Tag Archives: Sarah Braunstein

Community News & Updates July 2017

THE STONECOAST REUNION


The Stonecoast Reunion is coming up fast, and we’re excited to welcome you to Brunswick, Maine, July 14th-17th!  The weekend will be an exciting time for readings, seminars, and networking with fellow graduates of the program. If you have not done so, please register now! Please visit: http://usm.maine.edu/stonecoastmfa/stonecoast-alumni-0.

If you are not able to attend the reunion’s day events, we’re still delighted to invite you to the evening events, including the alumni reunion reading, welcome reception, and book fair on Friday, July 14th! A professional photographer will be present at the reading and reception, and we’re planning for a group photo. We’d love to have as many alumni as possible participate!

We ask that if you are not registering for the reunion but wish to attend the evening alumni reading and reception (July 14th) or the graduation and dance party (July 15th) that you RSVP here. Family and friends are also welcome, and donations will be accepted at the door for attendees not registered for the reunion.

ALUMS


Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) was pleased to learn his novel The Time Train won the Maine Literary Award in the speculative fiction category.

Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) poem “Pseudopod” will be reprinted in The Were-Traveler’s Mythos Planet Issue.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has reprinted her story “The Executioner” in the special issue People of Color Take over Fantastic Stories of the Imagination Magazine. She also has published a story in FIYAH Magazine called “The Breeze in the Boughs,” which is a fabulist short story about life in gentrifying Brooklyn as well as a bit of a parody of Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willow.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “The Rocket Farmer” can be found in Interzone 271—the magazine’s July/August edition. “The Rocket Farmer” concerns itself with a family of rocket farmers and the ugliness that arises out of their crop’s many failed launches. It’s also about a fourteen-year-old girl who is sick of her mom.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was pleased that her essay “The World in their Hands” was published in issue 3.2 of The Maine Review. She also had a short piece on mountain lingo appear in TrailGroove and an interview with Rad Dad founder, Tomas Moniz, in Literary Mama.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece “Inroads Up Hills” is featured online for Broke-Ass Stuart‘s new fiction series. Incidentally, John workshopped this piece at Stonecoast in Sarah Braunstein‘s Flash Fiction workshop.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has been away on an Amtrak Writer’s Residency from June 22 through July 2. Her trip took her to Chicago, New Orleans, and New York City for research, writing, and revision on her next novel. She is more than grateful to Amtrak for this opportunity for work and adventure.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “Barachois,” is included in the just-released 3 nations Anthology: Native, Canadian, and New England Writers from Resolute Bear Press in both its original French and in an English translation by the author. Barachois is an Acadian word many believe come from the M’iq M’ac language and might best be translated as a delta or the sand bars in the mouth of a tidal tributary. The anthology is available as an electronic publication and a print journal.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction W14) has been busier than expected. After returning from the Stonecoast in Ireland Residency in Howth in January, he began a career change. He’s happy to announce that he’s left social work behind and accepted a position teaching high school English in New Hampshire. June saw the publication of his flash piece “Spindle Talk” at The Future Fire (Cinderella meets Mean Girls meets Narcan). His essay “I Would Fly with Dragons” was released in Invisible 3, and his short story “Tide Child” is forthcoming from On Spec.

During June, Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) moderated the panel “Nurturing the Writer in Your Child or Teenager” at the Maplewood-South Orange (NJ) Book Festival and was on the panel “Nothing But the Truth: A Women’s Perspective on Writing the Memoir” at BooksNJ (Paramus, NJ).

An Elder Man, the new short film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W’07), premieres July 2 at the Walla Walla Movie Crush in Washington State. Further festival screenings will follow later this year.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has an essay, “It Could Happen to You,” in the 2017 issue of City Works Literary Journal. City Works is a publication of San Diego City College.

