Tag Archives: Kevin St. Jarre

Community News & Updates May 2021

CURRENT STUDENTS

Shannon Bowring‘s (Fiction, Third Semester) flash story “Avian Elegies” has been selected for publication in Best Small Fictions 2021. The story originally appeared in Waterwheel Review in December 2020.

FACULTY  

JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) new novel, Nazaré, will be published on September 14, 2021, by PM Press. The novel, inspired by the Arab Spring, is a magical realist fable about an uprising against a dictator.

Expanding on her research for her recent novel Landslide (Knopf, February 2021), Susan Conley’s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) feature story on Maine’s teetering commercial fishing industry appeared in the May issues of Downeast Magazine. Entitled “Catching Fish is the Easy Part,” the feature will go from the print edition to online in later May. Susan’s interview about testing new novel ideas for leaks and writing the rough draft of her novel Landslide in a fever-dream is entitled “Fever-Dream First Drafts,” and it appeared in the most recent Stonecoast MFA newsletter. 

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction) wrote a feature for ESPN’s The Undefeated: John Wright Had the Talent, but Couldn’t Follow Jackie Robinson to the Dodgers. He’s also at work on a young-adult book about Frank Serpico, the New York City cop who famously exposed systemic corruption in the NYPD.

On May 10th and May 17th, Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) is teaching an online class via the legendary Politics & Prose Bookstore: Plot: The Four Letter Word that Strikes Fear in Most Writers. Join in the fun as we explore plot, one of the most slippery and angst-inducing idioms for writers of fiction, popular fiction, and non-fiction.

Robert V.S. Redick’s (Popular Fiction) novelette “Vanishing Point” sold to Clarkesworld and will be published in May. His new novel, Sidewinders, an epic fantasy and the sequel to Master Assassins, will be published on July 6th by Talos Press.

ALUMS

Kirkus provided laudatory reviews of L.C. Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) first and second novels of her Jack Harper Trilogy, Pivot and Perish. You can access the reviews here and here.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) is a finalist for both the Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine and the Ignyte Award for Best Fiction Podcast for his work as the audio producer of the fantasy fiction podcast PodCastle, alongside co-editors C.L. Clark and Jen R. Albert, assistant editor/host Setsu Uzumé, and all of PodCastle‘s fabulous associate editors. Peter also narrated Josh Rountree’s story “Rewind” for the March 30 episode of PodCastle. You can listen to it here.

Streetlight Magazine published J Brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) review of Susan Conley’s audiobook of LandslideAudiofile Magazine published J’s review of a new audiobook production of Gabriel García Márquez’ Strange Pilgrims. And Tiny Seed Journal published J’s poem “Burlapped Bushes” in their Hibernation Issue.

Linda Buckmaster‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) hybrid piece, “Outbreak,” was published in the Maine Arts Journal Spring issue. An excerpt from her story collection, “Short Shorts,” will be appearing in the anthology North by Northeast 2 to be published by Littoral Books in June. She just finished a short stint as a poetry columnist at the local newspaper Republican Journal, and she was pleased to be part of several Zoom readings of poetry and prose this winter.

Darcy Casey‘s (Fiction, W’19) flash fiction piece “Bird Day,” was recently published in Newfound.

Lauren M. Davis’ (Poetry, S’15) poem “This Thing That God Made” will be released in Heart of Flesh Literary Journal in May 2021. 

Terri Glass‘s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) will be reading from her new book of poetry, Being Animal,for Poetry Flash, Sunday, May 16th, at 3:00 p.m. PST. These poems celebrate, grieve the loss, and reflect on the wisdom of many animals from the bee to the mountain lion. Register in advance for this reading here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Clifford Royal Johns’ (Popular Fiction, W’18) new novel Velocity Blues has been reviewed in Publishers Weekly and Kirkus.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) has an essay, “Collector of Passports,” out on the Sad Girls Club Literary Blog on May 10th, and the same essay will be featured on their newly launched podcast, Sad Girls Club Literary Podcast, on May 8th. Her reported piece “Adapting Untold Holocasut Stories for Young Readers” was recently published in Tablet Magazine. She also has an essay accepted by Hippocampus for their anthology Ink, coming out this year, and another essay (an excerpt from her memoir in progress) accepted for the “The Aunt Flo Project,” an upcoming anthology of poetry, short stories, and creative non-fiction about all aspects of menstruation. Finally, she will be reading a piece about her conversion (to Judaism)-journey on Tablet Magazine‘s Unorthodox podcast on May 13th. 

John Christopher Nelson (Fiction, S’15) and Jordan Robson have created a new literary endeavor, con(text) quarterly, with the help of Brady Thomas Kamphenkel (Poetry, S’15). They are accepting submissions for their first issue, with the theme of “Endings,” from May 1st through August 31st at con(text) quarterly.

Carolyn O’Doherty (Popular Fiction, W’11) is happy to announce that Reckless, the final book in her YA Rewind trilogy, will be out May 15th. Reckless concludes the story of Alexandra Manning, a spinner with the ability to freeze and rewind time. Details at www.carolynodoherty.com

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) served as researcher and editor of Volume XXII of Chebacco, the annual journal from the Mount Desert Island Historical Society, which features the logbooks of a group of student naturalists known as the Champlain Society. Their notes from summers spent wandering mountains and waters of Mount Desert Island in the 1880s also contain the origins of the idea to conserve for the public the place that became Acadia National Park. The logbooks also form the foundation for Catherine’s next book.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) has a poem appearing in Apple Valley Review and a poem forthcoming in Paterson Literary Review

Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce that she won the 2020 Terrain Editors’ Prize for Nonfiction for her essay “The Fifth Direction.” The essay, and more information about the prize, can be found here.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) new novel Celestine will be published on May 12, 2021, by Encircle Publications. It’ll be in your favorite local bookstore and available online, and can be pre-ordered now. It comes in hardcover, paperback (ISBN 978-1645991601), and e-book/Kindle.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) debut memoir, The Angle of Flickering Light, was released on April 6th. Signed copies are available for delivery or pick up via A Freethinker’s Corner in Dover, NH. Copies are also available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, or your local independent bookstore via Bookshop.org. Gina and fellow Stonecoaster Susan Casey (Fiction, W’10) have two events coming up on April 28th and May 4th. On April 28th, from 8:30-9:30 p.m. EST, Arlyn Miller of Poetic License Press is hosting their reading and conversation about Writing and Publishing Memoir. More information and Zoom link can be found here. On May 4th at 7:00 p.m. EST, The Bookery in Manchester, NH will be hosting a virtual Reading and Discussion between Gina and Susan. Zoom Registration link is here. They would love it if you tuned in for one or both of these events!:)

Ashley K. Warren’s (Fiction, S’12) short story “The Caretaker” was published in Issue 2 of FeverDream Magazine, a publication featuring artists from across the state of Montana.  

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates January 2021

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Stonecoast MFA 2021 Winter Residency

Join the Stonecoast MFA 2021 winter residency January 7-17th, 2021 for a week of inspiring readings and discussions! Evening events are free and open to the public and will be hosted online through Zoom. View the schedule and register here.

Stonecoast Tidings

If you’d like to receive Stonecoast’s quarterly newsletter featuring faculty interviews, alumni writing, and opportunities to rejoin residencies and engage with Stonecoast literary events, you can sign up for Stonecoast Tidings by updating your USM alumni profile.

The Stone House Readers’ Series

The Stone House Readers’ Series is a regular series for alumni, faculty, staff, and current students to share their writing live on Facebook. Readers are scheduled in advance and are asked to bring 15 minutes of material to share, whether it’s a work in progress, a published piece, or anything in between. This is a program run by Troy Myers and Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) to give members of our community a casual and consistent opportunity to connect. Join us Sundays in January! 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Shannon Bowring‘s (Fiction, Thirdsemester) essay “Fresh Cut” was recently selected as the winner of the Just Write Maine-related Nonfiction Award for the Joy of the Pen writing contest. In addition, her short experimental piece “Avian Elegies ” was published in Issue #4 of Waterwheel Review.

Natalie Harris-Spencer‘s (Fiction, Third semester) short essay “Expat Guilt,” which details the isolation of living an ocean apart from your family during a pandemic, appears in the British publication Dissonance Magazine

FACULTY

Faith Adiele’s (Creative Nonfiction) new Calm sleep story, narrated by acclaimed actor Idris Elba, was released on December 1, which was #GivingTuesday. For every listen of “Kingdom of the Sky,” Calm will donate $1 (and up to $100k) to support RED’s fight against AIDS and COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. 

