Tag Archives: Rick Bass

Community News & Updates October 2018

ALUMS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) narrated Y. M. Pang’s story “Subtle Ways Each Time” for the September 20 episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here.

Shawna Borman (Popular Fiction, W’15) is pleased to announce that her short story “Lying Eyes” has been chosen to appear in Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers, Vol. 3, edited by E.R. Bills, alongside a number of talented Texas writers.  Just in time for Halloween, this anthology is sure to deliver a dose of Texas-sized fright to anyone’s season of thrills and chills.

Ryan Brod‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Fiction, S’17) essay, “November Light,” a revision from his thesis, will appear this October in the fall issue of River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative. Order a copy here.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has three successes to share. Her piece “The Five C’s” was published at The Rumpus in September and was then selected for Memoir Monday, a weekly round up of online creative nonfiction. Her essayistic review of CNF chapbooks has been accepted for an upcoming issue of River Teeth. Lastly, Iota: Short Prose Conference was staged for the sixth summer this August and was led by Sven Birkerts and Beth Ann Fennelly. Iota now offers online courses as well, many taught by Stonecoast alumni.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) is the 2018/19 writer-in-residence for HoCoPoLitSo (The Howard County Poetry and Literature Society). Learn more here.

On October 2nd at 7:00 p.m., friends and loved ones of writer Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo (Fiction, S’04) will gather at Print: A Bookstore in Portland, ME, to celebrate the publication of her first novel, The Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda (She Writes Press). Lombardo, who won the PEN/New England Discovery Award for an early draft of Kenzaburo Tsuruda, died in 2015. She was unable to find a home for her novel before being diagnosed with cancer in 2014, and the launch party at Print will mark the end of a long effort on the part of Lombardo’s husband and several of her closest friends to bring her work out into the world. Read more in Shelf Awareness here.

Elisabeth Lombardo

Gregory Martin (Popular Fiction, W’17) is pleased to announce his story “Endangered Species of the Animal Kingdom” will be published in the upcoming anthology The Binge-Watching Cure (Horror Edition). Greg would like to thank Nancy Holder for shepherding this story through several drafts while he was at Stonecoast, and providing suggestions that improved the story immensely.

Catharine H. Murray‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) memoir Now You See the Sky has been published by Akashic BooksNow You See the Sky will launch Ann Hood’s new imprint (Gracie Belle) that will cover the topics of grief and loss. The book has been described as “an essential recommendation for those living with loss” (Suzanne Strempek Shea, author of This is Paradise). And Rick Bass wrote, “There are images in here, gestures of love, and its hard conversations, that a reader will remember forever.” The release party will be at Print Bookstore in Portland on November 7th at 7:00 p.m. The audio book is narrated by the author and will be distributed by Tantor Media, a division of Recorded Books.

Jenny O’Connell‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) piece “The Office of the Mayor of Miessi” appears in the Fall/Winter “Flight” issue of SLICE Magazine. It tells the story of time spent living among the wild men and women of the Lemmenjoki gold fields in Northern Finland during Jenny’s solo trek across Finland in the footsteps of Lappish legend Petronella van der Moer—the journey that formed Jenny’s thesis at Stonecoast. Jenny’s craft article, “Sing it Loud: A Creative Nonfiction Writer Looks to Music for Lessons on Embracing Vulnerability on the Page,” based on her third semester study of vulnerability at Stonecoast, comes out in Creative Nonfiction‘s “Risk” edition this fall. This October, Jenny begins a six-month writing residency awarded by the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation in Rockland, ME, where she hopes to finish the first draft of her book project, Finding Petronella.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poems “Dusk: For John Stanizzi” and “Four Woodpeckers” will appear in the upcoming issue of Coal City Review. His new chapbook, Forms and Shades, will be published this month by Clare Songbirds Publishing. Bruce’s short-story collection, The Trash Detail, will be available November 1st from New Rivers Press.

