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Community News & Updates June 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE STONECOAST MFA VIRTUAL WRITING SERIES
Join us Monday, June 8th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. for “Rolled in Sugar: Food as an Entry into a Moment” with Stonecoast Director Justin Tussing. Like Proust’s madeleine, we’ll talk about food and writing and where both can take us. Link to join is here. The Stonecoast Virtual Writing Series is an effort to connect our community and continue learning together from afar. Led by a faculty member or guest instructor, sessions are held monthly.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Lauren Erin O’Brien‘s (Fiction, S’20) poem “After She Reads the Court Records” is forthcoming in the Fall/Winter 2020 issue of Witness.

 

FACULTY

Martín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new collection of poems, called Floaters, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January 2021.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about sports, crime, and social issues. In May, he wrote a feature about baseball for ESPN’s The Undefeated: J.L. Wilkinson Stood Out as the Only White Owner in the First Official Negro League. His next young-adult book is due out in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists wrongly convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) forthcoming Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, was named one of fall’s most anticipated titles by CrimeReads/LitHub. She was interviewed by The Coode Street Podcast, discussing pandemic reading. Her recent reviews include Megan Capisi’s Sin Eater and N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became, both for The Washington Post.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) was profiled in The San Diego Union Tribune on Saturday, May 24.

Authors Ryan Craig Bradford and Nancy Holder

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and her theater cohorts are finding ways for the Shows to Go On in these challenging times: Michael Teoli, composer and “co-conspirator” with Elizabeth on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, performed two of his and Elizabeth’s songs from their rock opera in May on the Los Angeles-based Stealing Focus Digital Cabaret.
In a new May interview, the stars of the 2020 TheatreZone production of Tonya & Nancy—Whitney Winfield and Nikki Miller—discuss their “joyous” experience doing the rock opera in February and also the new realities of the theater world since then, on ZoomIntoTheZone.

Elizabeth and composer Michael Teoli, who did the music on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, with book & lyrics by Elizabeth

Join Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) online June 1 at 1:00 p.m. for a conversation with Meredith O’Brien, author of the newly released Uncomfortably Numb, her memoir on the life-altering diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and on the practice of narrative medicine. The free event will include some details about Bay Path University’s upcoming Narrative Medicine Certificate. Please register for the webinar here.

 

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, was mentioned in a recent New York Times essay by Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk. Macdonald’s essay on pandemic quarantine and birdwatching is available at this link.

Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction, W’19) was interviewed on episode 92 of a podcast called Thrill Seekers Radio with Alex Dolan to help advertise The Jack Harper Trilogy (Pivot, Perish, and Peak).

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) appeared at the 2020 SFWA Nebula Conference on the “Finishing What You Didn’t Start: Editors Making Projects Their Own” panel.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) had a short story published in the May-June issue of Uncanny Magazine called “Through the Veil.”

J Brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) essay “Kaden has Covid” was a winner of Beyond Words Literary Magazine’s Dream Challenge and appears in the June issue online and in hard copy (essay can also be read in eir website jbrookewrites.com).

The ephemera reading series has gone virtual! Co-chaired by KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) and editor Jen R. Albert, ephemera is a monthly reading series showcasing diverse SFF. Catch the next event on June 17th, 7:00 p.m. ET, live on YouTube. ephemera was also recently nominated for an Aurora Award in the Best Fan Organizational category. It is funded by the Ontario Arts Council.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce the charity anthology Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES is now available as both a paperback and ebook! This book is a culmination of a long year of work and a lot of help from some amazing creatives with Julie at the helm as Editor-in-Chief. Playful, whimsical, or dark, but always thoughtful and tinged with the inexplicably weird, the Weird Dream Society brings together twenty-three stories from the most innovative creators in speculative fiction, including Nathan Ballingrud, Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Gregory Norman Bossert, Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), Christopher Brown, Emily Cataneo, Julie C. Day, Michael J Deluca, Gemma Files, A.T. Greenblatt, Nin Harris, Chip Houser, James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty), Marianne Kirby, Kathrin Köhler, Matthew Kressel, Jordan Kurella, Premee Mohamed, Sarah Read, Sofia Samatar, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13), Steve Toase, and A.C. Wise. All proceeds from the anthology go to RAICES, which envisions a compassionate society where all people have the right to migrate and human rights are guaranteed.
Paperback: Amazon | Barnes&Noble | IndieBound.org
eBook: Amazon | Kobo | B&N Nook | Weightless Books
What Others Are Saying

  • “I adore it…These stories are what weird should be. Each one is a different subgenre and [yet] its own beast all together…I’m just feeling electrified by the stories in this collection…they are all connected in the places that matter. They are weird, they are genre, and they contain fantastic prose I’ll keep coming back to over and over again.” ~Paul Jessup, Vernacular Books Guest Review
  • “..the dream-like quality of the stories delivers on the promise of the title….the collection as a whole weaves in moments of profound strangeness, places where the rules of the universe seem to bend and buckle….There are ghosts of a shopping mall, and little girls with superpowers, and a man who can change skins….For fans of dark fantasy and science fiction, there’s a whole lot to like….And there are still moments of hope and clarity, tucked in among the shattered dreams the collection catalogs.” ~Charles Payseur, Quick Sip Reviews  

In addition to the anthology, Julie’s story “After the Apocalypse There Will Be Memory Poems” can now be found in the May 3rd issue of Vol.1 Brooklyn as part of their Sunday Stories series. This is a redrafted version of a piece from Julie’s thesis and a story that demanded a home. Julie’s story “Speculative Execution” is out this month in the anthology The Way of the Laser: Future Crime Stories, edited Stonecoast alums Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) and Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11). It’s a story about A.I.-infused glass, theft, and friendship in a networked city where no one is entirely alone.

Jessica de Koninck‘s (Poetry, S’11) poem “Virtual Seder” was a winner in the Writer’s Almanac Pandemic Poetry Contest. In an interview, Garrison Keillor discussed the poem with her as well as reading her poem “Repairs.” The full Zoom interview can be seen on the Writer’s Almanac website.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) published a flash creative nonfiction piece, “The Simplest Recipe,” in Hippocampus.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) won a Nebula Award in the category of Game Writing for his work on The Outer Worlds, a spacefaring RPG that values player agency, player choice, and tells a story as morbid as it is fun. This is Paul’s first nomination, his first award, and as of writing this he’s celebrating with his cat. He’s currently working on an expansion to the game, launch date TBD.

Nylah Carpenter Lyman (Poetry, S’10) has had a poem titled “Making a Field” selected for Poetic License, a written word and visual arts exhibition, managed in collaboration by The Poetry Barn and the Arts Society of Kingston, NY. The process first involved having her poem chosen by the editorial team at Poetic License as a finalist.  Those poems were then forwarded on to visual artists at ASK. Once there, her poem was one of those selected by a visual artist, and so it will be mounted with the artist’s interpretation in an exhibition to be held in August 2020 at ASK’s gallery. If possible, the poets will be invited to come and read at the exhibition’s opening. The poems, and the paintings that were inspired by them, will be posted in a special issue on our sister site, The Poetry Distillery. While the gallery has been closed due to the COVID-19 crisis, they plan to reopen in June.

The Next Generation Indie Book Awards picked Tom MacDonald’s (Fiction, W’09) Dermot Sparhawk crime series—The Charlestown Connection (2011), Beyond the Bridge (2103), The Revenge of Liam McGrew (2015), Murder in the Charlestown Bricks (2018)—as a finalist in the series category. Also, the crime anthology Coast to Coast: Noir will publish a Dermot Sparhawk short story called “Nashua River Floater” in its 2020 edition, due out in June.