Doom Eternal: The Ancient Gods – Part One by id Software saw instructor Tobias S. Buckell (Popular Fiction) in the credits under Writing and also in Story Development, his first foray into writing in-game content for a major platform game. Tobias also edited and had a story in the anthology Reclaim, Restore, Return: Futurist Tales from the Caribbean, published for the 2020 Bocas Lit Fest in Trinidad. Other short stories appeared in editor John Joseph Adams Dystopia Triptych, Escape Pod: The Science Fiction Anthology, and Slate Magazine. He just turned in his latest novel, A Stranger in the Citadel, to Audible Originals, which will be out in May 2021.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote a feature for The New York TimesHow New York City Vaccinated 6 Million People in Less Than a Month. He’s also at work on a young-adult book about Frank Serpico, the New York City cop who famously exposed systemic corruption in the NYPD.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) short story “My Darling Socialist” was chosen as a finalist in the Saints and Sinners Festival fiction contest for 2020-21. It will be published in the Festival’s 2021 anthology, forthcoming from Bold Strokes Books.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) The Book of Lamps and Banners received a rave review from Locus Magazine, and was named one of the year’s top 5 crime novels by Crime Reads/LitHub, one of the year’s top 10 thrillers by Crime Fiction Lover, and made LitReactor’s list of the year’s best novels. It was also noted in Fine Books Magazine in their roundup of best books about books. The audiobook was named one of the year’s best audiobooks by both Slate and AudioFile Magazine. Elizabeth was featured on the podcast 99% Invisible, talking about novelizations. Her recent reviews include Christopher Golden’s novel Red Hands and J.R.R. Tolkien’s Letters from Father Christmas, both for The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting, Writing for Social Change) will lead a virtual Playwriting Workshop called ACT ONE for the Charlotte Writer’s Club North, based in Charlotte NC, on February 27, 2021. Her personal essay “Covid Class of 2020” was published in NOW, a new online literary journal from the wonderful Hobart Festival of Women Writers, co-founded by Breena Clarke.

ALUMS

The film short The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, adapted by Elisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) from her memoir of the same title, screened in December at the Academy-accredited Leuven International Short Film Festival in Belgium. In March, the film screens at the Academy-accredited Tampere Film Festival in Finland. That month the film will also be part of Discover Film Awards in London.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) is thrilled to announce the appearance of her story “An Embrace of Poisonous Intent” in the anthology Bitter Distillations: An Anthology of Poisonous Tales, published by Egaeus Press. This hardcover edition is limited to 340 copies. December also came with news that her linked vignettes created for a shared world were published in The Lost Citadel Roleplaying Game, which opens with a story by Elizabeth Hand.

Ryan Brod (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) has an essay coming out in the next issue of The Maine Review (Issue 7.1)He’s excited to start another semester teaching creative nonfiction at the University of New England.

J Brooke (Poetry, S’19) had “Nowhere to be Found is Atonement,” a poem about Yom Kippur during the pandemic, published by Detour Ahead Literary Magazine. J has enjoyed a number of essay publications in 2020, yet rarely has poems accepted for publication. Not complaining, though—merely commenting.

Terri Glass‘s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) poem “Unexpected Visitor” will be published in San Diego Poetry Annual 2021, and her poem “Amid all this Light” will appear in Issue 13 of Young Raven’s Literary Review. She will be reading on January 30 from her new book of poetry, Being Animal, via Zoom for the Watershed Festival, an environmental poetry festival based out of Berkeley, CA. Check her website, terriglass.com, for the link and time.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) engaged in a wide-ranging conversation with blogger Dr. Deborah Adamy on December 14. They discussed Hovey’s memoir, She Said God Blessed Us: A Life Marked by Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Church, in the larger context of truth telling in this tumultuous year. 

Nina Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) had an essay published in Kveller that starts like this: “A few years ago, my then 19-year old son called me from Norway via FaceTime to ‘share some news.’ Benya was spending a gap year in my native country. He was anxious about our conversation, an unease that was obvious to me—the mama bear back in the States—as soon as I saw his sweet punim on the screen. // ‘Mama, I’ve been meaning to talk to you about some things…’ he began.”

Nylah Lyman (Poetry, S’10) has signed a contract with Encircle Publications. They will publish her poetry collection in September 2021.

Catharine H Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be opening Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life to a fourth cohort this month. This five-week live online series will meet Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. EDT starting January 26, 2021. To register or for more information, go to catharinehmurray.com (the direct link).

On January 8th, Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be moderating The Journey You Must Take, a conversation between debut authors Maggie Downs and Katherine E. Standefer, hosted by PRINT Bookstore and Portland’s Mechanics Hall. In Braver Than You Think, Maggie backpacks around the world to visit countries her mother—struck with early-onset Alzheimer’s—cannot make it to herself. In Katherine’s book Lightning Flowers, she travels to mines across Africa and the American West trying to understand whether her potentially-lifesaving implanted cardiac defibrillator might have caused loss of life along its supply chain. The dialogue will be enhanced by Jenny’s own 2014 solo trek across Finland (the subject of her current book project and Stonecoast thesis) following the footsteps of a female legend into the heart of the Arctic Circle. Guaranteed to be rich and vulnerable, this conversation will travel from what it takes to move from knowing you need to do something to actually doing it, to the financing of such journeys, to the craft challenges of telling personal stories that unfold in foreign contexts, to the unexpected things that happen along the trail, to the way grief can change along a journey. Register for the (free) event here.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) will be one of the featured poets reading for (Un)Cloistered Poetry on Sunday, January 10, at 6:00 p.m. Email EllieOLeary@gmail.com for the Zoom link.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has contracted her latest novel, Aventurine, to Encircle Publications, with an expected publication date of January 2022. This will be Anne’s fifth published novel. She joins Stonecoaster Kevin St. Jarre as an Encircle author.

Meghan Vigeant‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) essay “The Shame Files” is about the contents of a plain, brown file labeled “Sexual Assault 2010.” It appears in the Stonecoast Review, issue 14, winter 2021. 

Adrienne S. Wallner’s (Poetry, W’09) debut poetry collection To the 4a.m. Light is now available for preorder from Finishing Line Press. For every book ordered before January 30, 2021, buyers will receive a one-of-a-kind bookmark, each with a unique line of poetry from To the 4 a.m. Light handwritten by the author. Bookmarks will be mailed after January 30, unless arrangements are made by contacting the author. All books will be shipped on the official release date of March 26, 2021. To order, go here. Read Adrienne’s blog at www.inkinthebranches.com. Find Adrienne on IG & FB @inkinthebranches. Click here to sign up for Adrienne’s newsletter.

An essay by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) appears in the 2020 anthology Friends: Voices on the Gift of Companionship, published by Jack Walker Press. “Dear Anne” was inspired by a 25-year correspondence that began in childhood.

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates December 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

STONECOAST ALUMNI WINTER 2021 SCRIPTWRITING WORKSHOP:
THE NEXT STEP–REHEARSING YOUR SCRIPT!

As part of Stonecoast’s offerings at our January 2021 Virtual MFA Residency, alums are invited to sign up for “The Rehearsal Experience” with Stonecoast MFA faculty member and playwright Tom Coash and guest playwright-director Jeni Mahoney—a 3-day workshop with access to the entire winter residency. More information can be found here.  

A huge part of scriptwriting is learning to collaborate and glean valuable information about your script during the rehearsal process. Being in a room with really smart, talented people, all working together, readying your script for the public is an incredibly inspiring, unique experience. Scriptwriters, in this special, four-session, alumni workshop, will submit a ten-minute play/screenplay and during the course of the workshop will read, discuss, rewrite, and REHEARSE these pieces for an online, post-residency Stonecoast public reading. Taking advantage of the online residency possibilities, we will bring in professional, guest artist actors and directors from all over the country to rehearse each play individually in online breakout rooms. Writers will have one-on-one sessions with their directors, rehearsals with actors/directors, discussion of scripts with workshop members, and opportunities to observe other rehearsals. Come join us and see your script brought to life by some of the best talent in the country. All levels of scriptwriting experience welcome.

This workshop is also open to writers who have not attended Stonecoast. So, please tell your friends. Space is limited, sign up asap!

Workshop Dates: January 7th (one-hour introduction meeting) through January 10th, though participants will have access to the entire residency (January 7-17)
Workshop Time: 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Cost: $1100, or $880 early bird discount for those who sign up before December 11th. A deposit will be required. 
Email Tom Coash for additional information. Email Lindsey Vazquez for questions and registration and to enroll. Space is limited! 

STONECOAST MFA ALUMNI READING SERIES

Join us for the first annual Stonecoast MFA Alumni Reading Series! Over the course of two sessions (December 2nd & December 9th), we’ll hear readings from twelve alumni authors who published a book in 2020. Additional information & RSVP:

Stonecoast MFA 2020 Alumni Reading Part I (December 2nd) featuring Kevin St. Jarre, Cynthia Kraak, Julia McKenzie Munemo, Ellie O’Leary, Anne Britting Oleson, and David Sloan

Stonecoast MFA 2020 Alumni Reading Part II  (December 9th) featuring Brenda Cooper, Terri Glass, Gail Hovey, Ellen Meeropol, Colin W. Sargent, and Joanna Solfrian

CURRENT STUDENTS

Darcie Abbene‘s (Fiction) essay “Go On, Then” was featured as an Editor’s Selection by Emma Bolden in Tupelo Quarterly’s Issue 22. In addition, Darcie’s review of Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis was recently published in Necessary Fiction.

FACULTY

Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) writes about meeting and getting naked with long-lost Finnish family in “A Family Project” in The Best Women’s Travel Writing, Volume 12: True Stories from Around the World, edited by Lavinia Spalding and illustrated by Colette Hannahan.  

JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) new novel, Nazaré, will be published by PM Press in Fall 2021. The novel tells the story of a peasants’ revolt, led by a homeless boy and a washerwoman, to topple a dictator.

Martín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new book of poems, called Floaters, is forthcoming in January from W.W. Norton. The book is now available for pre-order.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote his latest piece on civil rights for ESPN’s The Undefeated: Bloody Police Assault on Miles Davis Feels Like it Could Have Happened YesterdayHis next book will be for young adults and is slated for release next year. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA. 

