Tag Archives: Sarah Mack

Community News & Updates October 2020

FACULTY

Cara Hoffman‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) reporting on the uprising in Exarchia, “Dream of No Nation,” was recently published in The Daily Beast. Her long prose poem “Retouch/Switch,” part of Garth Greenwell’s KINK anthology, was recently translated and published in the polish magazine Femme. Her short story “DeChellis” will be published in the forthcoming issue of Bennington Review. Cara’s second novel for children, The Ballad of Tubs Marshfield, will be published in early November and is now available for pre-order.

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) will be among the 20 authors and poets featured at Old Dominion University’s 43rd annual Literary Festival, “Grit and Grace.” The series of virtual programs is free and open to the public October 4-8. Suzanne will read, speak, and do a Q&A October 8 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. EST. More information and links to all events are here.

 

ALUMS

Lindsey Barlow‘s (Popular Fiction, W’19) second novel of the Jack Harper Trilogy—Perish—was published October 13, 2020, by California Coldblood Books, an imprint of Rare Bird Books.

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) can finally reveal that he sold an interactive novel to Choice of Games, which is set in the same Persian space fantasy universe as his Stonecoast thesis. Barring any unforeseen calamities (and there have been plenty of those lately), The Astralchemist’s Apprentice will be released in 2021. Peter also narrated Aimee Ogden’s story “More Than Simple Steel” for the September 24 episode of Escape Pod. You can listen to it here.

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’16) has a dinosaur robot story in the anthology Triangulation: Extinction, which was published by Parsec Ink in August. She also takes a look at giraffes as a critically endangered species in the story “An Authentic Experience,” which also came out in August in the anthology WILD: Uncivilized Tales from Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers.

Ed Boyle’s (Fiction, W’09) story “The Keeper of the Marsh” was recently published in Scarlet Leaf Review.

Kathy Briccetti (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) recorded a two-minute Perspective on San Francisco’s KQED public radio about her experiences working on the 2020 Census. She is currently shopping the novel she began after graduation, a story about an American family set in the tumultuous early months of 1968, an electrifying time of riots, political upheaval, protests, sexual revolution, feminism, and rock and roll.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has a story in this quarter’s Apparition Lit: “The Gorgon’s Epitaphist” will be available to read on October 15. As well, join her on YouTube October 21 for this month’s ephemera reading series. Sarah Pinsker, Waubgeshig Rice, and Khashayar Mohammadi will read works on the theme of “Light.”

Darcy Casey (Fiction, W’19) has a new story in Yemassee‘s monthly spotlight. Her novel-in-progress, Pity-Heart, was long-listed for Retreat West’s Best Opening Page competition in September 2020.

Brenda Cooper‘s (Fiction, S’17) novel The Making War will be out from WordFire Press on October 7th. This the fourth and final book in an award-winning series that begins on a colony planet where six genetically altered children start their lives as spoils of war. Hugo and Nebula award-winning author Nancy Kress said, “The Making War is technologically inventive without ever losing sight of the human heart. A satisfying end to Cooper’s series.”

Anthony D’Aries‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) story “An Honest Pain” was accepted by Flash Fiction Magazine. Anthony also recently signed with the Philip Spitzer Literary Agency for his novel.

Lauren M. Davis (Poetry, S’15) celebrates the publication of her poem “The Flowers You Brought Back from Italy” in Wrath Bearing Tree’s Spring 2021 issue.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce she will be reading alongside Cadwell Turnbull on October 27th at 7:30 p.m. EST as part of the Strange Lights SFF Reading Series. Originally planned to take place at Book Moon, the reading will be a virtual event. Follow the series on Facebook for pre-registration links.

The Lady of the Cliffs, Book Two of The Bury Down Chronicles series by Rebecca Kightlinger (Fiction, W’14), will be released on November 1, 2020, by Rowan Moon.

“The Art of Honorable Grieving” by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) ran in the September 19 Saturday Evening Post. In other news, 40 Thieves on Saipan by Joseph Tachovsky and Cynthiareleased June 2 by Regnery History, has sold out its first run.

Under the name S.M. Mack, Sarah Mack’s (Popular Fiction, S’19) essay “On Bearing Witness in Pat Barker’s The Silence of the Girls was published as part of the Sirens conference 2020 summer essay series. It is an examination of the necessity of sitting with painful realities and connects a book that re-centers the Iliad on Briseis, enslaved and abused by Achilles and Agamemnon, to present-day injustices and crises.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) has a new essay about art, fiction, and life, in the inaugural issue of NOW, the journal of the Hobart Festival of Women Writers. And, for those Stonecoasters interested in politically engaged fiction, Ellen will be part of a panel titled The Personal and the Political: Writing the Social Protest Novel on October 29 at 6:30 pm. The event includes Andrew Altschul, Sanderia Faye, and Tina Egnoski. Details and registration link here.

Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) took a leap into the world of libretto writing! “The Sky Where You Are,” commissioned by An Opera Theatre of Minneapolis and composed by Maria Thompson Corley, is an eleven-minute opera that sheds light on advocacy and domestic violence during quarantine. Written in collaboration with Women’s Advocates of Minnesota, the first domestic violence shelter for women in the U.S., it will premiere nationally October 23rd as part of the Decameron Opera Coalition’s “Tales from a Safe Distance.” Get your tickets here! Jenny is glad for this unexpected return to her musical roots, and excited to explore new ways to be a writer for change in the world.

Lisa Panepinto (Poetry, W’13) has two poems in the new Littoral Books anthology: Enough! Poems of Resistance and Protest.

A new essay, “Notes From the Father Field,” by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), appears in the August issue of Adelaide Literary Magazine (published in New York and Lisbon).

Morgan Talty‘s (Fiction, W ’19) short story “The Blessing Tobacco” has been nominated for Best of the Net 2020 by TriQuarterly. “The Blessing Tobacco” was also featured in Literary Hub: The Best of the Literary Internet. His short story “Food for the Common Cold” will be published in the Fall 2020 Issue of Narrative Magazine.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) flash fiction piece, “After the Boston Marathon Bombing,” was just published in Gemini Magazine.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) began teaching as a Visiting Assistant Professor at James Madison University in Fall 2020. He will also be a guest faculty member in the Antioch MFA Program for their Winter 2020 session.

 

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ICFA 2018

Written by Peter Adrian Behravesh

Stonecoast had a large presence at this year’s International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.

Theodora Goss (Popular Fiction faculty) hosted a roundtable about The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, read from European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, and spoke on a panel discussing the Frankenstein meme.

James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty) moderated a panel on how adaptation transforms narratives.

Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12) spoke on a panel about decolonizing fantastic storytelling.

J.R. Dawson‘s (Popular Fiction, S’16) 10-minute play was performed at the third annual ICFA Flash Play Festival. James Patrick Kelly performed in one of the other plays.

Many students and alumni presented academic papers, including Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18), Kaitlin Branch (Popular Fiction, W’18), Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18), Lew Andrada (Popular Fiction, W’17), Alex Sherman (Popular Fiction, W’17), Kelsey Olesen (Popular Fiction, W’17), Lauren Liebowitz (Popular Fiction, S’16), and Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12).

Other Stonecoasters spotted at the conference include Jasmine Skye (Popular Fiction, W’20), Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction, S’19), AJ Bauers (Popular Fiction, W’17), Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14), Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), and Will Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11).

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates January 2018

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) essay “Biophilia at my Bedside” was just published in the anthology Nature, Love, Medicine. The anthology, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Torrey House Press, includes essays by twenty-three writers including Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jane Hirschfield, and thich Nhat Hanh.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited her story “The Scarlet Cloak” was reprinted in Like A Woman, a domestic violence benefit anthology. Her short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” was published in December’s issue of Gamut Magazine—classmates will recognize this story as inspired by her thesis novel-in-progess The Sleeping Boy. This just in: Factor Four Magazine will be publishing Karen’s science fiction short story “To Infinity and Beyond” in their inaugural issue. With this sale, Karen’s happy to announce she is applying to SFWA. She’s serving as a guest editor for Pseudopod Podcast for March 2018 and hope you all tune in to listen to the five awesome stories she selected (with the associate editing help of fellow ‘coasters Shawna Borman, Erin Roberts, and Cecelia Dockins). Her poem “Fire Lover” will appear in February’s Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, with an accompanying narration. Karen also has been narrating stories by others. Karen has created a recording of Penelope Evans’ “Wasps Make Honey” for a forthcoming episode of Escape Pod and Evan Dicken’s “The Taking Tree” for Pseudopod.

Illustration for Karen’s story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow”

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) puts her memories of being a bookseller to use in a flash fiction story for the anthology Welcome to Dystopia edited by Gordon Van Gelder from OR Books. (Shh, most of the story I didn’t have to make up!)

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Re-stitched” can be found in the January edition of Split Lip magazine. “Re-stitched” is about two sisters, Alicia and Stephanie, their family dysfunction, and the impurity of human flesh. It’s about as creepy as you’d expect…

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) Terri’s poem, “Violet Green Swallows” was published in Young Raven’s Review, Issue 6. Her poem “Cow Tipping Tuesday” will be published in the 2018 San Diego Poetry Annual and her haiku in the Spring Issue of The Fourth River.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry, W’08) received the 2017 Oregon Book Award for Drama for her play Words That Burn. The play dramatizes the WWII experiences of conscientious-objector William Stafford, Japanese-American internee Lawson Inada, and Chicano Marine Guy Gabaldón in their own words. The play premiered at Milagro Theatre in Portland, Oregon, in September of 2014 in commemoration of the William Stafford Centennial, Hispanic Heritage Month, and the 70th anniversary of the rescindment of Executive Order 9066 (incarcerating Japanese-Americans). Words That Burn was also produced in 2017 at the Merc Playhouse in Twisp, Washington, and the Linkville Playhouse in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Alan King’s (Poetry, W’13) Point Blank was reviewed in The Washington City Paper, Auburn Avenue, and Run Tell That Magazine.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) third collection of short fiction tinged with crime and the supernatural, Acres of Perhaps, will be appearing in April 2018. It is available now for preorder from Lethe Press if you would like to support the small press.