Daily Science Fiction published Dan McMinn’s (Popular Fiction, W’20) short story “Advice for Newbies at WoodCon” on May 5th.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W‘06) is pleased to have her short story “Gridlock” in the spring 2020 issue of Solstice Magazine. It was wonderful working with Lee Hope again!

Starting Saturday, June 6th, Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be teaching Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life, a weekly live Zoom class for five Saturdays, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EDT. For more information, click here.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) creative nonfiction piece, “Things You Gave Me When You Left,” is online at The Real Story. Also, John was recently interviewed for a quarantine podcast by the folks at DUM DUM Zine, where it will be featured online shortly.

The concrete poem “Tree,” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the next issue of The Comstock Review.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Barking Dog Nocturnal” appeared in The Offing.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) short story “What Remains” was recently published in Volume 26 of Quarter After Eight. Her short story “Eve” was named a finalist for Iron Horse Review‘s Trifecta Award in Fiction. Her memoir, The Angle of Flickering Light, has been accepted by Vine Leaves Press and is forthcoming in April 2021.

“Church Camp,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Spring 2020 issue of Trajectory, a journal based in Frankfort, KY.

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

STONECOAST MFA VIRTUAL WRITING SERIES
In an effort to connect our community and continue learning together from afar, Stonecoast is launching a monthly writing session led by a faculty member or guest instructor! Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) kicked off our first session in April with a fantastic Mindfulness and Creative Writing class. We are thrilled to present Susan Conley (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) on Monday, May 18th, with “Voice Across Genre: Tone and Pitch and How to Really Say What You Are Feeling,” followed by Justin Tussing (Stonecoast Director) on Monday, June 8th, with a pre-residency generative writing session.

Information and Zoom links will be distributed to current students and faculty via email, and to the greater community via the Stonecoast Portland Meetup group and the Friends of Stonecoast MFA Facebook Group. If you are unable to access any of these platforms, email Special Projects Coordinator Jenny O’Connell (jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu) to be added to the list.

You can also receive weekly writing prompts from faculty on the Stonecoast Facebook Page.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Natalie Harris-Spencer (Fiction) has been selected by Oyster River Pages for publication under their “Emerging Fiction Voices” category, established to showcase new writers who are just beginning to submit their work to journals. Her short story “Fish Out of Water” will be published in the Fourth Annual Issue of Oyster River Pages, due Summer 2020 (publication details to follow). ORP is a literary journal that embraces the reality that the personal has become the political and actively seeks to publish those who bring balance and diversity to historical institutions of power.

Nina Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction) recently had another piece up on the Brevity blog about how the lockdown has provided her with a much welcomed focus on writing, stripped of the otherwise regular and non-essential diversions. She has also embarked on a new project and is looking for contributors: If you know someone who is a Jew by choice, the planned anthology Our Stories, Our Tribe: Personal Essays by Converts to Judaism is looking for diverse voices in essays between 1500-4000 words. Email Nina (nblichtenstein@gmail.com) if you would like a copy of the Call for Submissions to share.

 

FACULTY

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) was happy that her novel We Got Him was chosen to be featured in April on Snowflakes in a Blizzard, which highlights books by Indie press writers. As noted in this piece, We Got Him, which was published by New Rivers Press, is also out in a 2018 audiobook version—published and narrated by star Stonecoast alumna Tanya Eby and her audiobook company, Blunder Woman Productions.

 

ALUMS

The film short The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, adapted by Elisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) from her memoir of the same title, won a Special Jury Mention from the ÉCU—The European Independent Film Festival in Paris, and an Honorable Mention from the USA Film Festival’s International Short Film & Video Competition in Dallas, Texas.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) made a guest post called “The Sophomore Book” about writing her next book on Fantasy Cafe for Women in SF&F Month. She also had a new poem published by The Free Library of the Internet Void called “Remember.” And AAWW Radio posted Breaking into Speculative Fiction, a panel discussion with Jenn and Malka Older, moderated by Tim O’Connell.

j brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) essay “Hybrid” was the Nonfiction Winner for Columbia Journal’s Womxn’s History Month Special Issue.

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’14) is excited to announce that she has found a means to get out and share her book The Bone Cutters during this pandemic. From May 11 to June 11, Renee is doing an online book tour, where her work will be featured on 50+ blogs. There will be a video reading, an interview, an excerpt or two, as well as free giveaways. Here is the link to find out how and where to check it all out. Stay safe, everyone!

teri elam’s (Poetry, S19) poetry manuscript was recently named a semi-finalist for the Two Sylvias Press Wilder Prize. During April, a film based on her poem “Butterflies” premiered during Visual Poetry Project’s online film celebration of National Poetry Month.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was thrilled to have her essay “Faith in a Seed,” about motherhood and the extinction and rebirth of the American chestnut tree, published in the current issue of Spire: The Maine Journal of Conservation and Sustainability.

Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short story “Harlem in Havana” was released April 7, 2020, in the anthology The Beat of Black Wings: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of Joni Mitchelledited by Josh Pachter, published by Untreed Reads. Anthology authors Alison, Alan Orloff, and Elaine Viets taught a class on Writing Suspense via Zoom on April 26, 2020.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) and Robin Talbot (Stonecoast Associate Director) invite the Stonecoast community to a Virtual Book Event at PRINT Bookstore in Portland on May 13, 2020, at 7:00 pm. Co-hosted by Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance (MWPA) via Zoom, Ellen will read from her new novel, Her Sister’s Tattoo, and talk with Robin. To register, visit here or here.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) stories “Sola Fide” (originally featured in the summer 2016 issue of Able Muse), “Avoidance,” and “Meaning As Use” are all featured as the fiction portion of Lights, the inaugural issue of Pleasure Boat Studio‘s new zine, available as a free PDF. John also read his story “Good Friday,” originally featured in Volume VI of The New Guard, on Good Friday for West Seattle’s own Pegasus Book Exchange.

Jenny O’Connell‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) recent tribute to the late, great Ryan West—which doubles as an ode to the ultimate frisbee community—was published in Ultiworld magazine. Her essay “Valley of the Bulls” won the 2019 Appalachia Journal Humor in the Wild Contest, and is now available in print. An outdoor contributor for Maine Magazine, Jenny’s profile on camp owner and adventurer Chloë Rowse was published in March, and she has a forthcoming feature on ice climbing in Maine later this year. In April, Jenny signed with agents Jamie Chambliss and Steve Troha of Folio Literary Management, who will represent her book project, Finding Petronella

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) was recently awarded a media grant from the Ontario Arts Council for her experimental short You’re Smart, her first foray into non-narrative filmmaking. While production is presently on hold due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, she hopes to complete her film in the following year.

Three short pieces from sid sibo’s (Fiction, W’19) in-process collection Familiar: Stories have been awarded the Neltje Blanchan Memorial award from the Wyoming Arts Council for best writing “informed by a relationship with the natural world.” Two other stories from the collection have earned Honorable Mentions, one of which, “Bull,” will be published online in Cutthroat magazine. The pen name can be traced to Stonecoast 2019 alum sidney woods.

Patricia Smith’s (Poetry, S’08; former faculty member) poem “Now He’s an Etching” appeared in The Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day email for Thursday, April 16th.; the poem can be read and heard on the poets.org website.

Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W’07) was featured in April’s Voyage LA, an online magazine celebrating the artists and eccentrics that define Los Angeles. The profile features no revelatory bombshells, but there are some fun photos.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, S’04) will have upcoming poetry published in Lily Poetry Review and Soul-Lit. Her book review of Rebecca Foust’s The Unexploded Ordnance Bin was published in Mom Egg Review in April. Lisa’s short story “Lucky” was shortlisted in the 2020 Fish Short Fiction contest, judged by Colum McCann. She has been a mentor through the AWP W2W program this spring, working with a fiction writer from Georgia. And Lisa will have a new collection of poetry published by Arlen House/Syracuse University Press in the spring of 2021.

