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Community News & Updates January 2021

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Stonecoast MFA 2021 Winter Residency

Join the Stonecoast MFA 2021 winter residency January 7-17th, 2021 for a week of inspiring readings and discussions! Evening events are free and open to the public and will be hosted online through Zoom. View the schedule and register here.

Stonecoast Tidings

If you’d like to receive Stonecoast’s quarterly newsletter featuring faculty interviews, alumni writing, and opportunities to rejoin residencies and engage with Stonecoast literary events, you can sign up for Stonecoast Tidings by updating your USM alumni profile.

The Stone House Readers’ Series

The Stone House Readers’ Series is a regular series for alumni, faculty, staff, and current students to share their writing live on Facebook. Readers are scheduled in advance and are asked to bring 15 minutes of material to share, whether it’s a work in progress, a published piece, or anything in between. This is a program run by Troy Myers and Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) to give members of our community a casual and consistent opportunity to connect. Join us Sundays in January! 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Shannon Bowring‘s (Fiction, Thirdsemester) essay “Fresh Cut” was recently selected as the winner of the Just Write Maine-related Nonfiction Award for the Joy of the Pen writing contest. In addition, her short experimental piece “Avian Elegies ” was published in Issue #4 of Waterwheel Review.

Natalie Harris-Spencer‘s (Fiction, Third semester) short essay “Expat Guilt,” which details the isolation of living an ocean apart from your family during a pandemic, appears in the British publication Dissonance Magazine

FACULTY

Faith Adiele’s (Creative Nonfiction) new Calm sleep story, narrated by acclaimed actor Idris Elba, was released on December 1, which was #GivingTuesday. For every listen of “Kingdom of the Sky,” Calm will donate $1 (and up to $100k) to support RED’s fight against AIDS and COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. 

Doom Eternal: The Ancient Gods – Part One by id Software saw instructor Tobias S. Buckell (Popular Fiction) in the credits under Writing and also in Story Development, his first foray into writing in-game content for a major platform game. Tobias also edited and had a story in the anthology Reclaim, Restore, Return: Futurist Tales from the Caribbean, published for the 2020 Bocas Lit Fest in Trinidad. Other short stories appeared in editor John Joseph Adams Dystopia Triptych, Escape Pod: The Science Fiction Anthology, and Slate Magazine. He just turned in his latest novel, A Stranger in the Citadel, to Audible Originals, which will be out in May 2021.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote a feature for The New York TimesHow New York City Vaccinated 6 Million People in Less Than a Month. He’s also at work on a young-adult book about Frank Serpico, the New York City cop who famously exposed systemic corruption in the NYPD.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) short story “My Darling Socialist” was chosen as a finalist in the Saints and Sinners Festival fiction contest for 2020-21. It will be published in the Festival’s 2021 anthology, forthcoming from Bold Strokes Books.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) The Book of Lamps and Banners received a rave review from Locus Magazine, and was named one of the year’s top 5 crime novels by Crime Reads/LitHub, one of the year’s top 10 thrillers by Crime Fiction Lover, and made LitReactor’s list of the year’s best novels. It was also noted in Fine Books Magazine in their roundup of best books about books. The audiobook was named one of the year’s best audiobooks by both Slate and AudioFile Magazine. Elizabeth was featured on the podcast 99% Invisible, talking about novelizations. Her recent reviews include Christopher Golden’s novel Red Hands and J.R.R. Tolkien’s Letters from Father Christmas, both for The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting, Writing for Social Change) will lead a virtual Playwriting Workshop called ACT ONE for the Charlotte Writer’s Club North, based in Charlotte NC, on February 27, 2021. Her personal essay “Covid Class of 2020” was published in NOW, a new online literary journal from the wonderful Hobart Festival of Women Writers, co-founded by Breena Clarke.

ALUMS

The film short The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, adapted by Elisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) from her memoir of the same title, screened in December at the Academy-accredited Leuven International Short Film Festival in Belgium. In March, the film screens at the Academy-accredited Tampere Film Festival in Finland. That month the film will also be part of Discover Film Awards in London.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) is thrilled to announce the appearance of her story “An Embrace of Poisonous Intent” in the anthology Bitter Distillations: An Anthology of Poisonous Tales, published by Egaeus Press. This hardcover edition is limited to 340 copies. December also came with news that her linked vignettes created for a shared world were published in The Lost Citadel Roleplaying Game, which opens with a story by Elizabeth Hand.

Ryan Brod (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) has an essay coming out in the next issue of The Maine Review (Issue 7.1)He’s excited to start another semester teaching creative nonfiction at the University of New England.

J Brooke (Poetry, S’19) had “Nowhere to be Found is Atonement,” a poem about Yom Kippur during the pandemic, published by Detour Ahead Literary Magazine. J has enjoyed a number of essay publications in 2020, yet rarely has poems accepted for publication. Not complaining, though—merely commenting.