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) review of Lynne Sharon Schwartz’s story collection Truthtelling appeared in The New York Journal of Books.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) forthcoming collection, The Best of Elizabeth Hand, received a starred review from Publisher’s Weekly, which called it “a superior collection [of] prose that elevates genre tropes to transcendent levels.  Readers will be blown away.” Her novel The Book of Lamps and Banners made BookPage’s Top 10 list for the year’s best crime & suspense fiction, and received more rave reviews from Crime Reads, Crime Fiction Lover, and The Portland Press Herald. She was recently profiled at LitHub, and her review of Lisa Robinson’s rock and roll memoir, Nobody Ever Asked Me About the Girls, just ran in The Washington Post.

This month Cara Hoffman (Fiction, Popular Fiction) signed a two-book contract with PM Press for a collection of essays and a collection of short stories; she will also be featured in their Outspoken Author series. Her most recent children’s novel, The Ballad of Tubs Marshfield (Harper Collins), was named an Indie Next pick; she was recently interviewed in Grist about the book. Her essay “The Evolution of Everyday Life” about the scientist and philosopher Peter Kropotkin will appear in LitHub in mid-December.

ALUMS

Jillian Abbott (Popular Fiction, S’04) been invited to present a paper on the Curating the Self panel and moderate another panel at the Teaching Life Writing Conference, an international virtual conference on nonfiction and pedagogy at the University of Alberta, Canada, December 10-11, 2020. She’ll moderate the panel RT1 Life Writing Beyond the Undergraduate Literary Classroom at 8:00 a.m. MST on December 10, 2020.

Laurie Lico Albanese (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) has sold her novel Hester to Sarah Cantin at St. Martin’s in a two-book pre-empt deal. Hester, set in Salem 1829, is the retelling of Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter told from the “real” Hester’s POV. Laurie started the novel while she was a student at Stonecoast working with mentor Susan Conley

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) published a ghost story written in her last workshop with Liz Hand. That story, “Gaze with Undimmed Eyes and the World Drops Dead,” was published in the anthology Terror at ‘5280, which recently won Best Anthology at the 2020 Best Book Awards (BBA) by American Book Fest. She also made an appearance at MileHiCon 52 as a speaker on the panels “Building SF & Fantasy Mythologies” and “Modern Age of Poetry.”

Wingless Dreamer, a publisher of books of poetry, published “Sticks” by J Brooke (Poetry, S’19) in their recent volume entitled Sunkissed. While J has had a string of published essays since graduating, “Sticks” marks the first poem that has been published.

Renee S. DeCamillis’s (Popular Fiction, W’14) short story “Bad Trip Highway” appears in the new horror anthology Wicked Women, which was published by NEHW Press in November and features all women authors and artists from New England. 

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) interviewed former Stonecoast faculty member James Patrick Kelly for Barnstorm, the University of New Hampshire’s official literary journal. You can read Jim’s thoughts on writing during the pandemic, how stories turn into movies, contemporary Chinese science fiction and other topics under this fall semester’s segment of “The Writer’s Hot Seat,” available online.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) is pleased to announce that she was interviewed on Books Q&As with Deborah Kalb on October 31.

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) has committed cozy with his mystery short story, “Death in the Lower Forty,” which is in the newly released anthology, Cozy Villages of Death.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) has a new video inspired by his poem “Gluttony.” The poem is from his forthcoming chapbook from Plan B Press.

40 Thieves on Saipan, written by Joseph Tachovsky and Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10), was awarded Winner in the Military History category of the American Book Fest competition.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’12) is delighted to share that she has signed with Bison Books, the trade imprint of the University of Nebraska Press, for publication of her memoir Uphill Both Ways: Hiking Toward Happiness on the Colorado Trail.

Nina Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) recently had a flash essay published in Moment Magazine. She’s also pleased to finally see published the result of ten years’ work, The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 9: Catastrophe and Rebirth, where she was on the advisory board and did much of the research that resulted in the inclusion of literature and culture by Jews from Arab lands, often excluded from Anglophone, Ashkenaz-centric publications. (The dude standing on his head looks like Picasso, but it’s Ben Gurion, the first prime minister of Israel).

Julia McKenzie Munemo (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) spoke to Dani Shapiro for the Family Secrets podcast about the secret at the center of her memoir The Book Keeper: A Memoir of Race, Love, and Legacy.

J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes’s (Poetry, W ’11) latest poetry collection, was that you Boss?,has been accepted for publication by Wipf and Stock Publishers in 2021. The collection consists of psalm poems addressed to an unspecified higher power, and they rely heavily on an intimate language drawn from experiences of nature and life on a farm. The collection is dedicated, in part, to Maurice Manning, whose collection Bucolics had no little influence on the author.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) announces her first picture book, Gordy and the Ghost Crab, published by Writer’s Coffee Bar Press. Linda wrote and illustrated the text herself and created her own book trailer. The PreK-age 8 book also includes fun facts about crabs and a conservation message. Teacher’s guide available. The book is available on Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and bookstores nationwide. 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates November 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Stonecoast Alumni Scriptwriting Workshop: The Next Step – Rehearsing your Script! – Winter 2021!!

Instructors: Tom Coash (Scriptwriting/Playwright) and Jeni Mahoney (Scriptwriting/Artistic Director of the Seven Devils New Play Foundry)

A huge part of scriptwriting is learning to collaborate and glean valuable information about your script during the rehearsal process. Being in a room with really smart, talented people, all working together, readying your script for the public is an incredibly inspiring, unique experience. Scriptwriters, in this special, four-session, alumni workshop, will submit a ten-minute play/screenplay and during the course of the workshop will read, discuss, rewrite, and REHEARSE these pieces for an online, post-residency Stonecoast public reading. Taking advantage of the online residency possibilities, we will bring in professional, guest artist actors and directors from all over the country to rehearse each play individually in online breakout rooms. Writers will have one-on-one sessions with their directors, rehearsals with actors/directors, discussion of scripts with workshop members, and opportunities to observe other rehearsals. Come join us and see your script brought to life by some of the best talent in the country. All levels of scriptwriting experience welcome.

This workshop is also open to writers who have not attended Stonecoast. So, please tell your friends. Space is limited, sign up asap! Contact Tom Coash (thomascoash@sbcglobal.net) or the Stonecoast office for more information: stonecoastmfa@maine.edu or 207-780-4423.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Natalie Harris-Spencer‘s (Fiction) short story “Phrenology,” which she shared in David Anthony Durham’s “Grim Tidings” workshop last residency, will be published in the next issue of The Dark City Crime & Mystery Magazine.

FACULTY

Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) wrote two episodes in the new HBO Max mini-documentary series A World of Calm, which premiered on October 1st and is designed for relaxation. Her episodes are #8 “Horses,” narrated by Kate Winslet, and #10 “Water,” narrated by Mahershala Ali. The trailer is available here. Faith also has an essay in the anthology Alone Together: Love, Grief & Comfort in the Time of COVID; sales go to benefit indie bookstores.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) was awarded an individual fellowship from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. 

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) new novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, continues to receive rave reviews, including from The New York Times Book Review, which wrote, “Cass Neary is a remarkable heroine. As with Sherlock Holmes, her power lies in the act of seeing what ordinary people cannot, only where Holmes brings clues to light, Neary is content to linger in the dark. Her eye catches the liminal spaces between clarity and shadow so well I found myself rereading passages for the beauty of her way of seeing.” Oprah Magazine named Liz’s 2015 novel Wylding Hall one of the 29 greatest gothic novels of all time. In October, she taught at the NYC Writer’s Hotel virtual writer’s conference, and led an online workshop on supernatural fiction at Clarion West.  

Scriptwriting Instructor Jeni Mahoney, the Producing Artistic Director of Seven Devils Playwrights Conference, was featured in a recent American Theatre Magazine article celebrating the 20th anniversary of the program, which she founded in 2001. Since 2001, Seven Devils has supported the development of more than 220 plays, including Veils by Scriptwriting Faculty member Tom Coash, who now serves on the Seven Devils Board of Directors.

ALUMS

Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) short story “Dr. Catalyst,” which she workshopped while at Stonecoast with Liz Hand and fellow students, was turned into a 55-minute production by No Sleep Podcast. Her short story is featured in Season 15, Episode 5, and begins around the one hour, thirty-eight minute mark.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’16) has a piece of humorous horror titled “The Stages of Monster Grief: A Guide for Middle-Aged Vampires” in the anthology Coffin Blossoms, which was published by Jolly Horror Press in October 2020. She also appeared on the panels Building SF&F Mythologies and Modern Age of Poetry at MileHiCon 52. 

J Brooke (Poetry, S’19) won Honorable Mention in Streetlight Magazine’s 2020 Essay/Memoir contest. A review of the essay “Finding Barbie’s Shoes” said, “J Brooke’s ‘Finding Barbie’s Shoes,’ an elliptical narration of how something as small as the foot of a Barbie doll can lead to consideration of topics larger and more painful. There is humor in this account, but also that edge of reality we all have to contend with. Its two poles inform each other.” The essay can be read here.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has stories in The Quilliad and Nightmare this month. She is also pleased to announce the one-year anniversary of the ephemera reading series. Join readers Kate Heartfield, Fonda Lee, and Vivian Li, and performer Kari Maaren, on November 18 at 7:00 p.m. EST.

teri elam (Poetry, S’19) had two poems published in Limp Wrist magazine: “On Writing A Fan Letter To Lynda Carter Circa 1975” and “On Being Called The N-Word In Atlanta, 2016: A Southern Ghazal.” Her ghazal has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. teri will also have two essays, “Memory as Dance: The Darktown Strutters’ Ball” and “In Praise of Greenwood,” included in the exhibition catalog for the upcoming Greenwood Art Project. This project will commemorate the centennial anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre and the historic Black Wall Street.