Rhiannon J. Taylor’s (Popular Fiction, S’19, writing as R. J. Howell) dark fantasy/horror story “What You Lost in the Wildermere” has been published by Arsenika in their sixth issue. Additionally, her story “Parasites” is forthcoming from Frozen Wavelets.

As reported by Locus, Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) won the 2020 Down Under Fan Fund (DUFF), which sends a fan from North America to CoNZealand, the 78th Worldcon. Paul Weimer, the North American DUFF administrator, said, “With ConZealand being a virtual Worldcon this year and Corvid-19, Erin will not be traveling to New Zealand this year, but hopes to travel to Australasia in the DUFF tradition in 2021, health and world events permitting.” Erin will also take over from Weimer as the new North American administrator.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is now the nonfiction editor at The Los Angeles Review. He is looking for fresh, engaging essays; in particular at this moment, he’d love to read about life during COVID-19. You can submit here.

 

 

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Community News & Updates April 2020

Hope everyone is staying safe!

CURRENT STUDENTS

Natalie Harris-Spencer’s (Fiction) short story “Labor Day Weekend” will be published on April 21st in Volume 2 of Allegory Ridge‘s fiction anthology, Archipelago. Allegory Ridge is a magazine for open-minded millennials that publishes travel writing, short stories, poetry, artwork, photography, and personal essays.

FACULTY

The German edition of JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) novel Damnificados, translated by Connie Lösch, was published by Editions Nautilus on March 2nd. The book was positively reviewed in Der Spiegel, Europe’s largest weekly news magazine, the same week.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana Is Here is nominated as a 2019 Indie Book of the Year (LGBTQ fiction) from Foreward Reviews!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) will be leading a free online workshop focused on building resilience through writing for teens, sponsored by the Clarion West Writers Workshop; Stonecoast faculty member emeritus James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction) and current Stonecoast faculty member Tobias Buckell (Popular Fiction) are also instructors.  Recent reviews include N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became and Megan Campisi’s Sin Eater, both for The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) published “Soundstage Musicals: Capturing Theater on Film” in the March 2020 issue of Imagine, the print and online magazine for the New England film community. Her article addresses the filming and streaming of musicals as one way to keep theater alive in these dark times.

ALUMS

Check out Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) current online radio and podcast interviews regarding her book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. In addition to a lot of quirky snail science, the book relates to the pandemic experience, as it includes reflections on isolation and illness. Recent interviews include the following links: interviewed by Indira Naidoo for ABC Nightlife Radio in Sydney, Australia, and interviewed by Emily Kwong for NPR Science Podcast Short Wave.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Amit Gupta’s story “How Did It Feel to Be Eaten?” for the March 12th episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here. He also hosted the March 24th episode of PodCastle, featuring Sofia Samatar’s retelling of “The Tale of Mahliya and Mauhub and the White-Footed Gazelle,” available here.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) has a Snow White retelling coming out in the anthology Arterial Bloom, edited by Mercedes M. Yardley. “Rotten” was the story she submitted with her application to Stonecoast, so she’s happy that is has finally found a home at Crystal Lake Publishing.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce that her novella The Rampant (Aqueduct Press) is a nominated finalist for the 2019 Lambda Literary Award in Science Fiction, Fantasy, and HorrorPublishers Weekly says, “Equal parts playful and heartbreaking, this apocalyptic novella offers one-of-a-kind answers about the end of the world….This clever and surprisingly fun take on the rapture is the perfect theological horror story.” The novella is available in both paperback and as an ebook.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18), PhD candidate in Literature, has been awarded a summer research grant from the University of New Hampshire to continue his work on the erasure of women in science fiction. He is excited to write an article on feminism related to Jesuit philosophy and the universe of Warhammer 40k as his entry point into the world of academic publishing.

 

David A. Hewitt’s (Popular Fiction, S’09) novelette The Great Wall of America, published by Mithila Press, is now available in both Kindle and paperback editions, and his short story “Donald Q. Haute, Gentleman Inquisitator, and the Peril of the Pythogator” will be appearing in the April 2020 issue of Metaphorosis.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is happy to announce that her second full-length poetry collection has been selected as a semifinalist in Tupelo Press’s 2020 Dorset Prize.

Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short story “Harlem in Havana” will be released April 7, 2020, in the anthology The Beat of Black Wings: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of Joni Mitchell, edited by Josh Pachter, published by Untreed Reads. Alison will appear with fellow anthology authors Alan Orloff and Elaine Viets for a panel and signing on April 18th at Murder on the Beach Bookstore in Delray Beach, 6:00 p.m.

What a moment to launch a new novel! Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) is delighted that her fourth novel, Her Sister’s Tattoo, will be published on April 7th. She is working hard to convert her book tour to virtual events—live-streamed readings and Zoom book parties and curated series like A Mighty Blaze and Reading with Robin. Links to Internet events will be posted on her website as they’re set. Interesting times, no?

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) creative nonfiction piece, “Things You Gave Me When You Left” is forthcoming in The Real Story. John will have a solo author event—barring further quarantine—at Paper Boat Booksellers in West Seattle on the evening of May 1st.

dg nanouk okpik’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “When White Hawks Come” was published in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day email on March 30, 2020 (the link also includes an audio recording of the poem).

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that his short story “Soovien Hungered in the City of Spiders” is out at StarShipSofa. It’s a story about poetry-driven spider gladiatorial matches, and other stuff.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) had a streak of publication right before everything changed: an article on wood construction and the future of Maine forests in Northern Woodlands magazine, a “Plant Love Story” about salt marsh grass, an essay on the striped skunk for Natural Resources Council of Maine, and an update on wild Atlantic salmon for The Working Waterfront. Her book, The President’s Salmon, was featured in several new podcasts and cited by Mark Kurlansky in his new book on salmon. And a lyric essay has been accepted by Waterwheel Review.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) recently participated in a six-author online showcase, hosted and broadcast via Zoom by publisher Encircle Publications. His novel Aliens, Drywall, and a Unicycle is now available for pre-order here.

Eugenio Volpe (Fiction, W’05) has an essay coming out in the summer issue of Massachusetts Review entitled “Jesus Kicks His Oedipus Complex.”

“Steve’s Ashes,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Summer 2020 issue of Evening Street Review, a journal of Evening Street Press of Sacramento.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates December 2019

FACULTY

The French translation of JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) novel Damnificados, entitled Les Dévastés and translated by Camille Nivelle, has won the Prix Révélation de Traduction from Société des Gens de Lettres. The ceremony takes place in Paris on December 3rd, 2019.

Stonecoast faculty member Tobias S. Buckell (Popular Fiction) and co-author Paolo Bacigalupi won the World Fantasy Award for Best Collection with The Tangled Lands, a fantasy novel told in four novella-length parts about a land crippled by the use of magic. Buckell also sold new novel The Musketress to Audible Originals: in a far-future world where reading has been forbidden by mechanical archangels a general’s daughter and fugitive librarian search for world-changing secrets found in ancient, lost books.

Tom Coash‘s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) monologue, “Blind Dog,” was produced in New York City by The Playground Experiment as part of the Faces of America Monologue Festival in support of the ACLU. “Blind Dog” has also been published in the Faces of America Anthology.

The paperback edition of Susan Conley‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) novel Elsey Come Home has been published by Vintage. Susan’s forthcoming novel Landslide will be published by Knopf in February of 2021.