An essay by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) has been listed in the Notables section of Best American Essays 2018. Her cited piece, “An Attractive Portal to Uncertainty,” was published in the print literary journal Harpur Palate (vol. 16, # 1). Lisa’s work was also listed in BAE 2016. Lisa was recently interviewed at Writers in the Trenches, and her article, “Writing About Family and Friends in Memoir: Nine Key Questions,” appeared in LitChat. On October 13th, Lisa will be on a submission panel and part of the lit-mag-editor pitch sessions at Push to Publish Conference in Philadelphia, and on October 14th she will speak at Writers Day at Bay Path University in East Longmeadow, MA, on writing short pieces on the way to a book. She’s also leading a one-day workshop,  Submissions Smarts, with Cedar Ridge Writers Series, in central New Jersey, on October 20th. On November 1st, Lisa will teach a memoir workshop and appear on an author panel at IDEABoston, “an Italian-inspired festival of books, authors, and culture.”

CURRENT STUDENTS

Colleen Hennessy‘s (Creative Nonfiction) essay about the experience of women in Ireland with Catholicism will be published in Visions and Vocations edited by the Catholic Women Speak. The book, published by Paulist Press, will be launched on October 1st in Rome and aims to elevate the voices of excluded Catholic women for the Synod of Bishops. Colleen Hennessy’s contribution appears alongside Mary McAleese, the former president of Ireland. More information on the book can be found here.

FACULTY

The film adaptation of Tom Coash‘s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) short play Raghead, directed by award-winning Vermont filmmaker Nora Jacobson, will be shown at two different film festivals during October. The short film, under the title The R Word, will be shown October 14th as part of the Kansas International Film Festival (well known for their “social justice” themes). Then again under the original title, Raghead, on October 18th at the Vermont International Film Festival in Burlington, VT.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) ode to the beauty of commas is in the October issue of O, the Oprah Magazine. Aaron is also giving a talk this month at the Library of Congress inspired by his article “Seven Layers of Heaven” in Tablet Magazine on the history of the seven-layer cake, with an original recipe.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) will be in Washington, D.C., on October 29th to moderate the Pen/Faulkner Foundation’s conversation on literary horror with Dan Chaon, Mark Z. Danielewski, and Brian Evenson. She was a judge for the Salam Award for Imagination Fiction, a tribute to the Pakistani theoretical physicist Dr. Abdus Salam and an effort to promote speculative fiction writing in Pakistan. Her article on Sarah Weinstein’s The Real Lolita, about the crime that inspired Nabokov’s novel, recently appeared in The Los Angeles Times. NPR named Hand’s novel Wylding Hall one of the 100 best horror novels and stories; the same week, Signature named her novel Generation Loss one of the 100 best thrillers of all time.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has three new publications out: (1) An adaptation of “Man-size in Marble” by Edith Nesbit for the comic book series Mary Shelley Presents. Nancy is the series writer. (2) “Domino Lady versus the Mummy” in the Return of the Monsters comic book series from Moonstone Books. (3) The short story “Nyarlathotep Came Down to Georgia” in What October Brings, from Celaneo Press.

Amanda Johnston (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) was recently featured on Koop Radio 91.7 FM Austin for People United, originally recorded in April 2018 at Resistencia Bookstore, Austin, TX. Listen here. On October 6th, at Babes Bar in Bethel, VT, she will read with Stonecoast alumna Alexis Paige from their collections Another Way to Say Enter and Not a Place on Any Map (respectively). At NYU Lillian Vernon House in New York City on October 12th, Amanda reads with Marcus Jackson and Dustin Pearson for the Cave Canem New Works Series. Then, on October 27th, at the Texas Book Festival in Austin, TX, she moderates the panel discussion Experimental Poetics with Shayla Lawson, Anastacia-Renee, and Erica Dawson. That same day, at Lit Crawl in Austin, she’ll facilitate a Black Poets Speak Out poetic demonstration at the North Door. Finally, on October 28th, Amanda hosts the TORCH Wildfire Reading Series at Bookwoman Bookstore in Austin, TX.