Terri Glass‘s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) poem “Unexpected Visitor” will be published in San Diego Poetry Annual 2021, and her poem “Amid all this Light” will appear in Issue 13 of Young Raven’s Literary Review. She will be reading on January 30 from her new book of poetry, Being Animal, via Zoom for the Watershed Festival, an environmental poetry festival based out of Berkeley, CA. Check her website, terriglass.com, for the link and time.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) engaged in a wide-ranging conversation with blogger Dr. Deborah Adamy on December 14. They discussed Hovey’s memoir, She Said God Blessed Us: A Life Marked by Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Church, in the larger context of truth telling in this tumultuous year. 

Nina Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) had an essay published in Kveller that starts like this: “A few years ago, my then 19-year old son called me from Norway via FaceTime to ‘share some news.’ Benya was spending a gap year in my native country. He was anxious about our conversation, an unease that was obvious to me—the mama bear back in the States—as soon as I saw his sweet punim on the screen. // ‘Mama, I’ve been meaning to talk to you about some things…’ he began.”

Nylah Lyman (Poetry, S’10) has signed a contract with Encircle Publications. They will publish her poetry collection in September 2021.

Catharine H Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be opening Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life to a fourth cohort this month. This five-week live online series will meet Tuesdays at 10:00 a.m. EDT starting January 26, 2021. To register or for more information, go to catharinehmurray.com (the direct link).

On January 8th, Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be moderating The Journey You Must Take, a conversation between debut authors Maggie Downs and Katherine E. Standefer, hosted by PRINT Bookstore and Portland’s Mechanics Hall. In Braver Than You Think, Maggie backpacks around the world to visit countries her mother—struck with early-onset Alzheimer’s—cannot make it to herself. In Katherine’s book Lightning Flowers, she travels to mines across Africa and the American West trying to understand whether her potentially-lifesaving implanted cardiac defibrillator might have caused loss of life along its supply chain. The dialogue will be enhanced by Jenny’s own 2014 solo trek across Finland (the subject of her current book project and Stonecoast thesis) following the footsteps of a female legend into the heart of the Arctic Circle. Guaranteed to be rich and vulnerable, this conversation will travel from what it takes to move from knowing you need to do something to actually doing it, to the financing of such journeys, to the craft challenges of telling personal stories that unfold in foreign contexts, to the unexpected things that happen along the trail, to the way grief can change along a journey. Register for the (free) event here.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) will be one of the featured poets reading for (Un)Cloistered Poetry on Sunday, January 10, at 6:00 p.m. Email EllieOLeary@gmail.com for the Zoom link.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has contracted her latest novel, Aventurine, to Encircle Publications, with an expected publication date of January 2022. This will be Anne’s fifth published novel. She joins Stonecoaster Kevin St. Jarre as an Encircle author.

Meghan Vigeant‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) essay “The Shame Files” is about the contents of a plain, brown file labeled “Sexual Assault 2010.” It appears in the Stonecoast Review, issue 14, winter 2021. 

Adrienne S. Wallner’s (Poetry, W’09) debut poetry collection To the 4a.m. Light is now available for preorder from Finishing Line Press. For every book ordered before January 30, 2021, buyers will receive a one-of-a-kind bookmark, each with a unique line of poetry from To the 4 a.m. Light handwritten by the author. Bookmarks will be mailed after January 30, unless arrangements are made by contacting the author. All books will be shipped on the official release date of March 26, 2021. To order, go here. Read Adrienne’s blog at www.inkinthebranches.com. Find Adrienne on IG & FB @inkinthebranches. Click here to sign up for Adrienne’s newsletter.

An essay by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) appears in the 2020 anthology Friends: Voices on the Gift of Companionship, published by Jack Walker Press. “Dear Anne” was inspired by a 25-year correspondence that began in childhood.

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Community News & Updates November 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Stonecoast Alumni Scriptwriting Workshop: The Next Step – Rehearsing your Script! – Winter 2021!!

Instructors: Tom Coash (Scriptwriting/Playwright) and Jeni Mahoney (Scriptwriting/Artistic Director of the Seven Devils New Play Foundry)

A huge part of scriptwriting is learning to collaborate and glean valuable information about your script during the rehearsal process. Being in a room with really smart, talented people, all working together, readying your script for the public is an incredibly inspiring, unique experience. Scriptwriters, in this special, four-session, alumni workshop, will submit a ten-minute play/screenplay and during the course of the workshop will read, discuss, rewrite, and REHEARSE these pieces for an online, post-residency Stonecoast public reading. Taking advantage of the online residency possibilities, we will bring in professional, guest artist actors and directors from all over the country to rehearse each play individually in online breakout rooms. Writers will have one-on-one sessions with their directors, rehearsals with actors/directors, discussion of scripts with workshop members, and opportunities to observe other rehearsals. Come join us and see your script brought to life by some of the best talent in the country. All levels of scriptwriting experience welcome.