Martín Espada (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) has edited and published a new anthology entitled What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump from Northwestern University Press.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) received two special mentions, in both fiction and creative non-fiction, in the 2020 Pushcart Prizes: his short story “Refugees” (published in The Bennington Review) and his essay “Sweetness Mattered” (published in Tin House) were both honored.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) profiled Blondie frontwoman Debbie Harry for the pop culture site Please Kill Me. Her novel Curious Toys was named one of autumn’s best reads by Real Simple Magazine, as well as one of 2019’s best books by the Chicago Library, and was featured in Maine Women Magazine. Forthcoming reviews include Priya Sharma’s Ormeshadow, Tade Thompson’s The Survival of Molly Southborne, and Craig Laurance Gidney’s A Spectral Hue for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Several chapters for Lauren Marie Schmidt‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Justice) YA novel-in-progress, The Players, are forthcoming in the following journals: North American ReviewMobius: The Journal for Social Change, and The MacGuffinClick here to learn more about the project and here to read samples.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has a new short film, produced via LGBT Toronto Film Festival. The five-minute short, Sister Kin, is based on a studio recording of a single scene by Elizabeth. The ‘Screenplay Short’ film will screen at LGBT Toronto Film Festival in 2020. A longer short film, Four-Sided, also based on Elizabeth’s novel, has been an official selection at nine festivals so far this year and will screen next in Chicago. Elizabeth’s feature-film script has been recognized at 20 festivals or competitions. Elizabeth looks forward to leading Stonecoast’s first hands-on Screen Your Short seminar for students wanting to write and shoot a short film. For updates on Elizabeth’s film projects, see www.afoursidedbedfilm.com

 

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) film short adaptation of her memoir, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, won the Best International Short Award at the Kerry International Film Festival in Kerry, Ireland.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) placed her poem “Lepus antilocapra” in HWA Poetry Showcase Vol. VI, edited by Stephanie Wytovich. This piece found its final form under the guidance of Cate Marvin. In other news, her short story “Gaze with Undimmed Eyes and the World Drops Dead” is featured in the anthology Terror at 5280′. This piece originated from a ghost story prompt in workshop with Liz Hand.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has a story in Lightspeed Magazine this month: “The Path of Pins, the Path of Needles” is available from December 5th. Her flash piece “By Jingly Bell, By Velvet Mouse” also came out from PodCastle recently.

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, S’11) has a poem, “Good Humor”, in the most recent edition of Glassworks. Its online segment, “Looking Glass,” includes her reflections on the poem. Her poem “Crazy Eights” appears in the most recent edition of Presence. “Lullaby Ghazal” is in Southword (Munster Literary Center), and her poem “Revisiting the Psalms” is included in the anthology A Constellation of Kisses from Terrapin Books. Finally, her poem, “Pastoral”, was the daily poem on SWIMM on Friday, November 29, 2019.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) was featured on the literary journal Barnstorm‘s website; you can read the tale of how he sold his first short story here.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) poems “The Girl Who Became So Still” and “The God Hour” will be published in the New Rivers anthology Wild Gods: The Ecstatic in Contemporary Poetry and Prose.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was honored to have her essay “Persistence Is the Thing with Fins” selected for inclusion in A Dangerous New World: Maine Voices on the Climate Crisis, which comes out this month from Littoral Books. A book launch party will be held on Sunday, December 8th, from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. at Space Gallery in Portland, Maine. Also, Andrea was also thrilled that her short story “The Quilt” was short-listed for the Peaceful Dumpling Environmental Writing Prize.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ‘06) has recent essays published in Ms Magazine“No More Coat Hangers”—and Lilith Magazine“When Life Imitates Your Own Art.”

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short-fiction pieces “Avoidance,” “Meaning As Use,” and “Sola Fide” (the last of which was originally published in Able Muse, summer 2016) will be featured in Pleasure Boat Studio’s first biannual zine this December. Additionally, John will read “Sola Fide” at a Soul Food Coffee House event this December 19th.

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) is elated to announce that her live-action/animated film Rialia (2019) is an official selection at the National Screen Institute of Canada’s Online Short Film Festival and was their weekly featured film. Her short film The Bakebook (2017) will also be screening in Italy at the CineCiok Festival.

Dave Patterson (Fiction, W’13) had his novel, Soon the Light Will be Perfect, recently reviewed in The Portland Press Herald. The reviewer noted that the novel is “a beautiful exploration of what it means to come of age in difficult circumstances.”

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) was selected to participate in the third annual Poets and Artists in Dialogue at The Grosse Pointe Congregational Church in Michigan. Two of Linda’s poems are published with accompanying art in the full-color book. The reading is January 9th, 2020.

Mary Katherine Spain (Fiction, S’16) has been awarded semi-finalist status in the Machigonne Fiction Contest sponsored by The New Guard Literary Review. Her short story “Collision” will be published in Volume IX of The New Guard Literary Review in 2020.

An anthology of poems and essays on the climate threat by Maine Writers, A Dangerous New World: Maine Voices on the Climate Crisis, edited by Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’13) and Meghan Sterling, has been published by Littoral Books and can be purchased online here—or at the publication party at Space Gallery on December 8th in Portland. All Stonecoasters and their friends are invited! Also, The Portland Phoenix recently published an article about the anthology.

Morgan Talty‘s (Fiction, W’19) short story “Earth, Speak” will be published this December in Shenandoah‘s winter issue; the editors of Shenandoah have also nominated the story for a Pushcart.

Allister Timms (Popular Fiction, ‘13) has published his novel The Killing Moon with PS Publishing, the UK’s foremost specialist genre publisher of horror, sci-fi, and fantasy. The artwork for the novel is by Italian artist Daniele Serra, winner of the 2017 British Fantasy Award for Best Artist. The Washington Post has included The Killing Moon in its “Best Horror Fiction of the Year.” Allister Timms is from Wales and now lives in Belfast, Maine, and teaches Literature at Husson University in Bangor. Allister can be found at https://allistertimms16.wixsite.com/home

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Community News & Updates October 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SUBMISSIONS OPEN: The Learned Pig

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) is currently a guest editor at the UK magazine The Learned Pig. Her “Root Mapping” section is an exploration of mapping place instead of space. What is sparked when today’s mapping is guided by a desire for connection and beauty instead of domination, when maps are living creations that arise from engagement and attention? Submissions of poetry, literary nonfiction, photo essays, and interviews are all welcome through October 31st.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: The Way of the Laser: Future Crime

Vernacular Books, an indie press venture created by Joe McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) and Eric Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) is pleased to announce they are accepting submissions for the anthology The Way of the Laser: Future Crime stories.

What we’re looking for: 

Crime stories that take place in the future. Preferably these stories will go beyond simple murders or capers to reveal something about how technology and the powers that wield it have changed our world. Is poisoning the nanobots responsible for programming the ads in your neural feed a crime? Is organized crime society’s only hope or responsible for its downfall? Consider what will constitute a crime and what unique problems it poses for your characters.

Keep in mind what is criminal behavior one day may be legal the next and vice versa. We want to see people caught up in the pitfalls of society ruled by corporations, ideologies, and demagogues and what lengths they will go to when there simply is no other choice.

Wow us with your original idea and blow us away with your writing.

Length: 4,000-8,000 words

Payment: $.05/word advance + royalties.

For SUBMISSION GUIDELINES visit www.vernacularbooks.com/submissions/

To support this project via Kickstarter, visit https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/vernacularbooks/the-way-of-the-laser-future-crime-stories 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jac Evans’ (Popular Fiction) short story “Scales” appeared in Issue 30 of Three-Lobed Burning Eye, published on August 30! This story was workshopped in her very first Stonecoast residency.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has signed a new book deal with Tu Books for his middle-grade solar-punk fantasy novel, The Shadow Prince. It won’t enter the world until some time in 2021, but he’s happy. In November, he’ll be a guest at the first Reno Pop Culture Con.