Colleen Hennessy‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’20) essay “Motherhood in Irish Nonfiction: Abortion and Agency” appeared in the fall issue of Assay: Journal of Nonfiction Studies. The research and analysis arose from her third semester paper and graduation seminar at Stonecoast. 

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) annually writes a Christmas novella; On One Condition is available on the kindle app.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) is thrilled to announce that her short story “The Quilt” was published last month in Willows Wept Review. The story is about climate change, fracking, and the enduring nature of love, with a bit of magic realism and ancient mythology thrown in. Bonus points if you can determine what mythological figures and events it’s inspired by.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) recently had an essay in Past Ten, a literary project exploring the transformative power of time and the human condition to turn the unpredictable into art, by asking contributors, “Where were you ten years ago on this date?” She also had an essay out in The Forward, the country’s oldest Jewish newspaper (founded in 1897) about her recent reckoning with her misguided use of the Yiddish word schwartze, when she was a 23-year old convert to Judaism.

Nylah Lyman‘s (Poetry, S’10) poem “Noah’s Wife” has been accepted by Stonecoast Review for publication January 2021.

Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be opening her live online memoir classes to a new cohort this month. Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life is open for enrollment. This five-week live online course begins Thursday, November 12, from 12:00-1:30 p.m. EDT. Memoir: Craft and Application also will be open to new students starting this month with Thursday or Saturday classes, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EDT. To apply or for more information, visit www.catharinehmurray.com or email her at writingwithcatharine@gmail.com

First Light,” Jenny O’Connell‘s(Creative Nonfiction, S’17) essay about finding home in the wild waters of Maine, appears in the November issue of Decor Maine. Her opera libretto on advocacy and domestic violence during quarantine, “The Sky Where You Are,” was produced by An Opera Theatre of Minneapolis and premiered worldwide last month as part of the Decameron Opera Coalition’s “Tales from a Safe Distance.” Tickets are available through the end of the year. 

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) has a new story titled “Lady of the Slake” in Upon a Once Time, a color print anthology of reimagined fairy-tale mash-ups published by Air and Nothingness Press. Suri’s story is an interpretation of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Wild Swans” combined with the Arthurian literary cycle. 

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has poems in two anthologies released in October: “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgments” appears in Show Us Your Papers from Main Street Rag Publishing, and “Le Rire ” appears in its original French alongside his English translation in The Very Edge Poems from Flying Ketchup Press.

J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) was made Canon Poet of Grace Episcopal Cathedral, Charleston, South Carolina, on October 11th, 2020.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) short story “Chuligani,” published in Solstice Literary Magazine, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Kevin’s novel Aliens, Drywall, and a Unicycle will launch virtually at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 10. Hosted by Longfellow Books of Portland, Maine, and Encircle Publications, Kevin will be joined in conversation by author Bill Roorbach. To register in advance for this meeting please use this link. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’06) is currently writing a series of weekly essays: “2020: Life in the Time of Pandemic.” Her blog site is Kathleensullivan.substack.com. The essays are the process notes of a poet, a psychotherapist, a grandmother, three quarters of a century old as she makes sense of this extraordinary moment in history.

Morgan Talty’s (Fiction, W’19) short story “The Name Means Thunder,” which originally appeared in the Fall 2019 issue of The Georgia Review, was selected as a Distinguished Story for The Best American Short Stories 2020

The Learned Pig published Darlene Taylor‘s (Fiction, W’17) “Haunting Stones” essay as a Root Mapping feature. The essay can be read in the online journal here. Also, Darlene won a D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities Fellowship; she plans to complete the work noted in “Haunting Stones” as part of the fellowship. Separately, as part of her continued service to the arts community, Darlene has been named an Advisory Board member of The Clifton House located in Maryland. The Clifton House honors creative work and the legacy of Lucille Clifton in the Baltimore home where she lived with her family and wrote poetry.

Meghan Vigeant‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) flash non-fiction story “Don’t Live Past Ninety, Dear” appeared on Multiplicity‘s blog in October. 

Stonecoast fiction alum (W’19) sidney woods was honored that “Monsoon” was recently published in Brilliant Flash Fiction (under pen name sid sibo).  

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates August 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon is taking place online from Thursday, August 6, to Saturday August 8. Stonecoast alumna Bridget Eileen (Poetry, S’09) returns as artistic director of the event for the fourth year running. With the this year’s virtual format, even more Stonecoasters will be taking part: former faculty Kazim Ali, Richard Hoffman, and Dennis Nurkse, along with alums Amy Alvarez, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Jessica de Koninck, Vanesa Pacheco, and Christine Tierney.

The event also includes Lloyd Schwartz, Danielle Legros George, Dorothea Lasky, and Eileen Myles, among many notable participants. Friday night will be a special look back on the history of the Boston Poetry Marathon and include a tribute to the late Kevin Killian from Lee Ann Brown and Tony Torn. The organizing team includes Bridget Eileen; the other artistic director, Suzanne Mercury; and two new organizers, Xtina Strong and Christina Liu.

In total, close to 150 poets will be reading their work during the three-day event. More information can be found here.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Darcie Abbene’s (Fiction) craft essay “Zen and the Art of Prickly Writing” is online at Parhelion Literary Magazine.

Natalie Harris-Spencer‘s (Fiction) creative nonfiction essay that she read at the Stonecoast Winter Residency open mic has been published in The Satirist. “The Great British Guide to Dining Out in America” is written by a Brit who moved to the U.S. two years ago and has been figuring out how to eat successfully here ever since.

 

FACULTY

JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) essay “Black and Blue: The Uses of Anger” and his poem “Six Epitaphs for the Jazz Man” were published in July in the literary/arts journal The Bored Friday Project: Volume Five. His short story “Nazaré” will appear in the literary magazine A Public Space in the fall.

Tom Coash (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts, Writing for Social Change) was recently elected to the Seven Devils New Play Foundry’s Board of Directors. New Stonecoast Scriptwriting instructor Jeni Mahoney is featured in this excellent American Theater magazine article about Seven Devils, one of the best new play development groups in the world.

Susan Conley’s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) latest novel, Landslide, will be published by Knopf on February 2, 2021.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) forthcoming novel The Book of Lamps and Banners received a starred review from Kirkus, saying, “Cass Neary is a tough, self-destructive character who still exudes compassion, courage, and love for the beauty and the pain of life—even more so because she recognizes its impermanence. Part Club Dumas, part The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, all punk attitude and beautiful ache.” Recent reviews include Ursula Hegi’s The Patron Saint of Pregnant Girls for The Washington Post.

Katherine Larson (Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) has been awarded the 2020-2021 Sowell Collection Fellowship. Offered in conjunction with colleagues in the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Libraries, the purpose of this award is to foster creative work and expression in the spirit of Texas Tech’s Sowell Family Collection in Literature, Community and the Natural World. Writing with a profound respect for the grandeur of the land, Sowell Collection writers are deeply engaged with questions of land use and the nature of community, the conjunction of scientific and spiritual values, and the fragility of wilderness.

Diane Seuss (Poetry) has been named a 2020 Guggenheim Fellow. Her fifth book of poems, frank: sonnetswill be published by Graywolf Press in March 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

ALUMS

Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) second novel of the Jack Harper Trilogy—Perish—will be published this October 13, 2020 by California Coldblood Books, an imprint of Rare Bird Books.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Prashanth Srivatsa’s story “Seven Dreams of a Valley” for the July 2 episode of Beneath Ceaseless Skies. You can listen to it here.

On July 27th, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “After Robert Fuller” was the featured poem for the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-A-Day email. Cheryl’s latest book, Mama Phife Represents, is forthcoming from Haymarket Books in 2021.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has a story in Lightspeed this month entitled “The Bone-Stag Walks.” She is also a finalist for the Aurora Award for her work co-chairing the ephemera reading series; the Auroras will be streamed live at 7:00 pm ET on August 15th.

Darcy Casey (Fiction, W’19) has two recent publications: her flash CNF “My Sister and Other Big Things” was a finalist to the Big Sky, Small Prose Flash Contest and is published in issue 92 of CutBank. She also has a flash fiction piece, “Portrait of a Young Woman During Quarantine,” in the June 2020 issue of Brilliant Flash Fiction.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) is chairing his very first conference panel on nonbinary gender in science fiction at next year’s NeMLA. The conference takes place in Philadelphia, March 2021, and is currently planned to be a hybrid (meaning presenters can join remotely via Zoom or in-person), and he encourages any current Stonecoast students or alumni interested in academic scholarship in the area of Gender and Women’s Studies to submit a proposal by September 30th.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has three articles in the 2021 Harris Farmer’s Almanac, now in the magazine section of your favorite drugstore, grocery store, or bookstore.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has been writing for Peril on Gorgon, a noir mystery set in the Outer Worlds that will be available on September 9th. His next project is Avowed, a new game in the Pillars of Eternity setting that will one day be available on Xbox and Windows 10.

Linda Morrow’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) book Heart of This Family: Lessons in Down Syndrome and Love will be available for pre-order/purchase in August 2020. The book description:

1966, the Beatles and Leave It To Beaver reign, the Vietnam War and Civil Rights rage, feminism is unheard of, and Linda’s first baby is diagnosed with Down syndrome. Determined to raise Steve at home, along with his two younger brothers, Linda tries to fulfill cultural norms as a homemaker, a woman whose voice is seldom heard or valued. But it isn’t in her nature to be meek.