This workshop is also open to writers who have not attended Stonecoast. So, please tell your friends. Space is limited, sign up asap! Contact Tom Coash (thomascoash@sbcglobal.net) or the Stonecoast office for more information: stonecoastmfa@maine.edu or 207-780-4423.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Natalie Harris-Spencer‘s (Fiction) short story “Phrenology,” which she shared in David Anthony Durham’s “Grim Tidings” workshop last residency, will be published in the next issue of The Dark City Crime & Mystery Magazine.

FACULTY

Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) wrote two episodes in the new HBO Max mini-documentary series A World of Calm, which premiered on October 1st and is designed for relaxation. Her episodes are #8 “Horses,” narrated by Kate Winslet, and #10 “Water,” narrated by Mahershala Ali. The trailer is available here. Faith also has an essay in the anthology Alone Together: Love, Grief & Comfort in the Time of COVID; sales go to benefit indie bookstores.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Writing for Social Change) was awarded an individual fellowship from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities. 

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) new novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, continues to receive rave reviews, including from The New York Times Book Review, which wrote, “Cass Neary is a remarkable heroine. As with Sherlock Holmes, her power lies in the act of seeing what ordinary people cannot, only where Holmes brings clues to light, Neary is content to linger in the dark. Her eye catches the liminal spaces between clarity and shadow so well I found myself rereading passages for the beauty of her way of seeing.” Oprah Magazine named Liz’s 2015 novel Wylding Hall one of the 29 greatest gothic novels of all time. In October, she taught at the NYC Writer’s Hotel virtual writer’s conference, and led an online workshop on supernatural fiction at Clarion West.  

Scriptwriting Instructor Jeni Mahoney, the Producing Artistic Director of Seven Devils Playwrights Conference, was featured in a recent American Theatre Magazine article celebrating the 20th anniversary of the program, which she founded in 2001. Since 2001, Seven Devils has supported the development of more than 220 plays, including Veils by Scriptwriting Faculty member Tom Coash, who now serves on the Seven Devils Board of Directors.

ALUMS

Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) short story “Dr. Catalyst,” which she workshopped while at Stonecoast with Liz Hand and fellow students, was turned into a 55-minute production by No Sleep Podcast. Her short story is featured in Season 15, Episode 5, and begins around the one hour, thirty-eight minute mark.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’16) has a piece of humorous horror titled “The Stages of Monster Grief: A Guide for Middle-Aged Vampires” in the anthology Coffin Blossoms, which was published by Jolly Horror Press in October 2020. She also appeared on the panels Building SF&F Mythologies and Modern Age of Poetry at MileHiCon 52. 

J Brooke (Poetry, S’19) won Honorable Mention in Streetlight Magazine’s 2020 Essay/Memoir contest. A review of the essay “Finding Barbie’s Shoes” said, “J Brooke’s ‘Finding Barbie’s Shoes,’ an elliptical narration of how something as small as the foot of a Barbie doll can lead to consideration of topics larger and more painful. There is humor in this account, but also that edge of reality we all have to contend with. Its two poles inform each other.” The essay can be read here.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has stories in The Quilliad and Nightmare this month. She is also pleased to announce the one-year anniversary of the ephemera reading series. Join readers Kate Heartfield, Fonda Lee, and Vivian Li, and performer Kari Maaren, on November 18 at 7:00 p.m. EST.

teri elam (Poetry, S’19) had two poems published in Limp Wrist magazine: “On Writing A Fan Letter To Lynda Carter Circa 1975” and “On Being Called The N-Word In Atlanta, 2016: A Southern Ghazal.” Her ghazal has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. teri will also have two essays, “Memory as Dance: The Darktown Strutters’ Ball” and “In Praise of Greenwood,” included in the exhibition catalog for the upcoming Greenwood Art Project. This project will commemorate the centennial anniversary of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre and the historic Black Wall Street.

Colleen Hennessy‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’20) essay “Motherhood in Irish Nonfiction: Abortion and Agency” appeared in the fall issue of Assay: Journal of Nonfiction Studies. The research and analysis arose from her third semester paper and graduation seminar at Stonecoast. 

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) annually writes a Christmas novella; On One Condition is available on the kindle app.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) is thrilled to announce that her short story “The Quilt” was published last month in Willows Wept Review. The story is about climate change, fracking, and the enduring nature of love, with a bit of magic realism and ancient mythology thrown in. Bonus points if you can determine what mythological figures and events it’s inspired by.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) recently had an essay in Past Ten, a literary project exploring the transformative power of time and the human condition to turn the unpredictable into art, by asking contributors, “Where were you ten years ago on this date?” She also had an essay out in The Forward, the country’s oldest Jewish newspaper (founded in 1897) about her recent reckoning with her misguided use of the Yiddish word schwartze, when she was a 23-year old convert to Judaism.

Nylah Lyman‘s (Poetry, S’10) poem “Noah’s Wife” has been accepted by Stonecoast Review for publication January 2021.

Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be opening her live online memoir classes to a new cohort this month. Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life is open for enrollment. This five-week live online course begins Thursday, November 12, from 12:00-1:30 p.m. EDT. Memoir: Craft and Application also will be open to new students starting this month with Thursday or Saturday classes, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EDT. To apply or for more information, visit www.catharinehmurray.com or email her at writingwithcatharine@gmail.com

First Light,” Jenny O’Connell‘s(Creative Nonfiction, S’17) essay about finding home in the wild waters of Maine, appears in the November issue of Decor Maine. Her opera libretto on advocacy and domestic violence during quarantine, “The Sky Where You Are,” was produced by An Opera Theatre of Minneapolis and premiered worldwide last month as part of the Decameron Opera Coalition’s “Tales from a Safe Distance.” Tickets are available through the end of the year. 

Suri Parmar (Popular Fiction, W’17) has a new story titled “Lady of the Slake” in Upon a Once Time, a color print anthology of reimagined fairy-tale mash-ups published by Air and Nothingness Press. Suri’s story is an interpretation of Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Wild Swans” combined with the Arthurian literary cycle. 

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has poems in two anthologies released in October: “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgments” appears in Show Us Your Papers from Main Street Rag Publishing, and “Le Rire ” appears in its original French alongside his English translation in The Very Edge Poems from Flying Ketchup Press.

J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) was made Canon Poet of Grace Episcopal Cathedral, Charleston, South Carolina, on October 11th, 2020.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) short story “Chuligani,” published in Solstice Literary Magazine, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Kevin’s novel Aliens, Drywall, and a Unicycle will launch virtually at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 10. Hosted by Longfellow Books of Portland, Maine, and Encircle Publications, Kevin will be joined in conversation by author Bill Roorbach. To register in advance for this meeting please use this link. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the event.

Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’06) is currently writing a series of weekly essays: “2020: Life in the Time of Pandemic.” Her blog site is Kathleensullivan.substack.com. The essays are the process notes of a poet, a psychotherapist, a grandmother, three quarters of a century old as she makes sense of this extraordinary moment in history.

Morgan Talty’s (Fiction, W’19) short story “The Name Means Thunder,” which originally appeared in the Fall 2019 issue of The Georgia Review, was selected as a Distinguished Story for The Best American Short Stories 2020

The Learned Pig published Darlene Taylor‘s (Fiction, W’17) “Haunting Stones” essay as a Root Mapping feature. The essay can be read in the online journal here. Also, Darlene won a D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities Fellowship; she plans to complete the work noted in “Haunting Stones” as part of the fellowship. Separately, as part of her continued service to the arts community, Darlene has been named an Advisory Board member of The Clifton House located in Maryland. The Clifton House honors creative work and the legacy of Lucille Clifton in the Baltimore home where she lived with her family and wrote poetry.

Meghan Vigeant‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) flash non-fiction story “Don’t Live Past Ninety, Dear” appeared on Multiplicity‘s blog in October. 

Stonecoast fiction alum (W’19) sidney woods was honored that “Monsoon” was recently published in Brilliant Flash Fiction (under pen name sid sibo).  

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Community News & Updates June 2020

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE STONECOAST MFA VIRTUAL WRITING SERIES
Join us Monday, June 8th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. for “Rolled in Sugar: Food as an Entry into a Moment” with Stonecoast Director Justin Tussing. Like Proust’s madeleine, we’ll talk about food and writing and where both can take us. Link to join is here. The Stonecoast Virtual Writing Series is an effort to connect our community and continue learning together from afar. Led by a faculty member or guest instructor, sessions are held monthly.

 

CURRENT STUDENTS

Lauren Erin O’Brien‘s (Fiction, S’20) poem “After She Reads the Court Records” is forthcoming in the Fall/Winter 2020 issue of Witness.

 

FACULTY

Martín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new collection of poems, called Floaters, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January 2021.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about sports, crime, and social issues. In May, he wrote a feature about baseball for ESPN’s The Undefeated: J.L. Wilkinson Stood Out as the Only White Owner in the First Official Negro League. His next young-adult book is due out in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists wrongly convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) forthcoming Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, was named one of fall’s most anticipated titles by CrimeReads/LitHub. She was interviewed by The Coode Street Podcast, discussing pandemic reading. Her recent reviews include Megan Capisi’s Sin Eater and N.K. Jemisin’s The City We Became, both for The Washington Post.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) was profiled in The San Diego Union Tribune on Saturday, May 24.

Authors Ryan Craig Bradford and Nancy Holder

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and her theater cohorts are finding ways for the Shows to Go On in these challenging times: Michael Teoli, composer and “co-conspirator” with Elizabeth on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, performed two of his and Elizabeth’s songs from their rock opera in May on the Los Angeles-based Stealing Focus Digital Cabaret.
In a new May interview, the stars of the 2020 TheatreZone production of Tonya & Nancy—Whitney Winfield and Nikki Miller—discuss their “joyous” experience doing the rock opera in February and also the new realities of the theater world since then, on ZoomIntoTheZone.