Aaron Hamburger‘s tour for Nirvana Is Here rolls on, with stops at Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor, at 7:00 p.m., Thursday, October 3rd; a reading and conversation at the Fall for the Book Festival at George Mason University at noon on Friday, October 11th; an appearance at the Rainbow Book Fair in New York on Saturday, October 12th; and a stop in Arlington, VA, for the Readings on the Pike reading series, Wednesday, October 15th at 7:30 p.m. Aaron will also be featured as part of the Detroit Public Library Author Series on Sunday, October 27th at 2:30 p.m., and will participate in the National Press Club Book Festival On Friday, November 1st. Keep up with all of Aaron’s latest events here.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction) novel Curious Toys, out October 15th, has received glowing early reviews, including raves from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus and starred reviews in Booklist and Library Journal, as well as advance praise from Audrey Niffenegger, Sarah Weinman, Peter Straub, and Bradford Morrow, among others. Liz will be appearing at the Strand Bookstore in New York City on October 16th, in conversation about the book with Benjamin Dreyer; at Solid State Books in D.C. with Michael Dirda on October 17th; at Anderson’s Bookstore in Chicago with Sarah Weinman on October 24th; and at the WORD Festival in Blue Hill, Maine, on October 26th, where she’ll be in conversation with Joe Hill and Laura Miller. Her forthcoming reviews include Rene Denfeld’s The Butterfly Girl in The Washington Post.

Cara Hoffman‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) debut children’s novel Bernard Pepperlin, out this fall from Harper Collins, was a Jr. Library Guild Selection, received a starred review in Kirkus, and earned glowing reviews in Publishers Weekly and School Library Journal which compared Bernard Pepperlin to books by Roald Dahl and E.B. White.

Robert Levy‘s (Popular Fiction) novella Anaïs Nin at the Grand Guignol is out this month from Lethe Press. Kirkus Reviews says, “Readers looking for a concentrated cocktail of Années folles splendor will find that this short erotic novel quenches their thirst. A finely crafted, Anaïs Nin–centered fantasy with unexpected depths,” while Publishers Weekly in a Starred Review writes, “Levy’s disquieting erotic imagery masterfully evokes Nin’s original prose. This sensual confection will enthrall readers looking for an intimate, disturbing thrill.”

Cate Marvin (Poetry) is this year’s editor of Best New Poets: 50 Poems from Emerging Writers, a series curated by Jed Livingood.

At the 2019 Massachusetts Independent Film Festival in September, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) won Best Feature Film Screenplay and the short film Four-Sided, based on Elizabeth’s novel, was screened on the Festival’s closing night, September 7th. Elizabeth attended the Festival with Amy Carpenter Scott, one of the producers developing Elizabeth’s script, A Four-Sided Bed, as a feature film. Also in September, Elizabeth’s script was named a Finalist at the Northeast Film Festival and the short film Four-Sided was a Finalist at Moondance International Film Festival. See updates here.

Elizabeth and A Four-Sided Bed producer Amy Carpenter Scott at the 2019 Massachusetts Independent Film Festival

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) film short adaptation of her memoir The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating won the international Jackson Wild Media Award in the Education category. The film has an upcoming Canadian premier at the Edmunton International Film Festival and was recently reviewed in the San Francisco Examiner.  

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) published two short stories recently: “Better” in The Saturday Evening Post and “The Escape Artists” in The Normal School.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) was awarded the inaugural Ladies of Horror Fiction (LOHF) Writers Grant, which was funded by indie author Steve Stred.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) and PodCastle co-editor Jen R. Albert are pleased to announce their creation of a new speculative fiction reading series. Funded by the Ontario Arts Council, ephemera will feature literary speculative fiction with a focus on emerging and underrepresented voices. Starting in November, it will run the first Wednesday of every month at the Glad Day Bookshop, Toronto.  Follow ephemera on Twitter and Instagram @ephemeraseries.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce that Aqueduct Press has just released her 140-page novella, The Rampant, as a paperback and ebook:

Christianity it turns out got a whole lot of things wrong. It’s ten years since the hordes of old-world Sumerian gods arrived in Southern Indiana ready to kick off the end of the world. Massive tornadoes, tsunamis, government collapse: it all started out so strong, but the Rampant, the final herald of the apocalypse, failed to show. Both people and gods have had to adjust. Sixteen-year-old Emelia Bareilles and Gillian Halkey have spent most of their childhood stuck in this seemingly never-ending apocalypse. Now the two friends are resolute: they will travel into the lands of the dead and force a change.

Paperback:  Amazon | Publisher

eBook:  Amazon | Publisher

Goodreads list.

What others are saying

“Equal parts playful and heartbreaking, this apocalyptic novella offers one-of-a-kind answers about the end of the world….This clever and surprisingly fun take on the rapture is the perfect theological horror story.” ~Publishers Weekly

“Day perfectly balances dark and light in The Rampant, and offers up a fresh take on apocalyptic fiction that draws on ancient mythology and literature to create something that feels completely original and new.” ~The Book Smugglers Women to Read

Josh Gauthier’s (Popular Fiction, S’17) debut full-length play Of Murder and Madness opens in early October at Footlights Theatre in Falmouth, Maine. The show runs from October 10-26, and tickets are on sale now. Visit the Footlights Theatre website for full details.

Nancy Hayden (Fiction S’12) and her husband John Hayden are excited about the September release of their new book, Farming on the Wild Side: The Evolution of a Regenerative Organic Farm and Nursery from Chelsea Green Publishing. The book explores growing fruit and perennial vegetables, enhancing native biodiversity for pollinators, beneficial insects, and birds, and increasing resilience in the face of climate change. Its hopeful message is combined with the authors’ color photographs of their Vermont farm.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has been elected president of Ozarks Writers League, which is headquartered in Branson, Missouri, but includes Arkansas as well. She will preside over a spring and a fall conference with national speakers.

Alan King‘s (Poetry, W’13) Drift, the audiobook, is now available on Audible. Learn more here.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) co-wrote a game called The Outer Worlds, which launches October 25th on PC and consoles. The Outer Worlds is a dark sci-fi satire about consumerism and corporate greed in space, full of fun shooty combat and opportunities for creative roleplay. You can find the latest trailer here (and below).

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) is delighted to reveal the cover of her fourth novel, Her Sister’s Tattoo, coming in April from Red Hen Press. Angela Davis blurbed the book with this quote: “The elegant restraint of Ellen Meeropol’s prose and the painstaking precision of her vision offer us discerning glimpses over decades and generations into the complexities of political engagement—its big questions and especially its intimacies. At a time when radical movements are on the rise, we find in Her Sister’s Tattoo exactly what we now need: both caution and hope.” Elli will be doing an ARC-drop road trip to New England indie bookstores this fall, so if you have suggestions about bookstores likely to be interested in a political novel, please let her know.

Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be at the Lewiston Public Library October 5th from 3:00-4:30 p.m. to discuss Memoirs and Loss with Suzanne Farrell Smith. Murray will be back at the Lewiston Public Library on October 26th teaching a Memoir Workshop from 1:30 to 3:30 in the afternoon. Both events are free and open to the public.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) story “Beth Garland Realizes Her Date is a Serial Killer” will be featured online in Parhelion Literary Magazine this October. John read this same piece at a Stonecoast Faculty & Guest event during his summer Teaching Apprenticeship.

