Tag Archives: Theodora Goss

Community News & Updates November 2018

ALUMS

Edible Queens, one of 85 “Edible” magazines across the US and Canada, has made Jillian Abbott’s (Fiction, S’04) popular (almost 16K followers) Instagram blog into a column. The blog explores migration, memory, and what the Welsh call Hiraeth, which means “homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past” through food. Read her column on Butterfly Cakes here.

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) book The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is now available in Italian. Marsilio Editore is the publisher for the Italian translation, which launched in late September.

Misconceptions, a musical and part of Allen Baldwin‘s (Scriptwriting, W’17) thesis, will have a three-week run at Footlights Theatre in Falmouth from November 1st through the 17th. Here’s a description: “Penny and Vince have done everything right… so far. Faced with the challenge of infertility, they are now forced to reconsider their relationship and piece together a future that neither of them expected. Misconceptions is an emotional roller-coaster ride through modern relationships and romantic expectations. Irreverent but sincere, honest but hilarious, Misconceptions explores a relationship from the inside-out, as Penny and Vince struggle to stay together, finding their way back to the love that started it all. It’s about what we want from our partners, what we need from our lovers, and how the ugly moments of love can, somehow, bring us closer together.” Tickets available now—see www.thefootlightstheatre.com for more info.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) was interviewed as Assistant Editor with the PseudoPod team on Writing the Rapids. She has also been narrating poetry for Heroic Fantasy Quarterly. Listen to her read Ngo Binh Anh Khoa’s “The Necromancer.” Upcoming: Mary Soon Lee’s “Between Battles.” She’s also been tapped to narrate a short story for HFQ and for Escape Artist’s Cast of Wonders young adult podcast—links forthcoming in a future newsletter. She served as a judge for the Horror Writers Association’s Dark Poetry Scholarship and very much enjoyed reading new poets. All of you should apply for HWA scholarships next year when they open again. Read about them here. She continues to be grateful for Stonecoast, the best decision she ever made.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) will be having not one, but two, launch parties for her hybrid memoir Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, published by Burrow Press, both featuring live “space music.” On Sunday, November 4th from 3:00-6:00 p.m., she will be at Waterfall Arts Gallery in Belfast, Maine, with electronic keyboardist Tom Luther. On Saturday, November 10th, she will be at the Lowndes Shakespeare Theater in Orlando, Florida, starting at 7:00 p.m. The program will include Orlando Poet Laureate Susan Lilley (Poetry, ’08) and Interplanetary Acoustic Team. Linda’s long poem, “Northern Run,” is in the current Maine Review, and her poem “Entering the Abandoned Grain Mill at Dusk” will be part of the anthology Balancing Act 2, the second collection of Maine women poets published by Littoral Books. A review of Space Heart will be forthcoming in Forward Review.

Brenda Cooper (Fiction, S’17) is pleased to announce the November 11th release of a collection of stories set in the science-fictional world of her award-winning series that begins with The Silver Ship and the Sea. The collection, Stories of Fremont’s Children, includes old and new stories by Brenda, and new stories by John Pitts and Danielle Ackley-McPhail. It is published through eSpec Books in collaboration with Futuriter.com.

The hardcover edition of Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) debut collection Uncommon Miracles was released by PS Publishing On October 1st: “A grieving man travels through time via car crash. A family of matriarchs collects recipes for the dead. A woman gains an unexpected child in the midst of a bunny apocalypse. An outcast finds work in a magical slaughterhouse. Julie C. Day’s debut collection is rife with dark and twisted tales made beautiful by her gorgeous prose. Melding aspects of Southern Gothic and fabulism, and utilizing the author’s own scientific background, Day’s carefully rendered settings in these eighteen stories are both delightful and unexpected. Whether set in a uniquely altered version of Florida’s Space Coast or a haunted island off the coast of Maine, each story in this collection carries its own brand of meticulous and captivating weirdness. Yet in the end, it is the desperation of the characters that drives these stories forward and their wild obsessions that carry them through to the end. It is Day’s clear-eyed compassion for the dark recesses of the human heart and her dream-like vision of the physical world that make this collection a standout.”

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’ 14) is thrilled to announce that she has signed a book deal with Eraserhead Press and is one of six in their New Bizarro Authors Series. They will be publishing her novella The Bone Cutters, with a planned release in 2019. A bizarro story about the hell of mental illness, the evil hands of drug addiction, and the horror of psych. hospitals. Are you anxious, suicidal, have some anger issues you need to work on, or maybe you have a drug addiction you need to kick? No worries. Once you’ve checked into this psychiatric hospital, you’ll never be the same. Come, have a visit; stay as long as we need you. If you’re fresh, you’re in for one Hell of a ride once you meet The Bone Cutters.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) is teaching a craft workshop on density at the Sag Harbor Creative Nonfiction Writer’s Conference this November 1st-4th and participating in a panel on publishing. He would like to thank his former mentor Theodora Goss for this workshop’s inspiration as well as everyone who worked on Stonecoast Review‘s Issue No. 9.