FACULTY


On Sunday, July 30, 2017, Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be reading in the East Hampton Poetry Marathon Reading at the Marine Museum, Bluff Road, Amagansett, NY. The event starts at 5:00 pm.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) essay on writers in translation, why some make it and others don’t, is in the current issue of Tin House. Read it here. Also, Aaron is thrilled to be participating in TWO readings in support of the anthology Soap Opera Confidential, edited by our very own Stonecoast rock star faculty Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea. The first will be on July 9th at 1:00 p.m. at Politics & Prose Bookstore in DC, along with contributors Kyoko Mori and Shara McCollum. The second will be in Portland, Maine, during the break at the Stonecoast residency, Wednesday, July 12th, at the USM Glickman library on the seventh floor in the University Events Room at 6:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. Come hear Aaron confess about his obsession with Dynasty II: The Colbys, as well as his struggles to learn ballroom dancing…. Finally, Aaron will be teaching a class on food writing at Politics & Prose Bookstore in DC this month, July 18th and 25th. Details are here.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) neo-noir novel Available Dark has been optioned for television as a joint venture between producer Mike Ryan’s Greyshack Films and Votiv Film. She was profiled by The Portland Press Herald for her work on a National Forest Service study on the future of fire management, and for Fire, her new book of fiction and essays (mostly) related to climate change. Hand was a recent guest on The Writer’s Cast and the Eating the Fantastic podcasts. Her recent novel Wylding Hall has just been released in Spain, with foreign rights sold in Russia, and she was named one of the Six Literary Horror Writers You Should Read in an article on Tor.com. Recent reviews include Jeff Vandermeer’s Borne for The Los Angeles Times, and Literary Wonderlands, edited by Laura MillerPeter Beagle’s Summerlong, and Graeme Macrae Burnet’s His Bloody Project: Documents Relating to the Case of Roderick Macrae, all for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will be reading and signing “Look Homeward, Vampire,” her essay on Dark Shadows, with the Soap Opera Confidential crew at 5:00 p.m. on July 12th at Glickman Library in Portland, Maine. She’ll appear at San Diego Comic-Con, working in the Kymera Press booth, #2003, during exhibitor hall hours on Thursday and Friday. This is her additional schedule:

  • Signing a special limited edition issue of her new comic book, Mary Shelley Presents, Thursday, July 20th, from 12:30–2:30 p.m. and Friday, July 2nd, from 3:30–5:30 p.m.
  • Signing at Mysterious Galaxy booth, #1119, on Thursday, July 20th at 5:00 p.m.
  • Panel with other members of the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers Friday, July 21st, 2:00-3:00 p.m., Room 32AB

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and her show Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera were featured in The New York Times article “Tonya Harding: a Tragic Muse?” published on June 13 with a photo from the NYC NYMF production of Tonya & Nancy in the NYT print edition and a reel from the Boston production of the show online at nytimes.com. Elizabeth is writing the book for a new rock opera—Skypaint: A Cyber Rock Opera—with music and lyrics by guitarist Russell Chudnofsky who has toured with Frank Black, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, and more. The show will be performed in October, details TBA; check out the website here.

Stonecoasters and Soap-lovers, join Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) and Elizabeth Searle and All-Star readers Aaron Hamburger, Nancy Holder, Allan Hunter, and Erin Roberts as they read from Soap Opera Confidential (on sale via our own Kelly!) at Glickman Library USM in Portland 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 12th. D.C. soap opera fans: Hear Soap Opera Confidential contributors Aaron Hamburger, Shara McCallum (former Stonecoast faculty member), and Kyoko Mori read from their soapy essays July 9th, 1:00 pm at Politics and Prose. Suzanne discussed Soap Opera Confidential on a radio interview on Pine Valley Radio. The June 28th issue of the national magazine Soaps In Depth features Soap Opera Confidential with a special “giveaway” offer—the issue will available at supermarket or drugstore near you!