Carolyn O’Doherty (Popular Fiction, W’11) is delighted to announce that her debut novel, Rewind, won the 2018 Oregon Spirit Book Award from the Oregon Council of Teachers of English. The award is given annually to the author of a distinguished contribution to young adult literature that engages and encourages readers’ imagination, discovery, and understanding, reflecting the spirit and values held by Oregonians. Carolyn’s second novel, Unleashed, the sequel to Rewind, was released in September 2019.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry W’17) will be the featured poet at Amesbury (Massachusetts) Public Library’s Fall Poetry Series on Tuesday, October 22nd, at 6:00 p.m.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has contracted her latest novel, Cow Palace, with B Ink Publishing; the book will be published in 2021. She will be reading from her most recently published book, Tapiser, at the Boothbay Public Library on Saturday, October 12th, at 2:00 p.m.; she will also be the guest at Union’s Vose Library for their annual “Soup & Suspense” fundraiser on Thursday, October 17th, at 6:30 p.m.

“On the Ridge,” a poem about the search for a man lost in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the forthcoming issue of The American Journal of Poetry.

An essay, “Upstairs Love,” by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) appears in the fall issue of Ovunque Siamo: New Italian-American Writing. Upcoming: Lisa and fellow Stonecoaster Anthony D’Aries will read together at I AM Books in Boston (November 9th); she will present two sessions at the Philadelphia Writing Workshop (November 23rd); and lead a three-day memoir workshop (January 17-20) at the Winter Poetry & Prose Getaway in Atlantic City, NJ, presented by Murphy Writing/Stockton University.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has an essay on the importance of Maine, and wonder, to Rachel Carson, in Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine,  and another about the monuments of oyster shells made by Wabanaki ancestors, in Island Journal. She wrote the cover story on Atlantic salmon for Maine Audubon’s Habitat magazine Summer Issue,  and she will be talking about salmon and signing copies of The President’s Salmon at Maine Audubon on October 3rd. Schmitt will be moderating a Maine Writers and Publishers Alliance discussion on “Finding a Publisher” at the Bangor Public Library on October 19th.

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Community News & Updates July 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

It’s Boston Poetry Marathon time again! This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon is Friday-Sunday, August 16, 17, and 18, and …WE HAVE REALLY EXCITING NEWS! *We will be in a NEW LOCATION this year!* We are having this year’s Marathon at The Community Church of Boston at 565 Boylston St in Copley Square. This year’s event times are Friday, August 16th, from 6:00-10:30 p.m., Saturday, August 17th, from 12:00-10:30 p.m. (with a dinner break around 5:30, starting up again at 7:00 p.m.), and Sunday, August 18th, from 12:00-6:00 p.m. As always: every reader gets eight minutes each. For the third year running, Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09) is an organizer of this 20+ year-old Boston-area poetry festival tradition. This year’s lineup is TBD, but past years’ Stonecoast participants include alums Florine Melnyk, Carol Berg, Christine Tierney, and Vanesa Pacheco, and faculty Richard Hoffman and D. Nurkse. Admission is free but donations are welcome and appreciated. We are collecting donations ahead of time to help us with this year’s event at the new location. Learn more here. Event details are can be found here.

FACULTY

Candor Arts, in collaboration with Illinois Humanities and their #IllinoisTurns200, produced a risograph broadside of Tara Betts‘ (Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) Illinois Bicentennial poem. The broadside also features illustrations by Kiki Dupont. Betts’ poem nods at the sesquicentennial Gwendolyn Brooks wrote in ’68 to mark 150 years of statehood. Betts’ broadside will be given to the winners of the Gwendolyn Brooks Youth Poetry Awards (#GWBYPA19) on August 10th, 2019.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has agreed to a two-book deal with Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group. His first young-adult book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight between America and Hitler, was released in June. In its review, Booklist calls the book “a knockout.” School Library Journal says it “reads as smoothly as a novel” and recommends it for “all public and school libraries.” Last week, John and his writing partner (and wife), Ouisie Shapiro, discussed the book’s themes on ESPN radio; you can hear the interview here.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) was interviewed by novelist Kris Jansma for Electric Literature, which called his novel Nirvana Is Here “a pure joy to read on every page.” The Rupture also published a glowing review of Nirvana, calling it “an expertly written, bold, funny, serious novel.” DC fans, take note: on July 3rd, Aaron will be on a panel at the legendary Ask Rayceen Show doors opening at 6:00 p.m. He’ll also be teaching Publishing 101 at the Writer’s Center on July 10th, 7:00-9:00 p.m., as well as a special class on the novel Landfall by Thomas Mallon at Politics and Prose on July 14th, 2:00-4:00 p.m.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will accept the Grand Master Award, presented by the International Association of Media Tie-In Writers, at San Diego Comic-Con on July 19 at 2:00 p.m. in Room 32 AB. There will be an autograph session afterwards with a panel of tie-in writers in the Sails Pavilion. Here is the press release from the association:

Not many women get to play in over ten different universes, let alone create several of their own. Yet that is exactly what Nancy Holder makes look so very—and deceptively—easy to her myriad and devoted fans.

Every year, the International Association of Media Tie-In writers selects a grandmaster of tie-in writing to receive the Faust, IAMTW’s lifetime achievement award. For 2019, it is the IAMTW’s great pleasure to present the Faust to Nancy Holder. Her tie-in work runs the gamut from Firefly to Saving Grace. She’s written Angel in the Buffyverse, and Zorro in the seventeenth century. She novelized the Wonder Woman, Crimson Peak, and Ghostbusters movies, and wrote about a Feline Felon, and a pup in Wishbone. Above and beyond her media work, she’s co-created the YA series Wicked and Crusade.

Of the Bram Stoker award-winning and NYT bestselling author, IAMTW president Jonathan Maberry says, “Nancy is not only a superb writer and a smart businesswoman, but also a kind and compassionate member of the writing community.”

The IAMTW congratulates Grandmaster Nancy Holder on receiving the 2019 Faust Award.

More film news for Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting): her screenplay A Four-Sided Bed won Best Dramatic Screenplay at Hollywood Boulevard Film Festival in June, as well as Best First Time Feature Screenplay at Festivious Film Festival-LA, and was a Finalist at the Filmatic Drama Screenplay Awards. Over a dozen contests and festivals have given award recognition to Elizabeth’s script this year. The script will be featured in a full Staged Reading performance at the 15th Annual ReelHeART International Film and Screenplay Festival on July 5th in Toronto; Elizabeth will attend the film festival and do a Q/A after the staged reading. Later in July, Elizabeth’s script will be featured in a Best Scenes short read at the festival LGBT Toronto. Please see the updated website: http://www.afoursidedbedfilm.com

ALUMS

Jillian Abbott (Popular Fiction, S’04) has been invited to participate on a panel on the Ethics of Storytelling at Mix Digital, an international conference of digital writing at Bath Spa University in the UK on Monday, July 1, 2019; she also received a grant from the PSC_CUNY to attend the conference. The panel is moderated by writer Nikesh Shukladescribed by Foreign Affairs Magazine as one of the top 100 thinkers in the world and by The Bookseller as one of the 100 most influential people in publishing. Also on the panel is Digital Curator from the British Museum, Stella Wisdom, and British novelist Rosie Garland. More details can be found here.

The short-film adaptation of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) memoir, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, has three launches in July. The film’s Australian launch is at the Revelation Perth International Film Festival July 4-17. Two New England launches follow at the Maine International Film Festival at Railroad Square (July 12-21) and then the Woods Hole Film Festival (July 27-August 3). Bailey wrote and directed the film. For more details see wildsnailfilm.org. Also, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating has just been published in Spain in both Catalan (Més Libres) and Spanish (Capitán Swing) and the Spanish edition will have distribution in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Costa Rica, Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Derek Lubangakene’s story “Origami Angels” for the June 13th episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled that her novella, The Rampant, now has both a cover and release date! The Rampant will be released by Aqueduct Press on October 1st, 2019, in both an ebook and paperback edition as part of their Conversation Pieces series.