Melody Fuller’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) article “Harvest for the World” was published in the October/November 2019 Somm Journal. Here’s an excerpt:

When will there be a harvest for the world?

Today I speak cautiously and write carefully about what is means to be a black woman in white space.  Today I try to make sure I do not offend, demand, scare, dare or call people out for gross conduct, damaging gossip, divisive tactics and for pushing narratives that marginalize, hurt and dismiss those who look like me. I am not doing a good job carrying all of this, while being an industry pioneer who is working to build a table, set agenda and make sure I don’t get loud, pushy or rude.  Well, sometimes being labeled as one or all of those descriptors happens.  Being questioned and judged happens a lot especially when diversity discussions and women’s agendas intersect or are used interchangeably for self-serving and deflective purposes. You know what I mean.

When will there be a harvest for the world?

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be on the following panels at Windycon, a Chicago area SF convention (November 9-11):

  • “Chicago SF Book Club: Discussing Shards of Honor and Barrayar by Bujold” — Saturday, November 10th, 1:00-2:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom H
  • “Streaming Services the New Movie/TV studios” — Sunday, November 11th, 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Lilac C
  • “Modern Prison Break: Our Need to Escape?_ — Sunday, November 11th, 12:00-1:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom H
  • Cliff will also be moderating a section of the Windycon Writers Workshop on Saturday morning.

Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) has had his second full-length poetry collection Teacher/Pizza Guy accepted for publication by Wayne State University Press for their Made in Michigan Series. The poems chronicle the 2016-2017 school year, during which Jeff worked not only as a full-time high school English teacher and the Director of Literary Arts at Ann Arbor’s Teen Center The Neutral Zone, but also a third job as a pizza delivery driver 2-3 nights a week. Look for the release in August or September of 2019!

On October 17th, Alan King (Poetry, W’13) was a featured performer on WPFW 89.3’s “Live @ 5,” which was part of the stations pledge drive. Learn more.

Alan King reading on WPFW 89.3’s “Live @ 5

Orlando Poet Laureate Susan Lilley (Poetry ’08) and former Belfast Poet Laureate Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) will be reading together at the Burrow Press “Functionally Literate” event on November 10th in Orlando. Linda will be launching her new hybrid memoir from Burrow, Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, which she started at Stonecoast. Susan’s first full-length poetry collection, The Green Hand of Venus, will be published by Burrow in 2019. They’ll be discussing Poet Laureate life and Satellite Beach, which just happens to be the title of Susan’s first poetry collection and the town where Linda grew up.

Tom MacDonald’s (Fiction, W’09) fourth crime novel, Murder in the Charlestown Bricks, was released October 1st, 2018. This is the fourth book in the Dermot Sparhawk Crime Novel Series. Private investigator Dermot Sparhawk is taking on cases no one else will touch. Born and raised in the Charlestown projects in Boston, Sparhawk fights for the underdog. He calls on his connections and physical skills to keep him from getting killed. He visits Charlestown’s waterfront gill mills and AA halls and travels the Historic Route 66 in search of the truth. And the truth almost kills him.

Catharine H. Murray’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) debut memoir Now You See the Sky will be released in November. On November 7th at 7:00 p.m., Print: A Bookstore (273 Congress Street in Portland) will host the release party. This is the launch book for Gracie Belle, Anne Hood’s imprint with Akashic Books that will focus on topics of Grief and Loss. Kirkus Reviews writes, “Murray’s lucid meditations and living-in-the-moment attitude serve as useful reminders to all of us that life is precious and fleeting and must be enjoyed to the fullest. It’s a simple message but an important one. As much a eulogy as a testament to the joy of life, the book is a heartwarming tale of dealing with life-altering loss. A tender, love-filled story of how one woman dealt with the loss of a young child.” On November 9th, Catharine will be reading with other local authors at Quiet City Books, 97 Lisbon St. in Lewiston at 6:00 p.m. And on November 15th, Murray discusses Now You See the Sky with imprint curator Ann Hood at Books on the Square, 471 Angell Street at 7:00 p.m. This is a Providence launch event for Murray’s memoir.

Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will read “The Office of the Mayor of Miessi,” her piece about living above the Arctic Circle among the wild gold miners of Finland’s Lemmenjoki National Park, on November 2nd at Longfellow Books for the SLICE Magazine Maine launch. The piece, which details part of Jenny’s solo walking journey across Finland in the footsteps of Lappish legend Petronella van der Moer, is currently out in the Fall/Winter “Flight” edition of SLICE, available here.

Lemmenjoki National Park: Pihlajamäki Cabin, the setting of “The Office of the Mayor of Miessi.”