 

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Community News & Updates September 2016

ALUMS

Bailey_SoundofWildSnail_pbk_jkt_rgb_HRThe paperback edition of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S‘15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, launches September 6th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Scholarship ($2500 professional development funds) by the Horror Writers Association. She owes her Stonecoast mentors and classmates so very much and is extremely grateful for this honor and opportunity. Her retelling of murderous little-red-riding-hood, “The Scarlet Cloak,” will be reprinted in Burning Willow Press’s Crossroads in the Dark II: Urban Legends anthology this fall and her dark sci-fi novella tribute to Aliens, “Failsafe,” will be reprinted in Manawaker Studio’s Starward Tales II anthology next year. Her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” appeared in Parsec Inc’s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface Triangulationanthology and is now available for purchase.  Her first novel, a historical piratical romantic LGBT adventure, titled Swift for the Sun, is on schedule for a first quarter 2017 release from DSP Publications. She’s also very excited to announce that she’s sold a flash piece titled “Skin as White as Snow as White as Skin” to Gamut neo-noir magazine some ‘coasters may recognize as inspired by her novel-in-progress The Sleeping Boy, which they helped workshop at residency. She’s thrilled to announce the sale of her poem “Lady of Gold” to Remixt Magazine, especially since it was inspired by a drawing of the same title by Jackson Zorn, a fellow contributor to Stonecoast alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art and Words show. Her lesbian zombie puppeteers vs. terminator robots flash fiction “We Are Still Feeling” will appear in a forthcoming science fiction anthology edited by Stonecoast alumni Cynthia Kraack for Calumet Editions. LONG LIVE STONECOAST!

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “A Pinhole of Light”—which concerns itself with ghost hordes, photography, and transformation—is out in the September/October issue of Black Static. On the podcasting front, episode 116 of Far Fetched Fables and episode 438 of StarshipSofa came out this summer. The first podcast features Julie’s narration of Paul Jessups’s story “Sun Sorrow”; the second includes Julie’s reading of Sunil Patel’s “The Attic of Memories.”

Pinhole

Paula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) has been promoting her novel The Drowning Girls (Mira, 2016) and will be appearing on a thriller writing panel with Kimberly McCreight, Catherine McKenzie, and Emily Bleeker at the Mohegan Sun as part of its Winning Author series on September 30. This summer, Paula spoke on a horror/thriller panel called “Sweet Dreams Aren’t Made of These” at Comic Con with writers Jonathon Maberry and Paul Tremblay. She’ll be featured as part of San Francisco’s LitQuake literary festival on October 15. This fall, she accepted a full-time position as a writing lecturer at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

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John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest piece examines post-Olympic depression, and you can read it here. His next book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press in Spring 2017; Bob Costas has written the foreword. John is now putting the finishing touches on his latest crime novel, “The Curiously Confounding Case of Revus Apollo.”

Point Blank by Alan KingAlan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book, Point Blank, which he worked on at Stonecoast with Tim Seibles and Joy Harjo, found a publisher: Silver Birch Press, who will publish it November 2016. Folks can learn more about the book at http://bit.do/PointBlank.

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) is thrilled to announce that Terrapin Books has released  her full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room. For information on ordering or to see a list of places where she will be reading, go to her website: www.jessicadekoninck.com. Cutting RoomShe’d also love to read at a venue near you and welcomes any suggestions.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ’06) is pleased to have her essay “Smoke Signals” published in Guernica.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) will be reading a new as-yet untitled ekphrastic poem as part of Imagistic: 7 Artists, 7 Writers, 7 New Stories, at Hillyer Art Space in Washington, DC, on September 9 at 7:30 p.m. Passehl’s poem is a response to “STC_0002-2 2016-06-08 PFVA” an ethereal infrared photograph of a deer seen in silhouette, by artist Allyson Salomon. The poem interweaves the formal implications of the photograph with imagery, language, and proper names relating to the James River Park area of Virginia, where the photo was taken. In Passehl’s poem, discussion of the meaning, presence or absence of God is bracketed by a brief history of the Charles City County born missionary Lott Cary, and rumination on the fate of the deer. Also: Imagistic is the brainchild of Wales-based writer Carole Burns and artist Paul Edwards, and Passehl participated in a previous Imagistic as a visual artist. This is the first time that she will be one of the featured writers. For more information go the Facebook Event page  or contact Janet at janetpassehl@gmail.com