Carolyn O’Doherty‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) debut novel, Rewind, will be released April 10, 2018. The novel, published by Boyds Mills Press, tells the story of a group of teenagers with the ability to freeze time. The sequel will be published in Spring 2019.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’12) recently attended Continuum Music’s Urgent Voices multimedia performance in Toronto, featuring the debut of From the Diaries of William Lyon Mackenzie King, an operatic work for which she write the libretto. The Birmingham-based composer, Scott Wilson, was also in attendance. The Canada Council for the Arts has provided Oliver, Wilson, and Continuum director Ryan Scott with funding to develop the project.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) play Radio Silent has won the 2017 Meeting House Theatre Arts Lab’s annual new play contest and will receive a staged reading on January 20 at Schoodic Arts for All in Winterport, Maine. Pratt also won the award last year for his play The King of France. Several of his plays are among those being considered for full production next spring.

In addition to winning one of the South Carolina State Poetry Society contests, Steve Rhodes’s (Poetry, W’11) poem “Inheritance” won First Prize in Still: The Journal’s annual poetry contest.  He and his wife, Ann, moved to Charleston, South Carolina, three years ago. Steve recently completed his third poetry collection, What You Don’t See, and is looking for a publisher. He is currently working on a prose and poetry memoir. This past summer and fall he was invited to give poetry readings as part of hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park led by the singer/song-writer Doug Peters. Great fun.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) poem “Thirteen Ways of Killing the Captain’s Son” was published in Selkie Zine, issue 5. You can find it here.

Kathleen Saville (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has been invited as a speaker to the Match 2018 Virginia Festival of the Book to share her memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey, published by Skyhorse/Arcade Publishing in February 2017. Information on how to attend the Festival is here.

Olive L. Sullivan‘s (Fiction/Poetry, S’15) poetry collection Wandering Bone is now available on Amazon or directly from the publisher, Meadowlark Books. Several of the poems in this book were written as part of her second semester project with Jeanne Marie Beaumount.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) has three poems—“Memory of Museum of Memory,” “How to Remember,” and “The Morning After”—in the current issue of Blackbird. Her poem “Death Spends Halloween at the Country Bar” was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Escape into Life, where her work was featured in July. And her short story “High Side” appeared in Five on the Fifth earlier this year; this was her first fiction publication.

Marco Wilkinson’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay, “Hidden Light, Wooden Ladder, Bucket of Clay, Pillar of Water,” will appear in issue four of the Bennington Review. His nonfiction manuscript, Madder, was the first runner-up in the 2017 Red Hen Press Non-Fiction Prize, judged by Mark Doty.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) was published in Vol. VI of The New Guard. “Dearest Mum” is part of The Dream Letters, an ongoing feature of the journal. Wilson’s fictional letter is excerpted from a novel-in-progress based on her great-grandmother, an orphan train.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction), publishing under S.M. Mack, won first place for the Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult Writing for her short story “The Carrying Beam.” The story was published online in Hunger Mountain, The VCFA Journal for the Arts, and is available here.

Illustration for Sarah’s story “The Carrying Beam”

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story with Redwave Films, as well as the film/TV option for Pride of Carthage with Sonar Entertainment. His short story “All the Girls Love Michael Stein” will be republished in The Stonecoast Review and was recently published in translation in the Polish SFF magazine Nowa Fantastyka. He’s also signed on as one of the judges for the 2018 World Fantasy Awards. Details here via Locus.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel We Got Him (New Rivers Press) is forthcoming as an AudioBook in 2018, recorded by Stonecoast alum Tanya Eby and her Blunder Woman Productions. Both Elizabeth’s opera and her rock opera about Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan will be produced in early 2018, at the time of the Winter Olympics. In January, the operetta group Mixed Precipitation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will present Tonya and Nancy: The Opera—a one-act opera with libretto by Elizabeth and music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross—on Lake Harriet for the Art Shanties. Meanwhile, in New York City at 54Below on February 13th, Broadway stars sing a concert version of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, a show which will be recorded as a CD from Broadway Records and which has recently received coverage from Playbill and Broadway World (you can read the Broadway World article here). For updates, see: www.elizabethsearle.net

 

 

 

 

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