas) will be in the book The Crafty Poet II: A Portable Workshop by Diane Lockward.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel, The Risen, about the Spartacus rebellion against ancient Rome will be published on May 3rd, both as a hardback and as an audiobook.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching at the Peripatetic Writing Workshop this summer, in Woodstock, NY. It’s both a workshop and a writing retreat with lots of opportunities to get extensive feedback, especially for those working on longer projects. Check out their website for more info: http://www.peripateticwritingandart.org/home

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Hard Light has received rave reviews from Maureen Corrigan at The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and the Associated Press, among others. She was featured as part of the Rubin Museum’s Brainwaves Festival in NYC, where she appeared with neuroscientist Dr. Carl Bazil in a conversation about parasomnia, spoke with the A.V. Club’s Jason Heller about her five favorite books on music, and did a reading at the Mysterious Bookshop in NYC. Just announced: she’s co-editing the upcoming issue of the literary magazine Conjunctions with Bradford Morrow. Her essay on Hillary Chute’s Disaster Drawn: Visual Witness, Comics, and Documentary Form appeared in The Boston Review. Recent reviews include Lavie Tidhar’s A Man Lies Dreaming for The Washington Post.

StokerCon-logo-red-whiteNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will participate in StokerCon™, the annual horror conference presented by the Horror Writers Association, at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas from May 12-15. She will be riding the HWA Los Angles StokerBus, leaving the Iliad Bookstore in North Hollywood on Thursday around 10 AM. There are still seats available! Cost is currently $176 but will decrease with every new rider. Contact Nancy if you are interested. At StokerCon, she will participate in signings, readings, panel discussions, and teaching “How to Write Scary” at Horror University. Her panels include “Screenplay Writing for Authors” with 41dYNQfjMLL-1._SX302_BO1,204,203,200_Jack Ketchum and “The Romance of Horror” with Heather Graham. She will co-present the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel with Goosebumps author R.L. Stine. Also, Fire at Sea, Nancy’s third Beauty and the Beast novel, set in the universe of the CW TV show, will go on sale on May 31.

This month Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will make his acting debut as comedian Henny Youngman in his short play Henny and Hitler in Hell. The play is part of a collection of seven short plays in a show called Group Synergy. The Actors Studio of Newburyport. The Tannery, Mill #1, Suite 5, Newburyport, MA 01950.

"Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked."

“Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked.”

 

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Community News & Updates April 2016

Note from Jenny O’Connell, Community Outreach Coordinator for Stonecoast MFA

In 2017, Stonecoast MFA turns fifteen!  We would like to invite you to come celebrate with us at an alumni reunion weekend during one of the 2017 residencies. I’ll be working closely with Robin to make sure the alumni weekend is framed around YOU. Please take a moment to fill out the (very brief!) survey, which was posted to the the Alumni Listserv, by May 1, 2016.

Also, if you haven’t had a chance to “like” the newly re-vamped Stonecoast Facebook Page or follow us on Twitter, please take a moment to join our online community and stay connected.  Both are updated frequently with news on Stonecoast writers and the literary world.  If you have any news about your own writing that you’d like to see posted, send it along to jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu.

We are excited to hear from you!  Happy writing.

Note from Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Artists Wielding Words and Images is a collaborative project of Maine Media Workshops + College, USM’s Stonecoast MFA, and Your Write Mind that addresses the role of art as an agent of social change. This kickoff event begins with a panel of artists who will share the challenges they face when seeking to communicate social issues in a way that opens hearts and minds. Breakout sessions follow the panel to provide participants with an experience of exploring how their own creativity can influence social change.

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) finally has her new website up and humming; you can access it here. She’d love to have you visit, look around and leave a comment. And other news, Moon Dark, Book #1 of The Auriano Curse, her paranormal historical romance, is now available in paperback format.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to report that her novel Catwalk (Midnight Ink, 2014) has won the 2015 Maxwell Award for fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. Catwalk is the third book in Sheila’s Animals in Focus Mystery series. Book #1, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and The Money Bird was a finalist in 2014.

Corpse RoadsKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has a new poem “Effects of Moonlight” and a reprint prose poem “So Normal and Unwritten” coming out in Folk Horror Revival’s forthcoming Corpse Roads horror poetry anthology. She sold a new flash fiction story “On Rising One Snowy Evening” to Parsec Ink‘s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface anthology. She’s also excited to announce her story “The Scarlet Cloak” is being produced in audio for the Gallery of Curiosities podcast, which she will narrate herself. Date update: Her poem about the Sad Puppies Kerfuffle “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear on April 15, 2016, in Eye to the Telescope #20. She’s so grateful for all of you and your continued inspiration and encouragements!