H is for Hoosier: A State Alphabet, written by Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, W’12has been chosen as the official picture book for Indiana schools during the state’s bicentennial year. The book won a Young Hoosier Book Award. Reynolds has completed The Purple Rose of Chelsea, a history chronicling actor Jeff Daniels’ life and the 25th anniversary of the theater he founded in Chelsea, MI, named for the movie he considers his breakthrough from theater to movies. This book is under consideration for a 2016 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), is pleased that Brevity has accepted a narrative essay for its upcoming special issue on race. (Folks, it took six tries to break into this bucket-list pub!) Lisa’s three linked CNF flash pieces, “Funereal,” appear in Issue 2.2 of Change Seven. In July, Hippocampus Magazine ran her narrative essay “The Amazing Technicolor Horse Dream” in their themed issue on “firsts.” Lisa was recently interviewed on the MFA Director’s Blog for Bay Path University, where she teaches in the all-online, all-CNF program.

Richard Squires (Fiction, S’14) is excited to share that a story of his placed second in the Gemini Magazine 2016 Short Story Contest. In addition to publication in the online journal, he won the $100 prize, which officially makes him a Professional Fiction Writer! Thanks to a number of mentors who helped him with this story: Suzanne Strempek Shea, Rick Bass, and Sarah Braunstein. You can read the story here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Clifford Royal Johns’ (Popular Fiction) storyThe Shooting Gallery will appear as the cover story in the September issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (which publishes monthly).

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction) has a short story, “Wolfy Things,” out in audio fantasy magazine PodCastle. The story was workshopped in Erin’s very first residency (thanks Nancy & co!) and can be either listened to or read online. It is her debut publication and bonus story notes can be found on her website.

FACULTY

Harvard ReviewSarah Braunstein (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has a short story in the current issue of The Harvard Review.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) has three new poems in the online journal Número Cinq. They are included in his new book, Liminal Blue, most easily ordered from Kenny’s Bookshop in Galway, which offers free shipping worldwide.

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Drop City” has just been accepted for publication in a forthcoming Wild Cards mosaic novel, Texas Hold ‘Em, edited by George RR Martin. Publication date is yet to be announced.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Blue Points” will be published in volume five of ImageOutWrite Magazine this fall.

King of Crows IVFor the second time, Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has the honor of having written the best “Worst Play,” a precious adaptation of his literary masterpiece about a drug-addled squirrel and chipmunk in mating season, a 10-minute play so egregious that only one producer in the state of Maine would dare breathe life into it. The play, No One Named Johanna, is only one of a full evening of theatre presented in tasty 10-minute servings that run the gamut from serious drama, to farce, to outrageous comedy, to some that can’t be classified. Each has won the monthly Crowbait Club competition in order to be served up here for you. “King of Crows IV: All Hail The King” will be held at the St Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland, ME, on September 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday Sept 11 at 5:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door or ordered online.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) interviewed on Rob Mclennan’s blog.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will have a six-week run in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, starting November 25, 2016; the run was announced in Broadway World, The Chicago Tribune, and more. The Boston Herald featured an interview with Elizabeth in August about Tonya & Nancy as well as her upcoming novel We Got Him (coming out in November) and the feature film development project on her first novel, A Four-Sided Bed.

Tonya & Nancy

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates January 2016

ALUMS

Catwalk_NewElisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) received a 2016 National Endowment of the Arts fellowship. There were 1,763 submissions this year and 37 fellowships awarded. NEA press release can be viewed here.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to share that Catwalk, the third book in her Animals in Focus Mystery series from Midnight Ink, is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for fiction in the Dog Writers Association of America’s annual writing competition. The first book in her series, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and the second book, The Money Bird, was a finalist last year. Winners will be announced in February.