Linda struggles to provide Steve an education at a time when disability rights don’t exist. Her advocacy focuses first on integrating him into the community, then, as he grows into adulthood, landing a real job and independent living.

Over these same decades, Linda learns to advocate for herself as well, starting with a career in public school education. When she unexpectedly falls in love with a woman, her life path takes unforeseen turns. Linda must dig deep to accept her new identity before she is read to meet her true solvate. Throughout, unwavering love for all her sons is her lodestar.

“The Fifth Direction,” an essay (and photos!) by Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) appears in the July issue of Terrain.org and can be found here. It is about commercial fishing in Bristol Bay, Alaska—and it troubles the waters.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) short story “Chuligani” has been accepted for the summer issue of Solstice Literary Magazine, due out in August 2020.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, S’04) hosted two successful literary Zoom events featuring Irish writers in July. The first was with Alan McMonagle, author of the new novel Laura Cassidy’s Walk of Fame (Picador). The second event took place on July 21 and was part of the Virtual Irish Arts Expo, sponsored by the Irish Heritage Society of Milford, and it featured both Lisa and Irish writer Geraldine Mills, whose new verse memoir, Bone Road, was a focus. Lisa’s review of this collection was just published in Live Encounters, an online Irish review site. Additionally, Lisa has a new poem forthcoming in Bacopa Literary Review; it will be included in a collection to be published in late 2021. The biggest news of all is an offer on Lisa and her husband’s longtime home in Connecticut and a pending move to Mancos, Colorado, a tiny mountain town in the Four Corners area. Lisa and her husband will be heading to Colorado in early September to join their daughter and son-in-law in this gorgeous area near Mesa Verde National Park. They will be in a temporary space until November when the renters of their house will move out. Internet may be erratic during this transition time.

Eugenio Volpe (Fiction, W’05) was interviewed in The Massachusetts Review as a contributor to their summer issue.

Adrienne S. Wallner (Poetry, W’09) has signed a publishing contract with Finishing Line Press for her first poetry collection, To the 4 a.m. Light.  Several poems in her book were created and honed during her time at Stonecoast.  Adrienne’s work can be found here.

Lindsey Wells‘ (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) article “Spokane’s Riverfront Pavilion” was published in the July issue of Parks and Recreation Magazine.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates July 2020

FACULTY

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote his latest piece on sports and civil rights for The Nation: “When the KKK Played Against an All-Black Baseball Team.” His next book will be for young adults and is slated for release in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana Is Here received a Bronze Medal in the 2019 Foreword Reviews Indie Book Awards!

Elizabeth Hand’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Curious Toys is a finalist for both the Locus and Shirley Jackson Awards. The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel (due in September), has received great advance trade reviews, including a starred review from Booklist.  Hand recently wrote about John Garth’s The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places that Inspired Middle-earth for The Washington Post.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Faithful Sister” was published in Daily Science Fiction on June 17.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is one of six writers who formed the group Writers Against Racial Injustice to raise funds for The Equal Justice Initiative. The group started with a goal of raising 10K and have wound up raising over 50K, with help from many supporters including Stonecoasters and coverage in The Boston Globe, Shelf Awareness, and a feature article on June 24 in Publishers Weekly. The fundraiser is running through July 4th; donations are welcome here.

The publication date for Robert V.S. Redick’s (Popular Fiction) new epic fantasy novel, Sidewinders (sequel to Master Assassins), has just been announced: it will be on the shelves on May 4, 2021, from Talos Press.

 

ALUMS

One of Jillian Abbott’s (Popular Fiction, S’04) students, Hastride Eduoard, was profiled for the animation project she submitted for her final project in Jillian’s ENG 384 RC Writing for Electronic Media class (Hastride’s video is at the end of the article).

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) is thrilled to announce that her short story “A Seed Planted” has been translated in Japanese for Night Land Quarterly Vol. 21 “The Fantasy of Sky Realms.” This short story was originally included in the anthology Hath No Fury, edited by Melanie R. Meadors. She also has a reprint of her flash piece “The Landscape of Lacrimation” included in the Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES, edited by Julie C. Day. Both of these stories were originally drafted during her time at Stonecoast.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been long-listed for the Sunburst Award for her story “When the White Bird Sings,” published last year in Augur. In addition, the ephemera Reading Series is a finalist for the Aurora Award, under Best Fan Organizational.

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) will have a story, “The Keeper of the Marsh,” published in the July issue of The Scarlet Leaf Review.

Libby Cudmore (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) has sold her second story, “A Brief History of Local Warfare,” to Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine. Her first, “All Shook Down,” is scheduled for publication in the September/October issue of EQMM.

teri elam’s (Poetry, S’19) personal essay “On Asking Mama To Pray for Me” will be included in the forthcoming anthology, Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort During the Time of COVID-19 which is raising money for indie bookstores. Stonecoast professor Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) is a contributor as well.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) new book of poems, Being Animal (published by Aldrich Press), is now available for purchase through kelsaybooks.com and Amazon. These poems observe and embody a vast array of animals from the honeybee to the mountain lion in poems that celebrate their beauty, grieve their loss, and reflect on their wisdom. For a signed copy, please visit www.terriglass.com. Derrick Jensen, author of A Language Older than Words and Endgame, says, “A love for wild nature suffuses this beautiful collection. Poetry can serve no more important purpose than to rekindle our love of those who are wild.”

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) has had poems published or accepted for publication in Main Street Rag, Clementine Unbound, Green Hills Lantern, and Arcturus. She has also launched a website with co-editor Pit Pinegar dedicated to providing writing exercises for those who need them. The exercises were contributed by writers who teach. Anyone who has published work and teaches and is interested in contributing an exercise can contact her at barbarapgreenbaum@gmail.com for more details.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) is happy to announce that her memoir, She Said God Blessed Us: A Life Marked by Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Church, will be published by Exposit in August. Many people at Stonecoast helped in the writing of this book. Here’s what fellow alum Elliot Long (Creative Nonfiction, S’10), now with the Emmett Till Interpretive Center, has to say about the memoir: “In She Said God Blessed Us, Gail Hovey introduces us to a firebrand who confronts her world with a fierceness and determination to fight for change. As she participates in several of the pivotal social justice movements of our times, from the fight against American racism in the 1960s to the campaign to end South African apartheid in the decades that followed, Hovey grows to recognize how abuse of power also shaped her young life—abuse at the hands of her religious mentor. Wrenching and celebratory, Hovey’s memoir depicts a long struggle to move through guilt and pain toward a peace she can claim as her own.” For more information and to order an advance copy, please visit Gail’s website.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has won the Neosho Arts Council’s short story contest for her story “December 1, 1969.” Judge Kevin Dilmore said, “A relatable protagonist and a suspenseful construction make this story a compelling read from the beginning. Backstory is introduced at a great pace just when readers will benefit the most from it. This is an enjoyable and thought-provoking read, and images from this will stay with readers for a long time.”

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created four new poetry videos. The videos for “Beacon” and “Into the Light,” inspired by the poems of the same names, go into Alan and his wife’s battle with lupus, Alan doing a kidney swap to help his wife, and their surgeries. “Heartbreak is Unavoidable” is inspired by Alan’s poem “This Good”; and “A Poem for My New Born and George Floyd” is inspired by Alan’s new poem “The Land of Innocence,” which he wrote for his one-month-old daughter and George Floyd. You can watch the videos here.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) is especially happy to have an essay, “Saying Goodbye to Seafood,” published in Tablet Magazine, where her writing has been rejected several times in the past. This reminded her to never give up and to submit, submit, submit.

Julia Munemo (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) and Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be hosted by World Fellowship Center for a virtual reading and conversation about Writing from a Family Legacy on Monday, July 6, 7:00-8:00 p,m. Julia will read from her debut memoir The Book Keeper and Ellen from her new novel Her Sister’s Tattoo. Details and link here.

An excerpt from Julia McKenzie Munemo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) memoir The Book Keeper appeared on Public Seminar in June.

dg nanouk okpik’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “If Oil Is Drilled in Bristol Bay” was featured in the Poetry Foundation’s Poem of the Day email on June 5, 2020.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) will have her poem “That Poetry Thing” in the Summer 2020 issue of Ibbetson Street Magazine.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “La Ride,” written in French, will appear with his English translation in the forthcoming anthology from Flying Ketchup Press. His poem “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgements” is forthcoming in Main Street Rag’s anthology Show Us Your Papers. And his poem  “My Grandfather’s Sky” will appear in North Scene Poetry Press’s anthology of poetry about 9/11.

The prose poem “Mountain” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) will appear in the Fall/Winter issue of New South.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that as of today he is the Assistant Principal at Hinsdale Middle High School in Hinsdale, New Hampshire. In writing news, his essay “Hattery: The Many Roles of a First-Time Teacher” was accepted into Voices of Practice to be published later in 2020.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) has signed a new book deal for his novel Celestine with Encircle Publications. It’s expected to be in bookstores in May 2021.

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a short story titled “The Sea of Stars” in the new anthology Retellings of the Inland Seas from Candlemark and Gleam, edited by Athena Andreadis; and, an essay titled “Ghosts, Grimoires, and Dealing with Demons: Hellblazer’s Real-World Magic” in the new book From Bayou to Abyss: Examining John Constantine, Hellblazer from Sequart, edited by Lou Tambone and Rich Handley.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates April 2020

Hope everyone is staying safe!