Elizabeth and composer Michael Teoli, who did the music on Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, with book & lyrics by Elizabeth

Join Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) online June 1 at 1:00 p.m. for a conversation with Meredith O’Brien, author of the newly released Uncomfortably Numb, her memoir on the life-altering diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and on the practice of narrative medicine. The free event will include some details about Bay Path University’s upcoming Narrative Medicine Certificate. Please register for the webinar here.

 

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, was mentioned in a recent New York Times essay by Helen Macdonald, author of H is for Hawk. Macdonald’s essay on pandemic quarantine and birdwatching is available at this link.

Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction, W’19) was interviewed on episode 92 of a podcast called Thrill Seekers Radio with Alex Dolan to help advertise The Jack Harper Trilogy (Pivot, Perish, and Peak).

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) appeared at the 2020 SFWA Nebula Conference on the “Finishing What You Didn’t Start: Editors Making Projects Their Own” panel.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) had a short story published in the May-June issue of Uncanny Magazine called “Through the Veil.”

J Brooke’s (Poetry, S’19) essay “Kaden has Covid” was a winner of Beyond Words Literary Magazine’s Dream Challenge and appears in the June issue online and in hard copy (essay can also be read in eir website jbrookewrites.com).

The ephemera reading series has gone virtual! Co-chaired by KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) and editor Jen R. Albert, ephemera is a monthly reading series showcasing diverse SFF. Catch the next event on June 17th, 7:00 p.m. ET, live on YouTube. ephemera was also recently nominated for an Aurora Award in the Best Fan Organizational category. It is funded by the Ontario Arts Council.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce the charity anthology Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES is now available as both a paperback and ebook! This book is a culmination of a long year of work and a lot of help from some amazing creatives with Julie at the helm as Editor-in-Chief. Playful, whimsical, or dark, but always thoughtful and tinged with the inexplicably weird, the Weird Dream Society brings together twenty-three stories from the most innovative creators in speculative fiction, including Nathan Ballingrud, Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Gregory Norman Bossert, Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), Christopher Brown, Emily Cataneo, Julie C. Day, Michael J Deluca, Gemma Files, A.T. Greenblatt, Nin Harris, Chip Houser, James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty), Marianne Kirby, Kathrin Köhler, Matthew Kressel, Jordan Kurella, Premee Mohamed, Sarah Read, Sofia Samatar, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13), Steve Toase, and A.C. Wise. All proceeds from the anthology go to RAICES, which envisions a compassionate society where all people have the right to migrate and human rights are guaranteed.
Paperback: Amazon | Barnes&Noble | IndieBound.org
eBook: Amazon | Kobo | B&N Nook | Weightless Books
What Others Are Saying

  • “I adore it…These stories are what weird should be. Each one is a different subgenre and [yet] its own beast all together…I’m just feeling electrified by the stories in this collection…they are all connected in the places that matter. They are weird, they are genre, and they contain fantastic prose I’ll keep coming back to over and over again.” ~Paul Jessup, Vernacular Books Guest Review
  • “..the dream-like quality of the stories delivers on the promise of the title….the collection as a whole weaves in moments of profound strangeness, places where the rules of the universe seem to bend and buckle….There are ghosts of a shopping mall, and little girls with superpowers, and a man who can change skins….For fans of dark fantasy and science fiction, there’s a whole lot to like….And there are still moments of hope and clarity, tucked in among the shattered dreams the collection catalogs.” ~Charles Payseur, Quick Sip Reviews  

In addition to the anthology, Julie’s story “After the Apocalypse There Will Be Memory Poems” can now be found in the May 3rd issue of Vol.1 Brooklyn as part of their Sunday Stories series. This is a redrafted version of a piece from Julie’s thesis and a story that demanded a home. Julie’s story “Speculative Execution” is out this month in the anthology The Way of the Laser: Future Crime Stories, edited Stonecoast alums Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) and Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11). It’s a story about A.I.-infused glass, theft, and friendship in a networked city where no one is entirely alone.

Jessica de Koninck‘s (Poetry, S’11) poem “Virtual Seder” was a winner in the Writer’s Almanac Pandemic Poetry Contest. In an interview, Garrison Keillor discussed the poem with her as well as reading her poem “Repairs.” The full Zoom interview can be seen on the Writer’s Almanac website.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) published a flash creative nonfiction piece, “The Simplest Recipe,” in Hippocampus.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) won a Nebula Award in the category of Game Writing for his work on The Outer Worlds, a spacefaring RPG that values player agency, player choice, and tells a story as morbid as it is fun. This is Paul’s first nomination, his first award, and as of writing this he’s celebrating with his cat. He’s currently working on an expansion to the game, launch date TBD.

Nylah Carpenter Lyman (Poetry, S’10) has had a poem titled “Making a Field” selected for Poetic License, a written word and visual arts exhibition, managed in collaboration by The Poetry Barn and the Arts Society of Kingston, NY. The process first involved having her poem chosen by the editorial team at Poetic License as a finalist.  Those poems were then forwarded on to visual artists at ASK. Once there, her poem was one of those selected by a visual artist, and so it will be mounted with the artist’s interpretation in an exhibition to be held in August 2020 at ASK’s gallery. If possible, the poets will be invited to come and read at the exhibition’s opening. The poems, and the paintings that were inspired by them, will be posted in a special issue on our sister site, The Poetry Distillery. While the gallery has been closed due to the COVID-19 crisis, they plan to reopen in June.