Blood RegisterPaul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has published “Blood Register,” a short story for the Pillars of Eternity campaign setting. Find it on Obsidian Entertainment’s media/stories page alongside the work of his colleagues.

Nylah Lyman‘s (Poetry, S’10) poem “God and Illness” has been accepted for publication in the winter 2015 issue of Poetry Quarterly.

Susan MacLean, pen Name S.J. MacLean (Fiction, S’06), was awarded First Prize in Fiction in the Briar Cliff Review annual fiction contest. Her fiction has appeared or will appear in Inkwell, Pennsylvania Literary Review, May Day Magazine (New American Press) and several San Francisco newspapers.

Autumn Newman‘s (Poetry, ’09) double-sonnet, “Shopping with Whitney Houston,” has been published by Able Muse in their Winter 2015 issue. You can see a video of her reading the poem on their website. This poem has also been nominated for a Pushcart poetry prize by the editor of Able Muse. 

Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) served as Visiting Artist in October 2015 at Bay Path University, where she spoke with university classes and taught workshops, lectured at Writers’ Day, and was the featured speaker for the Kaleidoscope Series; she will join the Bay Path University writing faculty in January 2016. At the end of October, Alexis presented on a panel (with Summer ’13 CNF alum Penny Guisinger) about the dangers of publishing narrative nonfiction at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ. Her essay “Drunkalogue Diptych” appears in the Fall 2015 issue of The Pinch, and essay “Entropy as Islands as Stars” will be published in the Winter 2016 issue of the New Madrid Journal. Her work has also been accepted into the anthology Second Blooming, forthcoming from Mercer University Press, edited by Susan Cushman. Her essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in March, was nominated by the Sunday Rumpus Essay editors for a Pushcart Prize; this is her second Pushcart nomination.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) had two stories appear in December. Her Stonecoast-workshopped “In the City of Martyrs” appeared on The Toast, and her story “Sleepers,” originally in Interzone, appeared in audio on The Overcast. 

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a story in the January 2016 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, titled “The Singing Bowl.” Another story first published in Asimov’s, “The Redemption of Kip Banjeree,” appears in translation in a recent issue of the Russian science fiction magazine Esli.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jennifer Castello (Popular Fiction), Marian Rosarum (Popular Fiction, S’15), and Theodora Goss (Faculty) have had a panel accepted to the upcoming International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. This cross-genre panel is titled: “The Wonder Piece in Alternate History: Using Fantastical and Scientific Elements to Highlight the Past, Present, and Future.” M.W. Bychowski from George Washington University will also be appearing on this panel. They will present in Orlando, FL, in mid-March.

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FACULTY

Sarah Braunstein‘s (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) essay “Night of the Moose” is forthcoming in The Sun magazine (February 2016). In January, she will teach at the National YoungArts Foundation in Miami.