Elizabeth onstage at 54Below

A concert CD of Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera was released on Sept. 28th from the Grammy-award winning Broadway Records. The CD—Tonya & Nancy: Highlights from the Rock Opera—was recorded at a sold-out concert at 54Below in New York City and featured Broadway stars Ashley Spencer (Grease) and Tony-nominees Lauren Worsham (Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder) and Nancy Opel (Urinetown) as well as Tony LePage (School of Rock), directed by Grammy winner Michael J. Moritz. A CD Launch concert event will take place in NYC this Fall, details TBA. Buy the CD at Broadway Records. Updates: www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

The front and back covers of the CD

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has chronicled her teen crush on Bobby Orr in an essay included in Idol Talk: Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations That Changed Their Livesjust out from McFarland and co-edited by faculty member Elizabeth Searle and Stonecoast alum Tamra Wilson, and featuring an introduction by teen idol Peter Noone of Herman’s Hermits. Suzanne also is booking talks she’ll do in late October and early November with Mags Riordan, subject of her book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both. Any organization interested in hosting the two for a program detailing the latest work by the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Malawi, which Riordan founded 14 years ago in memory of her late son in an area that previously had one doctor for 800,000 people, should contact Suzanne at sess7@comcast.net. Suzanne’s literary events in the next few months:

  • October 2nd, 7:00 p.m — Celebrating Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo of Stonecoast’s inaugural class and the launch of her novelThe Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda,at Print: A Bookstore, in Portland, ME.
  • October 4th, 11th, 18th, and 25th — Leading Four Thursdays of Writing, nights of writing and discussions aimed at starting or restoring a solid writing habit, at Bay Path University, Longmeadow, MA.
  • October 14th — Emceeing Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day, at the university’s Ryan Center in East Longmeadow, MA. Speakers will be Jonathan Green, Karol Jackowski, Lisa Romeo, Sophfronia Scott, and Suzanne.
  • October 16th, 6:30 p.m. — Introducing SexMoneyMurder author Jonathan Green for his talk at Bay Path University’s Hatch Library in Longmeadow, MA.
  • November 3rd, 2:00 p.m. — Speaking at Worcester (MA) Public Library
  • November 15th — Reading with Elizabeth Searle, co-editor, and other contributors to Idol Talk: Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations That Changed Their Lives, at Women’s Lunch Place, Boston

REQUESTS for ACTION

“Surely this time is unprecedented in U.S. history,” writes Rick Bass. “Sometimes we don’t realize when we are living in history—which is always—but for it to be so obvious to us now that we are, it’s hard not to imagine what people will think, looking back at this time. And what an amazing opportunity to be taking our education in Maine, working in Maine, living in Maine, part or all of the year. If you haven’t yet taken the opportunity to contact Senator Susan Collins yet with regard to Trump’s Supreme Court nomination, and to express outrage to all Republican Senators who seem to be falling over themselves to ‘plow through’ with the Kavanaugh nomination before any more assault and misconduct and scandal is uncovered, please do. Senator Collins’ contact info is: https://www.collins.senate.gov/contact/  Your letters—as citizens/residents/employees of Maine—are priceless, in these circumstances. This is one of the last tattered threads of democracy that remains, for now, wherein your letter to Sen. Collins will have disproportionate power. Please use it while you can.”

Bass is also fighting a local battle in Montana, for the protection of public lands—another of the trappings of democracy, like free speech—and asks those correspondents who contact Senator Collins to also consider putting in a word for his beloved Yaak Valley, where an international thru-hiker trail threatens the most endangered population of grizzly bears in Montana. “Send a copy please to Sen. Collins, Senator Jon Tester of Montana, and a copy to the Yaak Valley Forest Council as well.” Bass’s struggles to fight the international thru-trail—“a human highway through the bears’ last designated core habitat”—was recently profiled in a New Yorker podcast by Scott Carrier. Other information about the movement to re-route the trail in order to protect grizzlies (and hikers) can be found on the website. “Your letter doesn’t have to be fancy or complicated,” he says. “Just carry the message that any trail re-route needs to avoid all designated core grizzly habitat. THANK YOU!” He says he is even willing to waive the adverb rule in a special dispensation of gratitude. That’s how desperate it is.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates September 2016