CURRENT STUDENTS

Natalie Harris-Spencer’s (Fiction) short story “Labor Day Weekend” will be published on April 21st in Volume 2 of Allegory Ridge‘s fiction anthology, Archipelago. Allegory Ridge is a magazine for open-minded millennials that publishes travel writing, short stories, poetry, artwork, photography, and personal essays.

FACULTY

The German edition of JJ Amaworo Wilson‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) novel Damnificados, translated by Connie Lösch, was published by Editions Nautilus on March 2nd. The book was positively reviewed in Der Spiegel, Europe’s largest weekly news magazine, the same week.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana Is Here is nominated as a 2019 Indie Book of the Year (LGBTQ fiction) from Foreward Reviews!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) will be leading a free online workshop focused on building resilience through writing for teens, sponsored by the Clarion West Writers Workshop; Stonecoast faculty member emeritus James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction) and current Stonecoast faculty member Tobias Buckell (Popular Fiction) are also instructors.  Recent reviews include N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became and Megan Campisi’s Sin Eater, both for The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) published “Soundstage Musicals: Capturing Theater on Film” in the March 2020 issue of Imagine, the print and online magazine for the New England film community. Her article addresses the filming and streaming of musicals as one way to keep theater alive in these dark times.

ALUMS

Check out Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) current online radio and podcast interviews regarding her book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating. In addition to a lot of quirky snail science, the book relates to the pandemic experience, as it includes reflections on isolation and illness. Recent interviews include the following links: interviewed by Indira Naidoo for ABC Nightlife Radio in Sydney, Australia, and interviewed by Emily Kwong for NPR Science Podcast Short Wave.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Amit Gupta’s story “How Did It Feel to Be Eaten?” for the March 12th episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here. He also hosted the March 24th episode of PodCastle, featuring Sofia Samatar’s retelling of “The Tale of Mahliya and Mauhub and the White-Footed Gazelle,” available here.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) has a Snow White retelling coming out in the anthology Arterial Bloom, edited by Mercedes M. Yardley. “Rotten” was the story she submitted with her application to Stonecoast, so she’s happy that is has finally found a home at Crystal Lake Publishing.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce that her novella The Rampant (Aqueduct Press) is a nominated finalist for the 2019 Lambda Literary Award in Science Fiction, Fantasy, and HorrorPublishers Weekly says, “Equal parts playful and heartbreaking, this apocalyptic novella offers one-of-a-kind answers about the end of the world….This clever and surprisingly fun take on the rapture is the perfect theological horror story.” The novella is available in both paperback and as an ebook.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18), PhD candidate in Literature, has been awarded a summer research grant from the University of New Hampshire to continue his work on the erasure of women in science fiction. He is excited to write an article on feminism related to Jesuit philosophy and the universe of Warhammer 40k as his entry point into the world of academic publishing.

 

David A. Hewitt’s (Popular Fiction, S’09) novelette The Great Wall of America, published by Mithila Press, is now available in both Kindle and paperback editions, and his short story “Donald Q. Haute, Gentleman Inquisitator, and the Peril of the Pythogator” will be appearing in the April 2020 issue of Metaphorosis.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is happy to announce that her second full-length poetry collection has been selected as a semifinalist in Tupelo Press’s 2020 Dorset Prize.

Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short story “Harlem in Havana” will be released April 7, 2020, in the anthology The Beat of Black Wings: Crime Fiction Inspired by the Songs of Joni Mitchell, edited by Josh Pachter, published by Untreed Reads. Alison will appear with fellow anthology authors Alan Orloff and Elaine Viets for a panel and signing on April 18th at Murder on the Beach Bookstore in Delray Beach, 6:00 p.m.

What a moment to launch a new novel! Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) is delighted that her fourth novel, Her Sister’s Tattoo, will be published on April 7th. She is working hard to convert her book tour to virtual events—live-streamed readings and Zoom book parties and curated series like A Mighty Blaze and Reading with Robin. Links to Internet events will be posted on her website as they’re set. Interesting times, no?

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) creative nonfiction piece, “Things You Gave Me When You Left” is forthcoming in The Real Story. John will have a solo author event—barring further quarantine—at Paper Boat Booksellers in West Seattle on the evening of May 1st.

dg nanouk okpik’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “When White Hawks Come” was published in the Academy of American Poets’ Poem-a-Day email on March 30, 2020 (the link also includes an audio recording of the poem).

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that his short story “Soovien Hungered in the City of Spiders” is out at StarShipSofa. It’s a story about poetry-driven spider gladiatorial matches, and other stuff.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) had a streak of publication right before everything changed: an article on wood construction and the future of Maine forests in Northern Woodlands magazine, a “Plant Love Story” about salt marsh grass, an essay on the striped skunk for Natural Resources Council of Maine, and an update on wild Atlantic salmon for The Working Waterfront. Her book, The President’s Salmon, was featured in several new podcasts and cited by Mark Kurlansky in his new book on salmon. And a lyric essay has been accepted by Waterwheel Review.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) recently participated in a six-author online showcase, hosted and broadcast via Zoom by publisher Encircle Publications. His novel Aliens, Drywall, and a Unicycle is now available for pre-order here.

Eugenio Volpe (Fiction, W’05) has an essay coming out in the summer issue of Massachusetts Review entitled “Jesus Kicks His Oedipus Complex.”

“Steve’s Ashes,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Summer 2020 issue of Evening Street Review, a journal of Evening Street Press of Sacramento.

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates February 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Alumnus Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W’07) has undergone heart surgery in January and some Stonecoasters are among those supporting a GoFundMe effort right now to help with expenses. If you’d like to donate, visit Jacob’s Big Dumb Heart.

BOSKONE 2020

This year’s Boskone—New England’s longest running science fiction convention—features many Stonecoast faculty and alumni on the program participant list, including: KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16), Julie C Day (Popular Fiction, S’12), David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction faculty), Theodora Goss (Popular Fiction faculty), James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction, Playwriting faculty), Mur Lafferty (Popular Fiction, W’14), Robert V. S. Redick (Popular Fiction faculty), Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W’18), and (of course!) Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09). Word is that many other Stonecoasters will be in attendance as well. Feel free to join us! Boskone – February 14th to 11th at the Westin Waterfront Hotel, Boston.

FACULTY

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) interviewed novelist Garth Greenwell about his new novel Cleanness for Electric Literature.

In 2021, New Rivers Press will publish Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) next poetry collection, Gratitude with Dogs Under Stars: New & Collected Poems. Her poems have recently been included in three anthologies: “Come November” in Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy, edited by Elizabeth Dodd, Simmons Buntin, and Derek Sheffield (Trinity University Press, 2020); “Dylan’s Lost Years” in Stone Gathering: A Reader 1.1 (Summer 2019); and “How Bad News Comes” in Send My Roots Rain: 52 Weeks of Poetry to Heal Your Grief, edited by Kim Langley (Paraklete Press, 2019). She published an essay, “The Unhappy Hour,” in Ascent Magazine in November 2019. Debra received a small grant ($4000) from Iowa Arts Council to complete a Poet-Laureate-in-the-Schools initiative in the 2019-2020 school year, and she was interviewed by Frontier Poetry in May 2019. In addition to writing, Debra did quite a lot of speaking:

Cate Marvin (Poetry) received the 2020 Maine Artist Fellowship Award in Literature (in this case, poetry) from the Maine Arts Commission.

More recent-vintage Stonecoasters might remember the collaboration seminar Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) and painter pal Susan Tilton Pecora gave at a winter residency a few years back on a book project to benefit their neighbor, Blue Star Equiculture. The draft horse rescue will be closing in a few months due to a lack of donations and volunteers so Suzanne and Susan have turned their work into a series of notecards (each featuring painting and essay) to more quickly help pay final bills at the 11-year-old draft horse rescue. The set of ten blank notecards, priced at $25, includes five different signed images and essays from throughout the rescue’s history. Checks should be made out to Susan Tilton Pecora and sent to her at PO Box 195, Thorndike, MA, 01079; pay via PayPal at sess7@comcast.net. All donations are tax-deductible and will be acknowledged by Blue Star Equiculture, a registered nonprofit. Please note on checks or on PayPal payment how many sets of cards you’d like. The horses and their humans, including these two longtime friends and neighbors of Blue Star, thank you.

ALUMS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) joined a full voice cast to narrate Kyle Kirrin’s story “Yo, Rapunzel!” for the January 28th episode of PodCastle. You can listen to it here.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is pleased to announce a new story, “Nightmare Spinner,” in Way of the Laser: Future Crime Stories, edited by Eric Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) and Joe McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) (Vernacular Books) and two reprints: “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow,” in Weird Dream Society, edited by Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12), Chip Houser, and Steve Toase (The Post-Apocalyptic Writers Society); and “Cadaver Feet,” in The Binge-Watching Cure II: An Anthology of Horror Stories, edited by Bill Adler, Jr., and Sarah Doebereiner (Claren Books, October 2019).

Sunspot Literary Journal chose the opening to one of J Brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) essays, “Before and After,” as finalist for their Inception Contest (voted one of 2019’s Best Writing Contests by Reedsy) and published eir essay in the most recent issue. Of possible interest is J worked on this piece second semester at Stonecoast and received editorial suggestions from Stonecoast Director Justin Tussing on it, which e incorporated.

Susan Casey’s (Fiction, W’10) book Rock On: Mining for Joy in the Deep River of Sibling Grief is being released on February 14, 2020. The book launch is at the Frontier Café on February 15th from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Links to register here and here.