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was a literary Guest of Honor at Comic-Con Portugal in early December. The film option for Gabriel’s Story has been renewed (for the thirteenth time!) by Redwave Films, and Pride of Carthage has gone into its second option period with Sonar Entertainment. They’re hoping to develop it as a television miniseries.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching a four-week class titled “Becoming a Better Writer: Revising and Rewriting” at legendary DC bookstore Politics and Prose this coming February. His short story “Loo Rolls” is a finalist in the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival Contest. As a finalist, the story will be published in an anthology published by Bold Strokes Books. To learn more about this international festival of LGBT literature, which takes place April 1-3 in New Orleans, see www.sasfest.org.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be a guest (and the only U.S. writer!) at the 2016 Crimetime Gotland literary festival, Sweden’s celebration of Nordic Noir. She’s just been announced as guest of honor at the 2017 World Horror Convention, along with George R. R. Martin and Peter Crowther. Recent work includes a Washington Post piece on writing novelizations, a Los Angeles Times review of the iconic Finnish writer Leena Krohn, and a column on tribute anthologies to Octavia Butler and Samuel R. Delany for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will be a guest at Gallifrey One: Station 27, the 27th Annual North American Dr. Who Convention. Gallifrey will be held February 12-14 at the Marriott Los Angeles International Airport Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. She will be teaching “Finding the Scary” (Workshop #15) at Horror University, which takes place during the 2016 Horror Writers Association StokerCon™ May 12-15 at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas. Nancy has accepted an invitation to be a keynote speaker at the Spokane Film and Literary Convention (“Connecting Writers with Hollywood”) in Spokane, WA, next September 8-10. She has also accepted an invitation to preside over the Horror Writers Association 2017 StokerCon™ as Toastmistress  in April 2017 aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA; guests will include George R.R. Martin.

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51Px4GD+sML._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_Upcoming on January 12:  Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) massive (700 page!) career retrospective collection from Centipede Press.  This is a limited edition aimed at book collectors in the Masters of Science Fiction series, which has honored some of the greats of the genre.  It’s called (surprise) James Patrick Kelly: Masters of Science Fiction. Jim is the first living author to be chosen for this series.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 20-minute play Sully’s Gone will be part of “Evening Broadcasts” (think Twilight Zone), which will run Jan 22-Feb 7 at The Players’ Ring Theatre, in Portsmouth, NH. Reservations are encouraged.

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StonecoastRElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) have signed on bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard and soap star Cady McClain, a two-time Daytime Emmy winner, for their forthcoming 2017 anthology on Soap Operas. The book will also include a poem by the current lead star of The Bold and The Beautiful, Thorsten Kaye, as well as an essay by Stonecoast’s own star poet and author Ted Deppe. Elizabeth and Suzanne are also happy to have work together in the new December 2015 issue of The Stonecoast Review.

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Community News & Updates April 2015

ALUMNI

Stone Dove” by Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) was featured in Crossed Genres.

Stonecoast poetry alum Kathleen Cerveny (S ‘14) will be having her Farewell Poetry Reading as Poet Laureate of Cleveland Heights on Saturday, April 18th. Reading with her will be her Stonecoast mentor Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry). The event will be held at 7:30 pm in the Heights Arts Gallery at 2175 Lee Road, Cleveland Heights, OH. If any Stonecoasters are in the area, it would be great to see you; more information can be found here.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) two poems “Sea Stars” and “Wind Turbines of Altamont Pass” have been accepted for publication in the next issue of About Place journal. The theme: primal paradox.

51wCwMNG6+L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) is a Foreword Reviews2014 INDIEFAB Book of the Year Award Finalist.

Jeanette Lynes (Poetry/Fiction, ’05) co-edited a book, Where the Nights are Twice as Long: Love Letters of Canadian Poets, with David Eso. The book, featuring over 100 poets, was published this February by Goose Lane Editions.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’12) is currently celebrating (with co-editor Annie Finch) the release of Measure for Measure, a new Everyman/Random House anthology of poetic meters. Order yours today! Alexandra will be reading as part of the Tree Series, one of Canada’s longest running literary events, in Ottawa on April 14th.

The Future FireSean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share two publications. “Rustsong” appeared in The Future Fire in March. Check it out. It has illustrations! His story (inspired at Stonecoast) “Beatification of the Second Fall” will appear in Apex Magazine on April 7th.

Not Quite Meet-Cute,” a nonfiction piece by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), appears in the current issue of Blue Lyra Review. Lisa will be on a panel at the ASJA (American Society of Journalists and Authors) Conference in New York City on May 2. And in other very exciting news, she will be published in the upcoming print issue (#55) of Creative Nonfiction Magazine — well, 130 characters of hers will be anyway (a #CNFtweet).