ALUMS

Bailey_SoundofWildSnail_pbk_jkt_rgb_HRThe paperback edition of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S‘15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, launches September 6th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Scholarship ($2500 professional development funds) by the Horror Writers Association. She owes her Stonecoast mentors and classmates so very much and is extremely grateful for this honor and opportunity. Her retelling of murderous little-red-riding-hood, “The Scarlet Cloak,” will be reprinted in Burning Willow Press’s Crossroads in the Dark II: Urban Legends anthology this fall and her dark sci-fi novella tribute to Aliens, “Failsafe,” will be reprinted in Manawaker Studio’s Starward Tales II anthology next year. Her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” appeared in Parsec Inc’s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface Triangulationanthology and is now available for purchase.  Her first novel, a historical piratical romantic LGBT adventure, titled Swift for the Sun, is on schedule for a first quarter 2017 release from DSP Publications. She’s also very excited to announce that she’s sold a flash piece titled “Skin as White as Snow as White as Skin” to Gamut neo-noir magazine some ‘coasters may recognize as inspired by her novel-in-progress The Sleeping Boy, which they helped workshop at residency. She’s thrilled to announce the sale of her poem “Lady of Gold” to Remixt Magazine, especially since it was inspired by a drawing of the same title by Jackson Zorn, a fellow contributor to Stonecoast alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art and Words show. Her lesbian zombie puppeteers vs. terminator robots flash fiction “We Are Still Feeling” will appear in a forthcoming science fiction anthology edited by Stonecoast alumni Cynthia Kraack for Calumet Editions. LONG LIVE STONECOAST!

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “A Pinhole of Light”—which concerns itself with ghost hordes, photography, and transformation—is out in the September/October issue of Black Static. On the podcasting front, episode 116 of Far Fetched Fables and episode 438 of StarshipSofa came out this summer. The first podcast features Julie’s narration of Paul Jessups’s story “Sun Sorrow”; the second includes Julie’s reading of Sunil Patel’s “The Attic of Memories.”

Pinhole

Paula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) has been promoting her novel The Drowning Girls (Mira, 2016) and will be appearing on a thriller writing panel with Kimberly McCreight, Catherine McKenzie, and Emily Bleeker at the Mohegan Sun as part of its Winning Author series on September 30. This summer, Paula spoke on a horror/thriller panel called “Sweet Dreams Aren’t Made of These” at Comic Con with writers Jonathon Maberry and Paul Tremblay. She’ll be featured as part of San Francisco’s LitQuake literary festival on October 15. This fall, she accepted a full-time position as a writing lecturer at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

Mohegan Sun advertisement

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest piece examines post-Olympic depression, and you can read it here. His next book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press in Spring 2017; Bob Costas has written the foreword. John is now putting the finishing touches on his latest crime novel, “The Curiously Confounding Case of Revus Apollo.”

Point Blank by Alan KingAlan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book, Point Blank, which he worked on at Stonecoast with Tim Seibles and Joy Harjo, found a publisher: Silver Birch Press, who will publish it November 2016. Folks can learn more about the book at http://bit.do/PointBlank.

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) is thrilled to announce that Terrapin Books has released  her full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room. For information on ordering or to see a list of places where she will be reading, go to her website: www.jessicadekoninck.com. Cutting RoomShe’d also love to read at a venue near you and welcomes any suggestions.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ’06) is pleased to have her essay “Smoke Signals” published in Guernica.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) will be reading a new as-yet untitled ekphrastic poem as part of Imagistic: 7 Artists, 7 Writers, 7 New Stories, at Hillyer Art Space in Washington, DC, on September 9 at 7:30 p.m. Passehl’s poem is a response to “STC_0002-2 2016-06-08 PFVA” an ethereal infrared photograph of a deer seen in silhouette, by artist Allyson Salomon. The poem interweaves the formal implications of the photograph with imagery, language, and proper names relating to the James River Park area of Virginia, where the photo was taken. In Passehl’s poem, discussion of the meaning, presence or absence of God is bracketed by a brief history of the Charles City County born missionary Lott Cary, and rumination on the fate of the deer. Also: Imagistic is the brainchild of Wales-based writer Carole Burns and artist Paul Edwards, and Passehl participated in a previous Imagistic as a visual artist. This is the first time that she will be one of the featured writers. For more information go the Facebook Event page  or contact Janet at janetpassehl@gmail.com