It’s ten years since the hordes of old-world Sumerian gods arrived in Southern Indiana to kick off the end of the world, but things have not gone to plan. A principal player decided not to show. Now humanity is stuck in a seemingly never-ending apocalypse. Sixteen-year-old Emelia Bareilles and Gillian Halkey are determined to travel into the lands of the dead and force a change.

“I loved the epic journey of our two teenaged lesbian he­roes, Gillian and Emelia, through the sprawling horrors of the Sumerian afterworld. The clash of their modern feminist sensibilities with the cruel and rigid theocracy of the very oldest gods out-weirds much of the New Weird. In The Rampant, Julie Day calls us to visit a fan­tastical landscape in a voice that is hers alone.” ~James Patrick Kelly, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Locus awards

The Rampant was so much fun to read! Is that the right way to blurb a horror novel? I don’t know, but it’s the truth. Julie Day’s novel is smart, playful, sly and, yes, hor­rifying too. A short gem of a book.” ~Victor LaValle, author of The Changeling. Winner of the World Fantasy, Shirley Jackson, and British Fantasy awards.

“The girl-powered post-apocalyptic Sumerian under­world quest I didn’t know I needed.” ~Sarah Pinsker, winner of the Nebula and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award

The Rampant is one of the most original Apocalypse tales I’ve read in ages. Julie C. Day avoids cliché and gives the reader the end-times by way of Sumerian myth—except this particular end-of-the-world stalls when one of its principal players decides not to show up. What unfolds is a journey into the underworld filled with joy and hor­ror, hope and loss. It’s a wise and lovely story—exactly what I’ve come to expect from Day.” ~Nathan Ballingrud, winner of the Shirley Jackson Award; shortlisted for the World Fan­tasy, British Fantasy, and Bram Stoker Awards.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) poem “Waiting for the Lazuli Bunting” was published in the Spring 2019 issue of Birdland Journal, and her poem “Spirit Bear” will be published in the upcoming Marin Poetry Center Anthology. Terri also taught a workshop on the history of haiku for the summer residency of the MFA program at Dominican University in June 2019.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce Catskill Lit: Words & Music Revivala generative writing retreat.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) started his production company, Alan W. King Productions, which specializes in audio, video, literary services, marketing and content management. For authors, his services include book trailerssocial media banner designs to help promote your book, and media outreach for reviews. Alan marketed his second book, Point Blank, which was named among the “Ten Best Poetry Books for 2016” by Beltway Poetry Journal. It was also listed among “The Best Poetry Books of the New Year 2017” by Washington Independent Review of Books and was reviewed in publications such as the Washington City Paper and the Best American Poetry blog. Learn more here.

Kristin Leonard (Fiction, S’18) received the 2019 Maine Literary Award for Drama.

Jeanette Lynes‘ (Poetry/Fiction, S’05) second novel, The Small Things that End the World, won the Muslims for Peace and Justice Fiction Award at the 2019 Saskatchewan Book Awards, Canada.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash-fiction piece, “A Miracle Shy of Martyrdom,” is forthcoming in Necessary Fiction. John is currently in residency as a Teaching Apprentice at Stonecoast.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) is organizing the first annual Fall Writerfest at the Pyramid Life Center in Paradox, NY, Sunday, September 22nd, through Friday September 27th, 2019. Fee is $300 inclusive of lodging, all meals, workshops, and seminars. Stonecoaster Clif Travers (Popular Fiction, S’17) will be teaching fiction, Ellie will be teaching a multi-genre workshop, and there will also be workshops in poetry and CNF along with seminars on publishing, Tai Chi, writing through grief, and more to be added.

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W’18) is thrilled to have been recently awarded a 2019 Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council and plans to use the grant to spend more time writing. She’s also deeply proud to have her story “Sour Milk Girls,” which was previously selected to be in The Best Science Fiction of the Year, Vol. 4, also selected to be in The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2019. Finally, her 2018 short story “The Grays of Cestus V,” originally in Asimov’s, is now available free to the masses through its inclusion in the short story podcast Tales from A Black Universe—links here (Spotify) and here (Apple).

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S ’08), will lead a one-day workshop, “Dialogue and Scene for Prose Writers,” with Cedar Ridge Writers Series, in Bedminster, NJ, on Saturday, July 20th. Details here.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) invites writers of all stripes who are looking for a good editor to contact her. For the last five years she has worked as a developmental editor on a number of wonderful books that have been published by the University of California Press, focusing mostly on race and gender studies. She’s also edited half a dozen creative nonfiction books, a couple YA novels, and poetry. Authors she’s worked with include Michael Kimmel, Khaled Beydoun, Deepak Singh, Julie Bettie, Barbara Owen, and Robert Wyrod. She works on a generous sliding scale, and is especially interested in working with artists who are isolated socially or geographically, and with intellectuals whose work centers on social justice. She is happy to work with clients for just an hour or two, or for a year, or on an as-needed basis. Please contact her at tamieparkersong@gmail.com.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) won a $500 Merit Scholarship to attend Tinker Mountain Writers Workshop held recently at Hollins University. The award was based on an excerpt from a novel in progress.

 

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Community News & Updates May 2018

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Thank you to all who supported the One Month, One Voice campaign to benefit Stonecoast’s new Writing for Social Justice Scholarship. Together, we raised over $20,000! If you missed the campaign but would still like to be part of the movement, you can email stonecoastcommunity@maine.edu for information on donating or hosting an event. Thank you for being part of Stonecoast’s commitment to social justice.

Acclaimed Irish Fiction Writer Claire Keegan will be presenting a four-day Fiction Workshop in Winter Harbor, Maine, September 13-16, 2018!  Please contact Kathryn Balteff (current Fiction student) at info@FeatheredInk.org or Kathryn.balteff@maine.edu for details and registration information. Registration must be completed by June 1st. There are a limited number of spots available for this wonderful opportunity—don’t wait!

ALUM NEWS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) natural history memoir, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating (Algonquin Books, 2010), has been adapted for stage in Switzerland. Produced by the theater company FRADS Fruhstuck auf der Szene Buchholzstrasse, the performance involves one actor and one dancer. A video trailer for the production can be viewed here. Performances dates are April 25th, 27th, and 28th at the Theater Tuchlaube in Aarau, Switzerland, and May 26th at the Kelelrteater in Bremgarten, Switzerland. More information is available here.

Set photo: The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) published his short story “The Witnesses” in the spring 2018 issue of The Superstition Review. His short story “The Dream” has been accepted for an upcoming issue of EPOCH magazine.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) has accepted a position as the audio producer for PodCastle, a weekly podcast that publishes fantastical short fiction.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is chuffed her 200-word flash “Cadaver Feet” will be reprinted in The Binge Watching Cure II: Horror anthology. This short was written for alumna Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art & Words show and art created for it can be viewed here. Karen is super excited that she will be participating in this year’s Art & Words show and artwork will be created for her Rhysling award-nominated poem “Syncing Minefields.” She’s honored her novel Swift For The Sun won a silver medal in the LGBT category of the IBPA Benjamin Franklin Award. Her article about what to consider while selling your fiction to podcast markets, “One Story, Told Well,” is available for reading on Writespace. Karen will be presenting on panels at Writespace Houston, May 4-5: “The Good, the Bad, and the Slushy: How to Save Your Story from the Slush Pile Neverland,” “Submission Tools for New Writers,” “The Future of LGBTQ Publishing: New Stories, New Voices,” and “Metal and Speculative Fiction.” At the end of the month, May 25-27, Karen will be presenting on two panels at Comicpalooza Houston—“Speculative Poetry Deathmatch” and “Finding Writing Inspiration”—as well as participating in “Poetry of the Imagination: A Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Reading” at Kaboom Books. She was interviewed on KHOI radio’s community bookshelf (April 17) about her work and the effects of divorce and dating on her writing. Her short story about divorce, “From Now Until Infinity” published in Factor Four Magazine, has been receiving a lot of buzz and was reviewed by Maria Haskins in “10 extra excellent stories I read in March.” Karen can be heard narrating work by Llewellyn, Schow, Cushing, Barker, and Gifune on Cemetery Pod. Stonecoast continues to be the single most influential experience on Karen’s career and she is grateful for it every day!