Damien Shuck‘s (Poetry, ’09) collection of poetry, The Drowning Room, will be released soon and preorder is available on Amazon or at New American Press.

519YdnGmWIL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_On April 6, Patricia Smith (Poetry, S’08) will officially receive the 2014 Rebekah Bobbitt Poetry Prize in a ceremony at the Library of Congress. The $10,00 prize is given to the author of the best poetry book published in the United States in the previous two years. The book chosen was Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah, which also won the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) is pleased to announce that his short story “Fishes and Time” was published in Story magazine in March 2015.

STUDENTS

Olive Sullivan’s (Poetry) latest poem, “Pin Oak,” is online as part of the “Where I Live” photo and poetry series by Silver Birch Press.

FACULTY

2015_03_16-400Sarah Braunstein‘s (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) short story “All You Have to Do” was published in the March 16 issue of The New Yorker.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Secret of Mexican Wine Cookies” will appear this month in The Chicago Tribune, in their Printer’s Row literary journal.  Also, Aaron will be teaching at the Peripatetic Writing Workshop in Woodstock, NY, this summer, a great way to gear up for Stonecoast!

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be the keynote speaker at Newman University’s sixteenth annual Literary Festival in Wichita, speaking on science and literature. This fall, she will join the faculty at Maine College of Art (MECA), teaching a class in fiction writing (she’ll continue at Stonecoast). Forthcoming reviews include new works by Kelly Link, Eleanor Arnason, and John Connolly, in her column for Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine.

1250064422.01._SCLZZZZZZZ_SL400_James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Someday” (also known as “The Little Story That Could”) has been selected for another Year’s Best collection, this one being The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy, 2015 Edition edited by Rich Horton from Prime Books. Originally published in Asimov’s Science Fiction May 2014, it has also been selected to be reprinted in The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year Volume 9, edited by Jonathan Strahan from Solaris Books, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction 32, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press. Those who were at the Winter 2015 residency may recall this story from Jim’s faculty reading.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will be performing in an event at AWP in Minneapolis on Friday April 10th, at 4:30 p.m. (along with SCers Suzanne Strempek Shea and alums Matthew Quinn Martin and Libby Cudmore). She will also be doing a seminar with author Lise Haines at the Boston Writers’ Conference, The Muse And The Marketplace, May 1-3. Elizabeth and Lise’s seminar is called “On Love And Safety, Violence And The Horrific.” In it, Elizabeth with read an excerpt from her upcoming novel, We Got Him (2016), which takes place the night of the Boston Marathon bombing manhunt. The seminar is Saturday, May 2nd. Along with Elizabeth, MUSE 2015 features authors Alice Hoffman, Jacquelyn Mitchard, Elinor Lipman, Anita Shreve, Steve Almond, and more, plus many prominent agents and editors.  MUSE info may be found here.

 

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Community News & Updates November 2014

ALUMNI

Erin Lyn Bodin (Fiction S’14) published the title essay of her thesis, “Art of Being Light,” in Kindred Magazine‘s Fall 2014 Issue: Gather. Erin is also thrilled to announce that she’s been granted a 2015 A Room of Her Own Foundation Fellowship and will attend the Waves Discussion Series/2015 Retreat: Writing Against the Current. The week long residency will be at Ghost Ranch in New Mexico in August and is facilitated by Fellow of Distinction Maxine Hong Kingston. Inspired by the Retreat’s history of bringing together “a tapestry of women who, together, create a world of possibility for each other,” Erin’s fellowship proposal consisted of her research while at Stonecoast and her graduate presentation: How to Write a Narrative in the Feminine.

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W’12) short story “Aberrant” was published in Spinetingler Magazine.