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has been invited to read her poetry at The Harrison in King’s Cross, London, as part of Elbow Room’s celebration of its final issue. The party begins at 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 3rd. If any Stonecoasters are in London, come on down!

The short-story collection The Trash Detail by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) is available for pre order. Booksellers may contact SPD, while individuals may order from their local bookstore, Amazon, or directly from New Rivers Press by sending an email to Nayt Rundquist at www.newriverspress.com. Bruce’s new chapbook Forms and Shades is due out very soon from Clare Songbird Publishing; they may be contacted at claresongbirdspub.com

They Speak Your Language: A Poetic Bestiary, by J. Stephen Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) and illustrated by Amanda Chao Benbassat, is now available at the Amazon Books website. These poems move back forth from the significant to the silly, with drawings of counter-cultural possums to aristocratic cats.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction S ’08) will be at the BookMark Shoppe in Brooklyn, NY on November 15 to read from her memoir, Starting with Goodbye, along with Lindsay Wong, author of The Woo Woo. Lisa’s guest post “Publishing with a Small (Traditional) or University Press: When it Might be Right for You and Your Book,” appears on the website of the Nonfiction Authors Association. Her teleseminar on the topic aired there in October. Recently, the writing department at New Jersey City University hosted Lisa, who read and spoke to students in memoir writing and women’s studies classes. On November 17th, Lisa will present memoir writing tips at the Holmdel, NJ, Barnes & Noble, and also in November, she will make author visits to libraries in Warren, Hillsborough, and Franklin Township, all in NJ. Event details are listed at her site.

Nikki Sambitsky‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’18) creative nonfiction lyric essay “Penny Drop” will be published in the November edition of Longridge Review. Nikki’s essay links her childhood experiences with that of her 7-year old autistic son’s as they share a swing ride on their favorite amusement park attraction, “The Yo-Yo.” “Penny Drop” is part of Nikki’s essay collection “Perseverate, Linger,” which focuses on her triumphs and trials with her husband and two autistic children.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be interviewed at the November 12 LeVar Burton Reads Live event in Dallas, Texas, where LeVar will read her story “In the City of Martyrs.” Her novelette “The Crow Knight” just came out in Beneath Ceaseless Skies‘ anniversary issue. Her short story “Secret Keeper” has been reprinted in Paula Guran’s The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2018.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “Emigrant Song” has been published by Harpur Palate and can be read in the current issue. Additionally, Christopher has just released his 11th album under his musical moniker “Preacher Boy.” The album is called The Rumble Strip and is now available from Coast Road Records. An enhanced lyric book has been published as a companion to the album, and the collection includes the book-length poem “I-80 Blues: 96 Choruses.” It is available for Kindle, or via the Preacher Boy website as a free PDF download.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) poem “Yet” from Letters from Limbo has been made into a short video, which is available on YouTube and can also be viewed on her website.

Tom Coash‘s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) award-winning, full-length play, Veils, will open at Macha Theatre Works in Seattle, WA, on November 30th and run through December 16th. His short play Raghead will be produced by the Black Cat Theatre Company as part of their “Millennials #Offended” festival at the Pleasance Theatre in London on December 19th.

John Florio (Fiction, Pop Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Young Adult) writes about the intersection of race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, “In a Year of Assassinations, an Angry Bob Gibson Pitched His Way Into the Record Books,” was an October feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His YA book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight Between Hitler and America, will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in May, 2019.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana is Here is now available for pre-order, either on Amazon or contact your local indie bookstore and tell them to reserve your copy. Release date is May 14, 2019! Also, Aaron gave a talk at the Library of Congress based on his article “Seven Layers of Heaven: How to Make a Jewish Bakery Classic at Home” from Tablet Magazine. His cake, created from his own original recipe, was served and enjoyed by all!

Aaron Hamburger’s talk at the Library of Congress on Seven Layers of Heaven.

Seven Layers of Heaven

On November 1st at 7:00 p.m., Amanda Johnston (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) reads with Dante Micheaux and L. Lamar Wilson in celebration of Stonecoast alum Quenton Baker‘s (Poetry, S’12) exhibit Ballast at the Frye Museum in Seattle, WA. Then on November 2nd at 7:00 p.m., she’ll read with Dante Micheaux, L. Lamar Wilson, Anastacia-Renee and Quenton Baker for A Writers Showcase featuring Cave Canem Poets at the Hugo House in Seattle, WA. And on November 3rd at 10:00 a.m., Amanda’s writing workshop Writing Public Tragedies will be at the Hugo House in Seattle, WA (registration required).