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’ 14) will be reading from her horror/psychological thriller novella The Bone Cutters on Saturday, February 22nd, from 2:00-3:30 p.m. at the Lewiston Public Library. The event is free to the public and will conclude with book sales and signing. Renee is also thrilled to announce that she has signed a comic book deal with Phi3 Comics. She has been commissioned to write the book #4 finale, “Gateway of Destruction,” for the current Spiralmind storyline of “Muses’ Rise.” Publication date is TBD.

teri elam’s (Poetry, S’19) poem “High School Dancerettes at Half-Time” was published in the Winter 2019 issue of Prairie Schooner. teri’s poem “Butterflies” (a reflection on the criminalization of school-age black girls) was chosen as part of 2020’s Visible Poetry Project and will be brought to the screen by filmmaker Christina Sloan Stoddard.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S ’11) is delighted to announce that her memoir, worked on at Stonecoast and beyond, will be published this fall by Exposit/McFarland. The title for this story of the long reach of childhood sexual abuse by a seminary-trained woman is still being worked on, as the publisher says it’s a hard book to title. Watch this space.

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be conducting a writing workshop on writing in first person on February 15th at 2:30 p.m. at the Capricon science fiction convention (February 13-16, 2020). He will also be a panelist at the convention on the following panels:

  • Detectives in the Wild – Thursday, 5:00 p.m.
  • Nonfiction for Fiction Writers – Friday, 10:00 a.m.
  • Lessons I Learned as a First-Time Novelist – Friday, 8:30 p.m.
  • How Not to Kill Yourself over a Deadline – Saturday, 5:30 p.m.
  • A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Publisher – Saturday, 8:30 p.m.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) sold a mini-mystery, “Who’s That Valentine?”, to Woman’s World magazine, which is in the issue that hits your grocery/drugstore checkout lines on February 6th.

Rebecca Kightlinger (Fiction, W ’14) announces that a new, enhanced edition of Megge of Bury Down: Book One of the Bury Down Chronicles will be released by Rowan Moon on February 1, 2020, in advance of publication of Book Two of the series this summer. The book’s epigraph is from a poem by Annie Finch.

Fiona Lehn (Popular Fiction W’15) has a new speculative novel, Transformation Junkies, published by Wicked Publishing. Click here to read more about the project, and here to view the book trailer.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold the short story “Wind Gets Her Own Place” to Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10)’s film (co-written with director Doug C. Williams) Being is now available on DVD and Blu-Ray nationwide, exclusively at Wal-Mart (with more big box stores and streaming to follow). The film starts Ben Browder (Farscape, Stargate SG-1), Lance Henriksen (Aliens, Millennium), Ahd Kamel (Collateral), Robert Burke (BlacKkKlansman), Jason Iannacone (The Irishman), and James St. Vincent (The Price). The trailer can be viewed here.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) is pleased to be a featured presenter at AWP in San Antonio. She will read from her forthcoming novel Her Sister’s Tattoo and talk with Donna Hemans, Aimee Liu, and Kristen Young, about themes of families torn apart by history and war. Ellen’s recent New England ARC tour was featured in Shelf Awareness on January 10.

On February 22nd from 10:30 to 12:30, Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be at the Belfast Free Library teaching Memoir 101 through the Maine Writers and Publishers’ Alliance. The workshop is free to MWPA members and $5 for non-members.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) will have her fourth novel, Cow Palace, published by B Ink Publishing in March of this year. She is also gratified to have had her fourth poetry chapbook, Magic Somewhere Else, contracted by Clare Songbirds Publishing, to appear at the end of the summer.

Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) was invited to the Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, for a residency in writing. There, nested in the Great Smoky Mountains, she worked on a long essay she is composing about commercial fishing in Bristol Bay, what that experience gives her to understand about gendered violence, and how we might alchemize it into something transformative and new.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) has signed a new book deal for his novel Aliens, Drywall, and a Unicycle with Encircle Publications, with a publication date of November 6, 2020.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Where You Linger” appears in the January/February issue of Uncanny Magazine and is available to read free online later this month.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates November 2015

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W’12) short story “The Last Laugh” will appear in the November issue of Strangelet Journal.

Strange-HorizonsKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited to share her very first professional narration—“The Wives of Azhar” by Roshani Chokshi—which she recorded for Strange Horizons Magazine.  Also, the first issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring Stonecoast alums Bonnie Stufflebeam (fiction) and Adam Gallardo (nonfiction) and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

apb-anthoJennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has a flash fiction story “Innocent Bysanders” in APB: Artists Against Police Brutality, an anthology published by Rosarium Publishing that confronts the many persistent problems plaguing the American criminal justice system. All proceeds generated from this project will be donated to The Innocence Project.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Thirteen Tuesdays of Saint Anthony” is now available online in Farrago’s Wainscot Issue 16. It feels like the perfect match. Julie truly hopes the two will be blissfully happy, though considering the story’s subject matter, perhaps not. In more happy news, her story “The Faces Between Us” was republished in audio form as part of Podcastle 386. Finally, Julie’s story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the print and e-anthology Gaia: Shadow and Breath Vol. 2. 

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay, “Rochambeau and the Mystery of Racetrack Playa” will be coming out in Young Ravens Literary Review November 23. Her poem “Just Another Day” will be published in an anthology, Earth Blessings, Spring 2016. And her poem “The Pond People” is forthcoming in The San Diego Poetry Annual, Spring 2016. Terri’s new website is up and running with everything finally under one roof. Peruse the poetry, prose and send her a note.

Terri-Glass-Banner-Sample

IMG_0296Kristin LaTour‘s (Poetry, S’07) first full-length collection, What Will Keep Us Alive, is available for pre-order from Sundress Publications. Luis Alberto Urrea, author of The Hummingbird’s Daughter, says, “Kristin LaTour’s American song flies from the heartland full of sun, shadow, full winds and explosions of lightning all along its highways. Wonderful and alive.” And Lesléa Newman, author of I Carry My Mother and October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard, wrote, “The poems in What Will Keep Us Alive are told in a strong, authoritative voice that made me sit up and listen. ‘Break me like a stained cup.’ ‘Let the sparkle fall from your fingers.’ ‘Light a match and wander west.’ I will do as these poems command willingly and eagerly, for Kristin LaTour is a poet who has something to say and isn’t afraid to say it. Fierce, funny, fearless, and finely crafted, these are fabulous poems I will read, ponder, and share with friends, colleagues, and students again and again and again.” Free shipping with pre-orders.

51gFPhEYytL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_Jeanette Lynes (Poetry/Fiction, ’05) released her seventh book of poetry—Bedlam Cowslip: The John Clare Poems (Wolsak & Wynn’s Buckrider Books imprint)—this month. The book was launched with readings in Toronto, Manchester, and London.

On October 22-24, 2015, New Rivers Press will host a release party at three different venues over three days. The events will feature book signing, author readings and interaction, a silent auction, and the selling of their four most recent publications. These include the annual American Fiction: Volume 14 collection, which was edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) and won the 2014 Gold Medal for short fiction from The Midwest Independent Publishers Association; Wrestling with Angels by Daniel Gabriel; Home Studies by Julie Gard; and Flashcards and the Curse of Ambrosia by Tracy Robert. On Thursday, October 22nd, there will be a reading at 8 pm in Minnesota State University’s Comstock Memorial Union, Room 101. On Friday, there will be another reading at the Spirit Room along with hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction. Lastly, on Saturday there will be a 12:00 p.m. reading at the Red River Market.

Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, ’12) has been working with the actor Jeff Daniels on the story of his life and the history of the theater he established in Chelsea, MI. The Purple Rose of Chelsea will be released this month.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), was pleased when her essay which appeared on Brain, Child a few weeks ago, “I Survived Postpartum Depression, But it Never Left Me,” caught the attention of maternal and mental health organizations, sparking conversation about the lingering effects of PPD. Another piece, “The Horsey Set,” appears in a new anthology, Unfinished Chapters. In October, Lisa presented two seminars (one on publishing personal essays, another on working with incomplete memories in memoir) at the NJ Women Who Write conference in Madison, NJ; and she read from her memoir manuscript and appeared on the panel “Death: Italian American Style” at the national Italian American Studies Association conference in Washington D.C. An interview with Lisa appears at Your Blog Connection, about how she uses her blog to help other writers.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) and Nylah Lyman (Poetry, S’10) have been invited to spend a week at La Muse Artists and Writers Retreat in southern France. The retreat is held in a manor house, some parts of which date back to the 12th century, and is about 25 minutes into the mountains near Carcassonne. The website for La Muse is here.

La Muse from the river in the valley..

La Muse from the river in the valley..

ci_harlemrenChristopher Allen Varlack (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) published an edited collection of critical essays on literature of the Harlem Renaissance with Salem Press in October. The book is available from Salem Press and Amazon for purchase.

Anne Witty (Poetry, W’12) has been named the winner of The New Guard Knightville Poetry Contest for her piece “Contact Sheets,” which will be published in The New Guard Vol. V in 2016.

 

FACULTY

Issue10_499x648Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was on the cover of Locus Magazine‘s October issue, featuring an interview about her recent novel Wylding Hall and forthcoming Hard Light. Her recent reviews include Patti Smith’s M Train and William Sloane’s The Rim of Morning for the Washington Post, and Stacy Schiff’s The Witches: Salem 1692 for the Los Angeles Times.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has two poems in the current issue of The Denver Quarterly 50.1 (2015).