The Next Generation Indie Book Awards picked Tom MacDonald’s (Fiction, W’09) Dermot Sparhawk crime series—The Charlestown Connection (2011), Beyond the Bridge (2103), The Revenge of Liam McGrew (2015), Murder in the Charlestown Bricks (2018)—as a finalist in the series category. Also, the crime anthology Coast to Coast: Noir will publish a Dermot Sparhawk short story called “Nashua River Floater” in its 2020 edition, due out in June.

Daily Science Fiction published Dan McMinn’s (Popular Fiction, W’20) short story “Advice for Newbies at WoodCon” on May 5th.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W‘06) is pleased to have her short story “Gridlock” in the spring 2020 issue of Solstice Magazine. It was wonderful working with Lee Hope again!

Starting Saturday, June 6th, Catharine H. Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will be teaching Memoir 101: Writing the Stories of Your Life, a weekly live Zoom class for five Saturdays, 10:00-11:30 a.m. EDT. For more information, click here.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) creative nonfiction piece, “Things You Gave Me When You Left,” is online at The Real Story. Also, John was recently interviewed for a quarantine podcast by the folks at DUM DUM Zine, where it will be featured online shortly.

The concrete poem “Tree,” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the next issue of The Comstock Review.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Barking Dog Nocturnal” appeared in The Offing.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) short story “What Remains” was recently published in Volume 26 of Quarter After Eight. Her short story “Eve” was named a finalist for Iron Horse Review‘s Trifecta Award in Fiction. Her memoir, The Angle of Flickering Light, has been accepted by Vine Leaves Press and is forthcoming in April 2021.

“Church Camp,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Spring 2020 issue of Trajectory, a journal based in Frankfort, KY.

 

 

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Community News & Updates January 2016

ALUMS

Catwalk_NewElisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) received a 2016 National Endowment of the Arts fellowship. There were 1,763 submissions this year and 37 fellowships awarded. NEA press release can be viewed here.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to share that Catwalk, the third book in her Animals in Focus Mystery series from Midnight Ink, is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for fiction in the Dog Writers Association of America’s annual writing competition. The first book in her series, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and the second book, The Money Bird, was a finalist last year. Winners will be announced in February.

Blood RegisterPaul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has published “Blood Register,” a short story for the Pillars of Eternity campaign setting. Find it on Obsidian Entertainment’s media/stories page alongside the work of his colleagues.

Nylah Lyman‘s (Poetry, S’10) poem “God and Illness” has been accepted for publication in the winter 2015 issue of Poetry Quarterly.

Susan MacLean, pen Name S.J. MacLean (Fiction, S’06), was awarded First Prize in Fiction in the Briar Cliff Review annual fiction contest. Her fiction has appeared or will appear in Inkwell, Pennsylvania Literary Review, May Day Magazine (New American Press) and several San Francisco newspapers.

Autumn Newman‘s (Poetry, ’09) double-sonnet, “Shopping with Whitney Houston,” has been published by Able Muse in their Winter 2015 issue. You can see a video of her reading the poem on their website. This poem has also been nominated for a Pushcart poetry prize by the editor of Able Muse. 

Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) served as Visiting Artist in October 2015 at Bay Path University, where she spoke with university classes and taught workshops, lectured at Writers’ Day, and was the featured speaker for the Kaleidoscope Series; she will join the Bay Path University writing faculty in January 2016. At the end of October, Alexis presented on a panel (with Summer ’13 CNF alum Penny Guisinger) about the dangers of publishing narrative nonfiction at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ. Her essay “Drunkalogue Diptych” appears in the Fall 2015 issue of The Pinch, and essay “Entropy as Islands as Stars” will be published in the Winter 2016 issue of the New Madrid Journal. Her work has also been accepted into the anthology Second Blooming, forthcoming from Mercer University Press, edited by Susan Cushman. Her essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in March, was nominated by the Sunday Rumpus Essay editors for a Pushcart Prize; this is her second Pushcart nomination.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) had two stories appear in December. Her Stonecoast-workshopped “In the City of Martyrs” appeared on The Toast, and her story “Sleepers,” originally in Interzone, appeared in audio on The Overcast. 

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a story in the January 2016 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, titled “The Singing Bowl.” Another story first published in Asimov’s, “The Redemption of Kip Banjeree,” appears in translation in a recent issue of the Russian science fiction magazine Esli.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jennifer Castello (Popular Fiction), Marian Rosarum (Popular Fiction, S’15), and Theodora Goss (Faculty) have had a panel accepted to the upcoming International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. This cross-genre panel is titled: “The Wonder Piece in Alternate History: Using Fantastical and Scientific Elements to Highlight the Past, Present, and Future.” M.W. Bychowski from George Washington University will also be appearing on this panel. They will present in Orlando, FL, in mid-March.