H is for Hoosier: A State Alphabet, written by Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, W’12has been chosen as the official picture book for Indiana schools during the state’s bicentennial year. The book won a Young Hoosier Book Award. Reynolds has completed The Purple Rose of Chelsea, a history chronicling actor Jeff Daniels’ life and the 25th anniversary of the theater he founded in Chelsea, MI, named for the movie he considers his breakthrough from theater to movies. This book is under consideration for a 2016 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), is pleased that Brevity has accepted a narrative essay for its upcoming special issue on race. (Folks, it took six tries to break into this bucket-list pub!) Lisa’s three linked CNF flash pieces, “Funereal,” appear in Issue 2.2 of Change Seven. In July, Hippocampus Magazine ran her narrative essay “The Amazing Technicolor Horse Dream” in their themed issue on “firsts.” Lisa was recently interviewed on the MFA Director’s Blog for Bay Path University, where she teaches in the all-online, all-CNF program.

Richard Squires (Fiction, S’14) is excited to share that a story of his placed second in the Gemini Magazine 2016 Short Story Contest. In addition to publication in the online journal, he won the $100 prize, which officially makes him a Professional Fiction Writer! Thanks to a number of mentors who helped him with this story: Suzanne Strempek Shea, Rick Bass, and Sarah Braunstein. You can read the story here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Clifford Royal Johns’ (Popular Fiction) storyThe Shooting Gallery will appear as the cover story in the September issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (which publishes monthly).

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction) has a short story, “Wolfy Things,” out in audio fantasy magazine PodCastle. The story was workshopped in Erin’s very first residency (thanks Nancy & co!) and can be either listened to or read online. It is her debut publication and bonus story notes can be found on her website.

FACULTY

Harvard ReviewSarah Braunstein (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has a short story in the current issue of The Harvard Review.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) has three new poems in the online journal Número Cinq. They are included in his new book, Liminal Blue, most easily ordered from Kenny’s Bookshop in Galway, which offers free shipping worldwide.

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Drop City” has just been accepted for publication in a forthcoming Wild Cards mosaic novel, Texas Hold ‘Em, edited by George RR Martin. Publication date is yet to be announced.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Blue Points” will be published in volume five of ImageOutWrite Magazine this fall.

King of Crows IVFor the second time, Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has the honor of having written the best “Worst Play,” a precious adaptation of his literary masterpiece about a drug-addled squirrel and chipmunk in mating season, a 10-minute play so egregious that only one producer in the state of Maine would dare breathe life into it. The play, No One Named Johanna, is only one of a full evening of theatre presented in tasty 10-minute servings that run the gamut from serious drama, to farce, to outrageous comedy, to some that can’t be classified. Each has won the monthly Crowbait Club competition in order to be served up here for you. “King of Crows IV: All Hail The King” will be held at the St Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland, ME, on September 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday Sept 11 at 5:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door or ordered online.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) interviewed on Rob Mclennan’s blog.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will have a six-week run in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, starting November 25, 2016; the run was announced in Broadway World, The Chicago Tribune, and more. The Boston Herald featured an interview with Elizabeth in August about Tonya & Nancy as well as her upcoming novel We Got Him (coming out in November) and the feature film development project on her first novel, A Four-Sided Bed.

Tonya & Nancy

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates January 2015

Happy New Year!