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) will be on a panel discussion called “Alien(ation): Diversity Under Attack, Racism, Homophobia, & Sexism at Hugo Awards & Beyond,“along with scholar André Carrington and science fiction author Craig Laurance Gidney, on Friday, April 8th, at 6:00-8:00 pm, at the CUNY Graduate Center, room 9204, 365 Broadway at 34th Street, Manhattan, NYC. The event is free and open to the public.

Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) debut novel, The Big Rewind (William Morrow), received 3/4 stars from Charles Finch in USA Today. She was also a USA Today “Weekend Pick” on Saturday, March 12.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lesson plan called “Making a Poem Hum” from the anthology Poetry Crossing will be published in Teachers & Writers magazine‘s April issue.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has been writing for the newly announced fantasy role-playing game from Obsidian Entertainment, Tyranny: “In Tyranny, the grand war between good and evil is over—and the forces of evil, led by Kyros the Overlord, have won. The Overlord’s merciless armies dominate the face of the world, and its denizens must find their new roles within the war-torn realm.” For more information about the game, including screenshots and a trailer, visit the website.

Tyranny

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) has two poems in the spring 2016 issue of diode. Her first full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room, will soon be released by Terrapin Books.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was happy to have her short story “Boy Trouble” appear in Brain, Child this month. Thanks to the Stonecoast Ireland Crew (S’13) and Nancy Holder for the revision advice, especially moving the gun to the end of the story. She also had a humor piece called “Advice to Writers from 80s Hair Bands” published on Beyond Your Blog, a short essay called “The Chickens” on Mutha Magazine, and another short essay called “One Cake or Three?” on the Brain, Mother Blog.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W ’05)  and Nancy Holder (faculty) both saw stories published in the March 2016 issue of Nightmare magazine. Sandra’s story features Susie Lovecraft, mother of famed H.P. Lovecraft, in a creepy tale about female sexuality and the forces that bind it. She also has more fiction forthcoming this year in Nightmare, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and more. Visit her at www.sandramcdonald.com.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece, “Signs of Alcoholism,” will be featured in the inaugural issue of Indicia.

Renee Olander (Poetry, W’05) presented a paper, “Language and Power in the Age of Trigger Warnings and Title IX Redux,” at the 27th Annual Spring Conference on the Teaching of Writing at Old Dominion University (March 21, 2016); she will participate in the panel “Literary Foremothers and Filling the Gaps” at the AWP Annual Conference in Los Angeles on April 1, 2016.  She has both a flash fiction (“Dear Torso, Stone-carved”) and a poem (“The Apparatus of the Dark”) forthcoming in the 2017 anthology Memoirs of the Feminine Divine, edited by Andrea Fekete and Lara Lillibridge.

The Book of the MandolinAnne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, will be published by B Ink Books on April 1st. You can watch the book trailer here.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry ’12; also ex-faculty) is in the midst of a Canada-wide tour for Let the Empire Down, her second collection with Biblioasis. An interview with Alexandra recently appeared in The Windsor Star. Alexandra begins her PhD (English and Critical Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, ’12) has started a podcast about love on an island (because she lives on an island in Alaska!), along with three radio-minded friends. Listen to the first episode here.

Sean Robinson’s (Popular Fiction, W’14) story “He Who Makes the Slippers,” a fairy tale written his first day at Stonecoast, was published in Mirror Dance. Sean also presented a paper at ICFA (International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts), “Ossomancing the Siren,” which started as his third semester project and has grown since then. He is also in the middle of his second semester as a Teaching Lecturer at Plymouth State University where he’s teaching writing and fairy tales and having a blast.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was one of three finalists in the Rose Metal Press Chapbook Contest for her CNF manuscript, Tuck the Story Away (judged by Ira Sukrungruang​). A narrative essay, ​”Jersey Nights on Broadway,” is running on the NYC story site, Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood.

9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webBeyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be released on April 5! Anne K. Ross is the pen name of a 2007 Creative Nonfiction graduate. For more information, visit the website.

Kathleen Saville‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey will be published by Arcade Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, in January 2017. She’s very excited, as you can imagine. While at Stonecoast, she worked with Cait Johnson, Barbara Hurd, and Debra Marquart on parts of her book; their guidance inspired her as did the wonderful Stonecoast environment.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) just released her collaborative audio fiction-music album Strange Monsters, funded through Kickstarter. The album features six of her previously published short stories read by actors and threaded with original musical compositions. The album is currently available through CDBaby here.