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FACULTY

Sarah Braunstein‘s (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) essay “Night of the Moose” is forthcoming in The Sun magazine (February 2016). In January, she will teach at the National YoungArts Foundation in Miami.

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was a literary Guest of Honor at Comic-Con Portugal in early December. The film option for Gabriel’s Story has been renewed (for the thirteenth time!) by Redwave Films, and Pride of Carthage has gone into its second option period with Sonar Entertainment. They’re hoping to develop it as a television miniseries.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching a four-week class titled “Becoming a Better Writer: Revising and Rewriting” at legendary DC bookstore Politics and Prose this coming February. His short story “Loo Rolls” is a finalist in the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival Contest. As a finalist, the story will be published in an anthology published by Bold Strokes Books. To learn more about this international festival of LGBT literature, which takes place April 1-3 in New Orleans, see www.sasfest.org.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be a guest (and the only U.S. writer!) at the 2016 Crimetime Gotland literary festival, Sweden’s celebration of Nordic Noir. She’s just been announced as guest of honor at the 2017 World Horror Convention, along with George R. R. Martin and Peter Crowther. Recent work includes a Washington Post piece on writing novelizations, a Los Angeles Times review of the iconic Finnish writer Leena Krohn, and a column on tribute anthologies to Octavia Butler and Samuel R. Delany for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will be a guest at Gallifrey One: Station 27, the 27th Annual North American Dr. Who Convention. Gallifrey will be held February 12-14 at the Marriott Los Angeles International Airport Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. She will be teaching “Finding the Scary” (Workshop #15) at Horror University, which takes place during the 2016 Horror Writers Association StokerCon™ May 12-15 at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas. Nancy has accepted an invitation to be a keynote speaker at the Spokane Film and Literary Convention (“Connecting Writers with Hollywood”) in Spokane, WA, next September 8-10. She has also accepted an invitation to preside over the Horror Writers Association 2017 StokerCon™ as Toastmistress  in April 2017 aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA; guests will include George R.R. Martin.

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51Px4GD+sML._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_Upcoming on January 12:  Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) massive (700 page!) career retrospective collection from Centipede Press.  This is a limited edition aimed at book collectors in the Masters of Science Fiction series, which has honored some of the greats of the genre.  It’s called (surprise) James Patrick Kelly: Masters of Science Fiction. Jim is the first living author to be chosen for this series.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 20-minute play Sully’s Gone will be part of “Evening Broadcasts” (think Twilight Zone), which will run Jan 22-Feb 7 at The Players’ Ring Theatre, in Portsmouth, NH. Reservations are encouraged.

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StonecoastRElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) have signed on bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard and soap star Cady McClain, a two-time Daytime Emmy winner, for their forthcoming 2017 anthology on Soap Operas. The book will also include a poem by the current lead star of The Bold and The Beautiful, Thorsten Kaye, as well as an essay by Stonecoast’s own star poet and author Ted Deppe. Elizabeth and Suzanne are also happy to have work together in the new December 2015 issue of The Stonecoast Review.

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Community News & Updates November 2015

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W’12) short story “The Last Laugh” will appear in the November issue of Strangelet Journal.

Strange-HorizonsKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited to share her very first professional narration—“The Wives of Azhar” by Roshani Chokshi—which she recorded for Strange Horizons Magazine.  Also, the first issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring Stonecoast alums Bonnie Stufflebeam (fiction) and Adam Gallardo (nonfiction) and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

apb-anthoJennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has a flash fiction story “Innocent Bysanders” in APB: Artists Against Police Brutality, an anthology published by Rosarium Publishing that confronts the many persistent problems plaguing the American criminal justice system. All proceeds generated from this project will be donated to The Innocence Project.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Thirteen Tuesdays of Saint Anthony” is now available online in Farrago’s Wainscot Issue 16. It feels like the perfect match. Julie truly hopes the two will be blissfully happy, though considering the story’s subject matter, perhaps not. In more happy news, her story “The Faces Between Us” was republished in audio form as part of Podcastle 386. Finally, Julie’s story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the print and e-anthology Gaia: Shadow and Breath Vol. 2. 

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay, “Rochambeau and the Mystery of Racetrack Playa” will be coming out in Young Ravens Literary Review November 23. Her poem “Just Another Day” will be published in an anthology, Earth Blessings, Spring 2016. And her poem “The Pond People” is forthcoming in The San Diego Poetry Annual, Spring 2016. Terri’s new website is up and running with everything finally under one roof. Peruse the poetry, prose and send her a note.