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) had a lovely December. Her essay “A Question of Corvids,” winner of the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Creative Nonfiction Award, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for the Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology. Her novel The Money Bird (Midnight Ink, 2013) is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for Fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. And her poem “On Eating My Way Through a Feast of Poems” appeared in Minerva Rising, Issue 6: Food. That poem began as an “evaluation” of a class on using food in writing taught by Cait Johnson, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, and Aaron Hamburger at the summer 2012 residency—you never know where the seeds will be planted!

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) had two stories published by on-line journals in November: (1) “Honor Thy Wife” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and published in Crabfat Literary Magazine. (2) He was the featured fiction writer in Mud Season Review and the story, “Making Weight,” can be viewed here.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the December issue of the online magazine Luna Station Quarterly.

The Fragile World final front coverPaula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) second novel, The Fragile World, was published on October 28 by Harlequin MIRA. She was recently a guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss the book. Her first novel The Mourning Hours (June 2013) was a recent finalist for the Housatonic Book Award (info here). Paula would like to give continued thanks to Ted Deppe, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Boman Desai, who mentored her through early drafts of that book. A third novel is scheduled for publication in 2016. More information can be found on her website or on Facebook.

ZombifiedAdam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) book, Zombified, will be available from Kensington books in stores and online later this month. As a promotion for the book’s release, Kensington will also be offering the e-version of his first book, Zomburbia, for just $2.99 across all platforms.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two CNF pieces published last month: an untitled essay about a tree, an owl, and a growing boy in the “A Place in Mind” section of the Winter 2014 issue of Northern Woodlands and  “Four Days at Russell Pond,” an account of her family’s first backpacking trip, in issue 19 of TrailGroove. She also read an abridged version of her recently published essay, “Here Be Dragons,” at November’s Local Writers at the Local Buzz event in Cape Elizabeth, ME, alongside novelist Maria Padian and poet Christian Barter.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her book manuscript, Plumes: On Contamination of Home and Habitat, was selected by Karen Joy Fowler as the winner of the 2014 Siskiyou Prize in New Environmental Literature. The Siskiyou Prize, sponsored by Ashland Creek Press, honors literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife.  Winners receive a cash prize, an offer of publication from Ashland Creek Press, and a four-week residency at PLAYA near Summer Lake in the Oregon Outback. Plumes was Mary Heather’s Stonecoast thesis.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, has been acquired by Bedazzled Ink Publishing Company for their B Ink imprint and will be published in summer 2015. That’s two different books next year, for the 10th anniversary of her Stonecoast graduation!

In September, Passages North ran Alexis Paige’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) Stonecoast graduation speech, and later that month she joined Brevity Magazine as assistant editor.

Catherine Schmitt‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) essay “The Coyote Gangs of Hope” is in the current issue of 1966: A Journal of Creative Nonfiction. This piece was improved with the help of Rick Bass and participants in the Summer 2011 nonfiction workshop.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) is the head of programming for Boskone 52, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, which takes place in Boston from February 13-15, 2015. There will be a panel titled “Writers on Writing: Talking Plot with Stonecoast MFA Faculty,” featuring faculty members David Anthony Durham, Theodora Goss, Elizabeth Hand, and James Patrick Kelly—moderated by alumna Allison Hartman Adams. Stonecoast faculty and alumni will also be participating in a variety of other panels, readings, and discussions. Boskone is free to the public on Friday the 13th from 2:00-6:00 p.m., and attending memberships are required after 6:00 p.m. on Friday as well as for the duration of the convention. More information about the convention, programming, and weekend/one-day memberships can be found at www.boskone.org

boskone-52-image

CWIsTypingChristopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) new column, “The Bottle & the Pen: An Exploration through Wine and Literature,” debuted on GrapeCollective on December 26, 2014. You can find the column here.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) book Letters from Limbo has been accepted for publication by CavanKerry Press.