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will be doing several events in November: on November 16, she will read at Newtonville books from the new anthology Me, My Hair & I: Twenty Seven Women Untangle an Obsession. The anthology was a “Book of the Week” in People magazine and was on Entertainment Weekly‘s “Must” list. On November 30th, Elizabeth will lead a Celebrity Book Club discussion at Newtonville Books. Also Elizabeth will read from her works as Visiting Author at Bacon Free Public Library in Natick, MA on November 17 at 7PM:

OPPORTUNITIES

Damien Shuck (Poetry, ’09) currently serves as a Peace Corps Volunteer in China, working at Southwest University, on of the top-tier universities in China.  He has several opportunities for Stonecoast students and Alumni.

  1. He is currently working on assembling a series of extensive reading textbooks to be published through his University Press. He is looking for all genres—Fiction, Popular Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, or Essays—and will accept previously published or unpublished work.  Please submit any number of texts to swutextbooksubmission@outlook.com. Submission deadline: December 31st.
  2. An opportunity for any Stonecoast alumni interested in taking a year to teach in China at Southwest University. Teaching here has been a wonderful opportunity. You will have time to work on studying Chinese, to explore another culture and gain experience, and lots of time to work on writing. Southwest University is a great place to work and I am trying to establish close ties with Stonecoast.

If you are interested in either of these opportunities please contact Damien at damienshuck8@msn.com.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates

Community News & Updates September 2015

ALUMNI

Quenton Baker‘s (Poetry, S’12) first chapbook, Diglossic in the Second America, is now available from Punch Press. You can hear him read two of the poems in recent radio segment with Washington State poet laureate Elizabeth Austen.
diglossic

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) has been honored with a 2015-16 fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council to support creation of new work. In addition, Sheila has been granted a two-week residency at the Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities in Southern Pines, NC in December. Just before the fellowship news arrived, Sheila had made the difficult decision to decline an offer for two more books in her mystery series to devote time to nonfiction, and she feels well rewarded. They say “follow the money,” but sometimes you have to follow your heart.

Letters to TiptreeKaren Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Bosley Gravel’s Cavalcade of Terror.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) is very happy to see her creative non-fiction essay “Deception in Six Parts” published in the new collection Letters to Tiptree, celebrating the life of famed science fiction writer James Tiptree Jr. (a.k.a. former military officer Alice B. Sheldon). Four of Sandra’s short stories since her graduation from Stonecoast have received Tiptree Award Honor List mentions.

The Girl in the MirrorConstance McKee (Fiction, W’13) is pleased to announce that on September 3 her debut novel, The Girl in the Mirror, will be released by Deeds Publishing. Special thanks to Suzanne Strempek Shea, Boman Desai, and Ted Deppe for the tutelage that led to the completion of this book.

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction, S’15) had a story published by Guernica Magazine & PEN American simultaneously. PEN says: “The Guernica/PEN Flash Series is a collaborative effort in which both journals publish the best flash out there.”

Robert Ortiz (Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, S’14) is happy to announce his new job as an English Affiliate Instructor at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Love Songs of CarbonJanet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) ironed cloth sculpture Sleep is featured on the cover of U.K. poet Philip Gross’s latest poetry collection Love Songs of Carbon, just released by Bloodaxe Books. Love Songs of Carbon closes with the poem “Thirteen Ways to Fold the Darkness,” which was inspired by Sleep. Sleep is in the collection of the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas, Austin, gift of Laurence Miller, 2015.

“Manhandled,” by Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12), will be published in the September 2015 issue of New Ohio Review. It is an essay about sexual assault in the Alaskan wilderness and is part of her memoir-in-progress.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has been asked to contribute an essay on Bill Gaston’s The Good Body for a critical anthology on Hockey Literature to be edited by noted Canadian writers and scholars, Jamie Dopp and Angie Abdou.

Michaela Roessner (Popular Fiction, S’08) has a short story, “Flattened,” included in Western Weird, this year’s Manifest West anthology. The anthology will be out at the end of August. The art catalog for Viktor Koen’s photomontage bestiary is now published and includes Roessner’s ekphrastic accompaniment, “Mormo,” along with the works of other contributing writers.

PenelopePenelope Anne Schwartz (f/k/a Penelope Schwartz Robinson; Creative Nonfiction, S’04) has recently published two new books of nonfiction: Penelope: Weaving and Unraveling, a Writing and Revising Life, a memoir of her writing life from 1970-2014; and When Lilacs Last, the McLaughlin Garden, an historical biography of Bernard McLaughlin, the “Dean of Maine Gardeners.” Her essay collection Slippery Men was chosen by Katha Pollitt for the Stonecoast Book Prize and published by New Rivers Press in 2009. Schwartz lives in Arcata, California, and teaches in the English Department of the College of the Redwoods in Eureka.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) will be reading with poet Carmen Mandley and current Stonecoast student Elisha Webster Emerson at LFK, 188A State St, Portland, Maine on September 7, 2015. Drinks at 8:00 p.m., readings start at 9:00 p.m.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) horror story—and her first Stonecoast-workshopped story!—“The Devil’s Hands” appeared in the most recent issue of Black Static. Her Little Mermaid retelling “Sisters” appeared in Scheherazade’s Bequest. Her flash fiction “No Eyes” appeared in Psychopomp. And another flash fiction,”Mrs. Stiltskin,” was reprinted in audio version in Podcastle.

Growing a New TailGrowing a New Tail, Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, S’04) debut collection of short fiction, will launch in Ireland in September and in the U.S. in late October. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press. Watch the book trailer here: https://vimeo.com/133364023

Marco Wilkinson‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lyric memoir, Madder, which was his Stonecoast thesis, was a semi-finalist for the Cleveland State University 2015 Essay Collection Prize.

In late June, Anne Witty (Poetry, W’12) “published” a work that could best be described as a 4,400-square-foot three-dimensional book. The occasion was the grand opening of a new permanent exhibition for Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut. Entitled “Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers,” the exhibit looks at the impact of the whaling industry on American history and culture. It features objects, still and moving images, short explanatory texts, excerpts from literature, poetry (including an excerpt from Tony Barnstone’s  “Parable in Praise of Violence”), song, underwater sound, computer interactives, and much more. The project crowns Mystic Seaport’s many years’ work to restore and sail the last remaining American whaleship, the Charles W. Morgan (built in 1841), with an in-depth look at whaling’s continued effects on America. Creating museum exhibits, like creating books, requires many different skills. Anne’s freelance work as Guest Curator included writing, research, guiding object and image selection, and consultation in other areas (including an appearance in the exhibit’s orientation film). Other team members contributed 3-D design, graphics design, computer interactives, song and sound recordings, special expertise on whales and American whaling history, design and construction coordination, and many other pieces of the three-dimensional puzzle. If any Stonecoasters are interested in learning more about script-writing for exhibits and its kinship with screenwriting and other forms of non-fiction and fiction, please get in touch with Anne at witty[at]gwi.net.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has sold the fourth Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, to St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan, with audio rights to the third and fourth novels going to Blackstone Audio. All four books have also been sold in Sweden. Liz’s most recent reviews include Austin Grossman’s Crooked, and Ann and Jeff Vandermeer’s Sisters of the Revolution, both for The Los Angeles Times.

Demons of the HellmouthNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is proud to announce that she has helped Rupert Giles, who served as the Watcher of Vampire Slayer Buffy Summers, take his newest book to publication. Demons of the Hellmouth: A Guide for Slayers (Titan Books) will debut September 29. Giles’s dear friend, the actor Anthony Stewart Head, wrote the introduction.

The latest installment of Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) column in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine “Welcome to Asimov’s” profiles ten new writers who have recently made their first sale to Asimov’s. His oft-reprinted story “Think Like A Dinosaur” has been selected to be translated for a new and as yet unnamed anthology that will introduce contemporary North American science fiction to the readers in Cuba. Jim plans to visit Cuba in the spring of 2016.

duck and cover--2015-with WB & PR bannerMike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover has been nominated for 8 “Desert Star Awards” in Palm Springs, CA, including “Outstanding Production: Comedy.” For those in the northeast, Duck and Cover will open September 4 at The Players’ Ring Theatre (Portsmouth, NH) and run through Sept 20th. Duck and Cover is about a sheltered American family in 1962 suburbia trying to hold on to its innocence in the era of civil rights riots, birth control pills, rock ‘n’ roll, and an unexpected visit from closeted jazz trumpeter Uncle Bunny and his African-American band-mate and partner on the night that the Cuban Missile Crisis begins. Duck and Cover received the 2014 John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award (New England Theatre Conference) and was also awarded “Best Play” at the Northern Writes Festival (Penobscot Theatre Co, Bangor, Maine) and “Audience Favorite” at the Dezart Performs Festival of New Plays (Palm Springs, CA). The Players’ Ring Theatre has intimate, three-quarter-round seating for 70 (general admission), so reservations are encouraged.

Benedict_Hair_pbkflps_comp.inddElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an essay in the new anthology: Me, My Hair and I: Twenty-Seven Women Untangle an Obsession, released in September 2015 from Algonquin Books, edited by Liz Benedict. Elizabeth’s essay—“Act-Tresses: Hair as Performance Art”—has just been published on the online literary magazine, Solstice. Elizabeth will be reading from the anthology with Liz Benedict at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA, on October 5th. For other upcoming readings and events see  http://www.elizabethsearle.net

Leave a comment

Filed under News & Updates