Julie VanDeKreke‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) work will be featured in the Spring Equinox 2016 edition of Mused: The Bella Online Literary Review, with one nonfiction piece, one poem, and two photos.

Christopher Varlack (Creative Nonfiction/Poetry, S’10) successfully passed his dissertation defense at Morgan State University this March with his PhD in English to be conferred this May.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) published his critical essay “Self-Speaking World” on experiments in autobiography in the Spring issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies. This started as a third semester project with Debra Marquart and then became part of his final residency presentation.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has a story, “Deanie’s House,” in Waypoints, Issue 2.

FACULTY

51RmY3JvlzL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_Susan Conley’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) photo/story book collaboration Stop Here This Is The Place: A Year In Motherland will be published April 14th. The book traces the year in the life of each of the collaborators’ children on their street in Maine and celebrates motherhood and simply being a kid. Real Simple Magazine will do a feature on Stop Here in April as well as Donwneast Magazine, The Portland Press Herald, and other media outlets. The book launch party will take place on Thursday, May 5th, from 5:30-8:00 p.m. at the Portland Museum of Art, and all in the Stonecoast greater community are welcome. An additional reading will take place on May 19th at Longfellow Books in Portland.

Tantor Audio has acquired the audio rights to David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) next novel, The Risen: A Novel of Spartacus. Steven Crossley is doing the narration and the audiobook will pub at the same time as the book, May 3rd.

In February, PBS NewsHour featured Martín Espada (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) and his new book of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. Check out both the television story and the online reading.

April’s a busy month for Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction). He’ll be on several panels at the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival in New Orleans as well as reading from new work there. He’s also judging the Bethesda Magazine Teen Fiction Contest as well as the Green Briar Review fiction contest. Finally, if you’re in the DC area, you can catch his class “Breaking Through Writer’s Block” at legendary Politics & Prose bookstore.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute play Houston will be part of the Students’ Short Play Festival at the Community College of Rhode Island, Liston Campus (One Hilton St.- Room 1120; 401.455.6116), April 20-23 at 7:30 p.m. and April 23-24 at 2:00 p.m.

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51ggQvO+PtL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Debra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) essay “The Perils of Travel” was published in Paris, Etc., a new anthology that explores what Paris means to writers who have visited and lived in this fascinating city.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to be on the writing faculty at the Hobart Book Village Festival of Women Writers 2016, co-founded by Breena Clarke; please visit the new blog and website for information and consider signing up for September in the beautiful “book reading capital of America.”

Reunite with some Stonecoast alums, and learn lots in the process at Bay Path University’s 13th Writers’ Day on the Longmeadow, MA, campus on April 16th. Stonecoast alumna Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) will be speaking on “Image Gold Rush: Mining Photographs for Narratives,” and alumna Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, ’04) talk will focus on “Liars, Criminals, and Lovers: The World of the Story/Fiction 101.” Stonecoast faculty member Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), Bay Path’s writer-in-residence and director of writing programs, will be there to greet you.

A full production of “Mags: A Conversation with an Audience,” based on Suzanne Strempek Shea’s book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, will be staged at the Majestic Theater in West Springfield, MA, June 9-12. Tickets go on sale in May. The Majestic was the site of the first reading of the play back in November. A reading of the play also will be held July 27 at the Bee Hive Theater in Dingle, Co. Kerry, Ireland, the adopted home town of Mags Riordan, subject of This Is Paradise and founder of the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Cape Maclear, Malawi. Connemara actor Tegolin Knowland will portray Mags. Both events will benefit the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic, which saves lives daily in a remote area that once had a single doctor for 800,000 residents.

In the wake of her essay on Portland in the 1970s that ran in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne has been sought for more quotes on the city’s scene way back when. The Bangor Daily News includes Suzanne in this piece.

Suzanne is also spending a lot of time these days cheering on her husband Tommy, whom some Stonecoasters might have met at residencies along the way. A former award-winning journalist who once covered the Red Sox (quite a job for a Yankees fan), Tommy has co-authored Dingers: The 101 Most Memorable Home Runs in Baseball History. To be released April 6 by Sports Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, and co-written by Joshua Shifrin, the book tells the stories of the authors’ choices of the top 100 homers and how each affected the game of baseball. Details are at www.tommysheastadium.com

 

 

 

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