Stonecoasters who wish to meet or reconnect with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will be interested in two Western Massachusetts appearances next month at Bay Path University, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. Ted and Annie will give a reading open to the public free of charge Thursday, February 12, at 7:00 p.m. at Bay Path University. On Saturday, February 14, at Bay Path’s Writers’ Day, Ted Deppe will give a talk on Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous. He will be joined by speakers Charles Coe, on Writing About Those Close to You: The Joys and the Terrors; Bruce DeSilva, on Writing Crime; Penny Guisinger, on Grant Writing; Nell Lake, on How I Went Deep: Writing Intimate Stories About Other People; and Roland Merullo, on The Demons of the Blank Page. For information on registration and fees for Writers’ Day, please write Briana Sitler, at bsiter@baypath.edu

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has completed his long-delayed historical novel about the Spartacus slave rebellion. It’s off to his publisher, Doubleday, for publication sometime in 2016. Also, Redwave Films has renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story for the twelfth year. The producer, Uberto Pasolini, and director, Alan Taylor, seem more confident than ever that this is the year they’ll be able to move the project forward.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has been been named the new vice president of the Horror Writers Association following the death of president Rocky Wood. She has also been invited to the annual Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock Holmes birthday dinner in New York City, which takes place during the first half of the Stonecoast winter residency. She will be signing In the Company of Sherlock Holmes with her NYT bestselling, Edgar-Award-winning editors Leslie Klinger and Laurie King, as well as Pulitzer-Prize winner Michael Dirda. She is also a Juror for the Shirley Jackson Awards and encourages published horror writers to consider asking their publishers to submit their work. Details are on the website.

James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Someday” which originally appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction in April, 2014, has been selected for inclusion in two Best of the Year anthologies: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year Volume 9, edited by Jonathan Strahan from Solaris Books, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction 32, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press.

dezart flyerMichael Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover will run January 30 through February 8 in Palm Springs, CA. On January 22, Mike’s Actual Glass will be performed by The Boiling Point Players, in Houston, TX. Mike did the sound design for The Diary of Anne Frank, running January 9-18 (dates sound familiar?) at The Actors’ Studio of Newburyport, Newburyport, MA.

In 2014, Eléna Rivera‘s (Poetry, Translation) poetry appeared in two new chapbooks: Atmosphered published by Oystercatcher Press, U.K., and Overture published by Metambesen Books. Her poems were also published in the following print and on-line journals: Aethetica Magazine, Creative Writing Annual 2015 Edition, London, UK; Aufgabe 13, Litmus Press; Upstart: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies: Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed; Jacket2, John Taggart feature; The Volta, Trash issue. She has a new book of translation, Parting Movement, Constantly Prevented by Isabelle Baladine Howald, published by Oystercatcher Press, Norfolk, U.K., 2014. She also gave a reading in Paris, France, as part of Thomas Hirschhorn’s art installation, Flamme éternelle, at the Palais de Tokyo.

81---ImageElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to report that her newest novel, We Got Him, will be published in 2016 by New Rivers Press. NRP is currently celebrating its 40th year in publishing and published Elizabeth’s most recent novel, Girl Held In Home.  Excerpts from We Got Him have appeared as stories in Epoch (story cited in Best American Short Stories), Words & Images, and Michigan Quarterly Review (the story was winner of the Lawrence Foundation Prize).  Details and dates for the novel TBA; visit:www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has been named to the board of directors of PEN New England, where she joins fellow boardmember and Stonecoast grad Anthony D’AriesPEN is a worldwide association of writers and all who celebrate literature and defend free expression. PEN New England is a branch of PEN American Center and part of International PEN, the world’s oldest international literary and human rights organization. PEN is headquartered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14): The Literary Reflections department of Literary Mama has recently opened submissions for essays that explore the world of literature—reading, writing, working as a writer—from a mother’s perspective. We seek unique approaches and deep reflection on words and motherhood. Please see our submission guidelines and our archives of past essays. Literary Mama is also hiring several editors and assistant editors. This is a wonderful opportunity to be immersed in the production of a high-quality online literary journal among a team of dynamic and caring literary mamas.

From Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, current):  Call for submissions! Amanda Pleau has been judging a flash fiction competition at MASH Stories. The difference between MASH and most other competitions: no entry fee and they will provide notification of acceptance along with critical feedback and encouragement in almost no time at all. Details at mashstories.com.

 

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