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IMG_0296Kristin LaTour‘s (Poetry, S’07) first full-length collection, What Will Keep Us Alive, is available for pre-order from Sundress Publications. Luis Alberto Urrea, author of The Hummingbird’s Daughter, says, “Kristin LaTour’s American song flies from the heartland full of sun, shadow, full winds and explosions of lightning all along its highways. Wonderful and alive.” And Lesléa Newman, author of I Carry My Mother and October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard, wrote, “The poems in What Will Keep Us Alive are told in a strong, authoritative voice that made me sit up and listen. ‘Break me like a stained cup.’ ‘Let the sparkle fall from your fingers.’ ‘Light a match and wander west.’ I will do as these poems command willingly and eagerly, for Kristin LaTour is a poet who has something to say and isn’t afraid to say it. Fierce, funny, fearless, and finely crafted, these are fabulous poems I will read, ponder, and share with friends, colleagues, and students again and again and again.” Free shipping with pre-orders.

51gFPhEYytL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_Jeanette Lynes (Poetry/Fiction, ’05) released her seventh book of poetry—Bedlam Cowslip: The John Clare Poems (Wolsak & Wynn’s Buckrider Books imprint)—this month. The book was launched with readings in Toronto, Manchester, and London.

On October 22-24, 2015, New Rivers Press will host a release party at three different venues over three days. The events will feature book signing, author readings and interaction, a silent auction, and the selling of their four most recent publications. These include the annual American Fiction: Volume 14 collection, which was edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) and won the 2014 Gold Medal for short fiction from The Midwest Independent Publishers Association; Wrestling with Angels by Daniel Gabriel; Home Studies by Julie Gard; and Flashcards and the Curse of Ambrosia by Tracy Robert. On Thursday, October 22nd, there will be a reading at 8 pm in Minnesota State University’s Comstock Memorial Union, Room 101. On Friday, there will be another reading at the Spirit Room along with hors d’oeuvres and a silent auction. Lastly, on Saturday there will be a 12:00 p.m. reading at the Red River Market.

Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, ’12) has been working with the actor Jeff Daniels on the story of his life and the history of the theater he established in Chelsea, MI. The Purple Rose of Chelsea will be released this month.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), was pleased when her essay which appeared on Brain, Child a few weeks ago, “I Survived Postpartum Depression, But it Never Left Me,” caught the attention of maternal and mental health organizations, sparking conversation about the lingering effects of PPD. Another piece, “The Horsey Set,” appears in a new anthology, Unfinished Chapters. In October, Lisa presented two seminars (one on publishing personal essays, another on working with incomplete memories in memoir) at the NJ Women Who Write conference in Madison, NJ; and she read from her memoir manuscript and appeared on the panel “Death: Italian American Style” at the national Italian American Studies Association conference in Washington D.C. An interview with Lisa appears at Your Blog Connection, about how she uses her blog to help other writers.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) and Nylah Lyman (Poetry, S’10) have been invited to spend a week at La Muse Artists and Writers Retreat in southern France. The retreat is held in a manor house, some parts of which date back to the 12th century, and is about 25 minutes into the mountains near Carcassonne. The website for La Muse is here.

La Muse from the river in the valley..

La Muse from the river in the valley..

ci_harlemrenChristopher Allen Varlack (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) published an edited collection of critical essays on literature of the Harlem Renaissance with Salem Press in October. The book is available from Salem Press and Amazon for purchase.

Anne Witty (Poetry, W’12) has been named the winner of The New Guard Knightville Poetry Contest for her piece “Contact Sheets,” which will be published in The New Guard Vol. V in 2016.

 

FACULTY

Issue10_499x648Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was on the cover of Locus Magazine‘s October issue, featuring an interview about her recent novel Wylding Hall and forthcoming Hard Light. Her recent reviews include Patti Smith’s M Train and William Sloane’s The Rim of Morning for the Washington Post, and Stacy Schiff’s The Witches: Salem 1692 for the Los Angeles Times.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has two poems in the current issue of The Denver Quarterly 50.1 (2015).

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will be doing several events in November: on November 16, she will read at Newtonville books from the new anthology Me, My Hair & I: Twenty Seven Women Untangle an Obsession. The anthology was a “Book of the Week” in People magazine and was on Entertainment Weekly‘s “Must” list. On November 30th, Elizabeth will lead a Celebrity Book Club discussion at Newtonville Books. Also Elizabeth will read from her works as Visiting Author at Bacon Free Public Library in Natick, MA on November 17 at 7PM:

OPPORTUNITIES

Damien Shuck (Poetry, ’09) currently serves as a Peace Corps Volunteer in China, working at Southwest University, on of the top-tier universities in China.  He has several opportunities for Stonecoast students and Alumni.

  1. He is currently working on assembling a series of extensive reading textbooks to be published through his University Press. He is looking for all genres—Fiction, Popular Fiction, Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, or Essays—and will accept previously published or unpublished work.  Please submit any number of texts to swutextbooksubmission@outlook.com. Submission deadline: December 31st.
  2. An opportunity for any Stonecoast alumni interested in taking a year to teach in China at Southwest University. Teaching here has been a wonderful opportunity. You will have time to work on studying Chinese, to explore another culture and gain experience, and lots of time to work on writing. Southwest University is a great place to work and I am trying to establish close ties with Stonecoast.

If you are interested in either of these opportunities please contact Damien at damienshuck8@msn.com.

 

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