Libby Cudmore (Popular Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, S’10) is thrilled to announce that her debut novel, tentatively titled No Awkward Goodbyes, has been acquired by Chelsey Emmelhainz at William Morrow for publication in Winter 2016. Additionally, her story “The Redemption of Oren Barry” was named as an Honorable Mention in the Stoneslide Story Contest, and her flash fiction piece “How To Murder Your Friends” took the top prize in the Stoneslide Snap contest.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Ghost Bubbles” is now available in the October issue of the online magazine Bartleby Snopes. It started out as a flash piece written for the 2014 Art & Words Show, curated annually by Stonecoast’s own Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam. If you feel so inclined, you can cast a vote to make it their Story of the Month. Voting is open through the first few days of November.

Erin Enberg‘s (Fiction, W’11) short film Arabel, which she wrote and directed, was an official selection at the New Hampshire Film Festival in October. It is also one of four shorts chosen to open the Cape Ann Film Festival October 30th in Gloucester, MA. Arabel is the screen version of “The Stalag, 1944,” a flash fiction piece set in WWII that was part of her thesis and was published in Stonecoast Lines, Winter 2011.

Scene from Arabel

Scene from Arabel

At the New Hampshire Film Festival: Jayson Lobozzo, producer & DP; Erika Wilson,  actress; and Erin Enberg, writer & director

At the New Hampshire Film Festival: Jayson Lobozzo, producer & DP; Erika Wilson, actress; and Erin Enberg, writer & director

Kendall Giles (Popular Fiction, W’13) has an article about earning his black belt in martial arts, titled “6 Life-Changing Ways Your Black Belt Journey Can Transform You,” published by the health and fitness magazine Breaking Muscle.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W14) was pleased to see two nonfiction pieces appear in print last month. Her essay “Here Be Dragons,” about raising a rock ‘n’ roll son, came out as part of the Motherlode: Essays on Parenting anthology published by KY Story, and her essay/article about hiking with children, “Skinny Big Hill Hard Mountain,” appeared in Issue 18 of TrailGroove magazine.

HazardousMaterial-1Matthew Quinn Martin‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) short story “Hazardous Material” (originally published in Aphelion) is set to be re-released this May by Simon & Schuster/PocketStar as an eBook single. Expanded to novella length and retitled Nightlife: Hazardous Material, this new version has been extensively revised to fit in fully with Martin’s “nightlife universe.” It contains new and previously unpublished material, including an ending that is very different from the original (which will remain available here).

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’12) recently gave an interview with Canadian poet and critic Rob McLennan about her work as co-editor of The Rotary Dial. Check it out at here. While you’re at it, come and visit The Rotary Dial at home—go to http://therotarydial.ca for more details.

The short story “Have You Seen Her?” by Karen Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08) was published in the fiction gallery Phantasmacore.

9780985893460-Perfect.inddGeek Theater: 15 Science Fiction and Fantasy Stage Plays, edited by Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) and Jen Gunnels and featuring a play by James Patrick Kelly (faculty), will be published by Underwords Press on November 4, 2014.

FACULTY

Sarah Braunstein’s (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) essay “Billy” was recently published on The Nervous Breakdown.  She will be on this year’s National Selection Panel for the YoungArts Foundation. On November 12, she will perform a new piece,  “Night of the Moose”—in collaboration with William Giraldi—at the Double Take Reading Series (Apexart, New York City).

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has closed another movie option deal for one of his books. They apparently have him gagged and bound, though, as he’s unable to disclose any details.

In conjunction with DC Reads and the George Washington University, Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) is leading a discussion of Dinaw Mengestu’s novel The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears on November 5 at 7:00 p.m. at the Takoma Park Neighborhood Library.  DC Reads

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) took part in the NAMT (National Alliance for Musical Theater) festival and conference in New York City Oct. 23-26.  Elizabeth’s work has previously been a finalist at NAMT; she attended this year’s festival as a member of the Creative Team of Broadway Consortium, which has been a producer on such Broadway hits as Matilda and Master Class and which directed a 2013 staged reading of Elizabeth’s rock opera.  Watch for news of upcoming performances of Elizabeth’s rock opera at www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

 

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