On May 13 the collaborative sound art project Soundtrack becomes available for download. This is a work presented by the Queens Museum as part of the Mel Chin: All Over the Place exhibit with project curator Jace Clayton (aka DJ /rupture), which will include Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11 ) reading from her novel Elysium.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has a play premiering soon! A Canticle of Light will run May 30th-June 2nd in Toronto, produced by indie theatre company Missed Metaphor Productions.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) now has her first-ever writer’s website lindabuckmaster.com. It includes her live blog “Field Notes,” her current “Audio Essays,” and all kinds of other great stuff. She’s also nailed the date for the launch of her hybrid memoir, Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, for November 4 at Waterfall Arts in Belfast, Maine. If you’re in the neighborhood, stop by.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has written about the intersection of race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, “When Martin Luther King Died, Major League Baseball Struck Out,” was an April feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His YA book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight Between Hitler and America, will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in Spring 2019.

Hank Garfield‘s (Fiction, S’04) short-short story “The Pickup Artist” appears in the May issue of Portland Magazine. Hank also has a nonfiction piece, “An Old Boat Gets a New Waterline,” in the May issue of Points East, a boating magazine covering the entire New England coast.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) was the featured guest on WPFW 89.3 FM’s On The Margin with E. Ethelbert Miller. He discussed his latest book, Point Blank, talked fatherhood, and more. Listen to the recording here.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11)—Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire will be released on May 8th for PC/Mac/Linux! The game is fully voiced and features the cast of Critical Role, a popular D&D podcast where talented gaming industry voice actors play a tabletop adventure together. All of the actors play prominent roles in Deadfire. Enjoy the trailer below for some of the action, and enjoy the writing on May 8th!

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) latest collection Acres of Perhaps, featuring his work from Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and Nightmare Magazine plus several new stories, is now available from Amazon or your favorite online independent bookseller. If you enjoy alternate history crime, cursed toys, sky-gazing psychopaths, or creepy 60s TV shows, it may be just what you need for your nightstand.

Jeanette Lynes’ (Poetry/Fiction, ‘05) second novel, The Small Things That End The World, will appear in May 2018, published by Coteau Books, Regina, Canada. Jeanette is currently a Visiting Fellow at the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH).

Both of Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short mysteries, “The New Score” (Fish Out of Water Anthology, Wildside Press 4/17) and “The Drive By” (Busted! Arresting Stories from the Beat Anthology, LevelBest Books 4/17), have been nominated for Derringer Awards by the members of the Short Mystery Fiction Society. Winners will be announced on May 15th. Her short horror story “Kamikaze Iguanas” will appear in the MWA anthology for middle-grade readers entitled Scream and Scream Again (HarperCollins, 2018), edited by R. L. Stine, which is now available for pre-order.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece “Chrysalis” is featured in Melanie Faith’s In a Flash! Writing & Publishing Dynamic Flash Prose, available now through Vine Leaves Press. Nelson’s work appears alongside other Stonecoast alumni in this collection.

“Unseen Canyon,” Jenny O’Connell‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) essay about rafting the Grand Canyon with blind students, will appear in the summer edition of Camas, released this month. A second essay based on Finding Petronella, Jenny’s book project tracing her solo trek across Finland in the footsteps of Lappish legend Petronella van der Moer, is forthcoming from Slice Magazine in September.

American Dangerous, Renée Olander‘s (Poetry, W’05) first full-length collection of poems, will be published by Backlash Press in September 2018. She also has poetry and prose forthcoming in the anthology Feminine Rising, edited by Andrea Fekete and Lara Lillibridge, due in early 2019.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) third poetry chapbook, Alley of Dreams, has been published by Clare Songbirds Publishing of Auburn, NY.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short film The Bakebook was selected by Female Eye Film Festival to screen in a curated exhibition at De Montfort University on April 13, 2018, in association with the Cinema and Television History (CATH) centre. Her short story “Forty Whacks” has also been published in Vague Visages.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) has two ekphrastic poems that recently appeared in The Ekphrastic Review (April 10, based on a painting by Oldilon Redon; April 17, based on a painting by George Bellows). His poem “Aubade” will appear in Tahoma Literary Review in August.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) proudly announces the May 1 publication of Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss (University of Nevada Press). She’d like to express her gratitude and appreciation to all of her Stonecoast faculty and mentors, workshop leaders, and fellow students/alumni for the help and support!

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Angry Kings” appeared in the recent issue of Beneath Ceaseless Skies. 

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) has an essay in About Place Journal: “A Humbling Place” appears in the new ‘Rewilding’ issue.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) is co-editing a teen-idols anthology with Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) to be released June 15th from McFarland Publishers. Idol Talk will include work by Ann Hood, B. A. Shapiro, Susan Straight, Jill McCorkle, Lesléa Newman, Stephanie Powell Watts, and a host of others. The collection showcases a variety of female authors who share—most for the very first time—their teenage crush and the impact the experience had on their lives. Idol Talk will be the first book of teen-idol essays ever written entirely by female writers. Its focus is a topic that’s rarely discussed and seldom studied: the coming-of-age bridge in which girls intensely project themselves into a world beyond themselves. Both co-editors will be at Stonecoast in July to share excerpts and discuss writing about pop culture along with Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction).

STUDENT NEWS

Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction) has been offered a three book deal by California Coldblood Books, an imprint of Rare Bird Books, for a trilogy she has been working on for the past five years. She is over the moon for this wonderful opportunity, and she is so happy to be part of the CCB family.

FACULTY NEWS

Tom Coash’s (Playwriting) short play Quit Stalling will be produced in May as part of the 1:One Festival in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Shortly thereafter, the short film The R Word (for which he wrote the screenplay) will premiere at the White River Indie Festival, June 3, in White River Junction, VT.

Ted Deppe (Poetry) and Annie Deppe will be reading at the Linen Hall Library in Belfast, Northern Ireland, at 1:00 p.m. on 18 May. Ted will give a poetry masterclass/workshop from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon before the reading. As of this writing, there are still a few spots left for the workshop.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) 2005 Nebula-winning novella, Burn, has just had its first ebook edition. Particle Books, a new electronic imprint from Tachyon Publications, launched Burn on April 24; it includes a new afterword by Jim. He talks about the writing of the book as well as his forthcoming short-story collection The Promise of Space in an interview with Paul Semel. In other reprint news, Jim is the only author from the U.S. included in the just-published anthology Future Fiction: New Dimensions in International Science Fiction, edited by Bill Campbell and Francesco Verso, from Rosarium Publishing. Also represented in the table of contents are India, Greece, Zimbabwe, China, Italy, the Canada, the U.K., Russia, Mexico, Nigeria, and Cuba. Jim’s novelette “Bernardo’s House” was first published in 2003.

 

 

 

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