Ballast

Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) was invited to perform a set of Bob Dylan songs at the Twin Cities Book Festival on October 13, 2018 to celebrate the publication of the anthology, Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Bob Dylan, edited by Thom Tammaro and Alan R. Davis (New Rivers Press, 2018). Marquart’s poem, “Dylan’s Lost Years,” is one of the 100 poems included in the anthology. Her poem, “Come November,” was published by Terrain.org: A Journal of Built + Natural Environments for the “Letter to America” series. 28 October 2018. Debra’s essay “Buried Voices,” published as a Story of the Week by Narrative Magazine on June 7, 2018, was selected by Narrative Magazine for a “Top Five Stories of 2017-2018” commendations. Stonecoast fiction writer Morgan Talty was also selected by Narrative for “Top Five Stories” honors! Her micro-essay, “Some Things About That Day,” was anthologized in Short-Form Creative Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology, edited by H.K. Hummel and Stephanie Lenox for Bloomsbury Press, 2018. Also, she delivered a plenary poetry reading entitled “True North” at the Luther College Writers Festival, September 27-28, 2018, in Decorah, Iowa.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) new CD—Tonya & Nancy: Highlights from the Rock Opera, produced and released by Broadway Records—has drawn strong reviews on Broadway World (“Tonya & Nancy Gets High Marks”) and on Broadway to Vegas, which called the CD in its review “stunningly awesome” and wrote of Elizabeth’s narrative: “The script covers a lot of territory and does so with the artistic skill of an Olympic champion.” The CD can be purchased from Grammy-winning Broadway Records. Updates and more info: http://www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

Two readings from late Stonecoast alum Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo’s novel The Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda will be held in New England early this month. Ann Hood, Elizabeth Searle, and Suzanne Strempek Shea, all of whom mentored Elisabeth, a member of the program’s inaugural class, will read from the book at 7:00 p.m. on November 1st at An Unlikely Story in Plainville, MA. Suzanne will join Beth’s friends, fellow alums, and fellow Maine authors Morgan Callan Rogers and Jaed Coffin in a reading at 9:00 p.m. on November 5 at LFK in Portland, ME. Here’s a recent Portland Press-Herald story on Beth and her book. Suzanne will be reading from Idol Talk:  Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations that Changed Their Lives with fellow faculty member Elizabeth Searle, and fellow Idol Talk contributors Caitlin McCarthy and Lisa Borders November 3rd at 2:00 p.m. at Worcester, MA, Public Library. Elizabeth and Stonecoast alum Tammy Wilson co-edited this major book on major crushes, which has been one of the Top Ten Bestsellers on publisher McFarland’s long list of pop culture books every month since July. There’ll be a special appearance at this event by and idol-themed tunes from Stonecoast’s personal DJ, DJJH.

Suzanne Strempek Shea, Elizabeth Searle and Jaed Coffin at the Portland Book Launch for The Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda by beloved Stonecoast alum Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The final 2018 event in the Local Writers Read series will be held on Friday, November 9th, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Quiet City Books in Lewiston, Maine. Offering multi-genre work organized around the theme of Order/Chaos, the list of readers includes four Stonecoast alumni: Nancy Brown (Fiction, S’08), Josh Gauthier (Popular Fiction, S’17), Catharine Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17), and Bill Stauffer (Fiction, W’17). Celebrating writing and community, the event is free and open to the public. Full details can be found on the Facebook event page.

Stonecoast MFA faculty member Elizabeth Hand will be the Guest of Honor at Boskone 56, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention. Boskone takes place in Boston, MA, from February 15-17, 2019, at the Westin Waterfront Hotel. In addition to Liz Hand, Boskone will also feature several Stonecoast faculty members, students, and alumni on the programme, including James Patrick Kelly, Theodora Goss, Robert Redick, Julie C. Day, Erin Roberts, and Erin Underwood. There will be a Stonecoast Community gathering and programming at the con. Memberships are required to attend, and more information is available online at www.boskone.org.

 

 

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Community News & Updates April 2018

ANNOUNCEMENTS

On April 13th from 6:00-8:00 p.m., Quiet City Books in Lewiston, Maine, will host “Between Fear and Hope: Readings from Local Writers.” Among the readers are Stonecoast alum Josh Gauthier (Popular Fiction, S’17), and graduating students Meredith MacEachern (Popular Fiction) and Anthony Marvullo (Creative Nonfiction). The event is free and open to the public. See the Facebook event here.

Stonecoast MFA has created a new scholarship aimed at supporting writers who use their work to effect positive social change. This April, Stonecoast launches One Month, One Voice: a call to action for our community to get creative, make your voice heard, and help fund the Writing for Social Justice Scholarship. We need your help! Join the movement by hosting an event, donating to the cause, or helping us spread the word. Visit our fundraising page for more information.

RECENT CONFERENCE ROUND-UPS

Check out reports and photos from the recent AWP and ICFA conferences!

ALUMS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) received the Walter James Miller Memorial Award for Student Scholarship in the International Fantastic at the 39th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts for his essay, “The Vault of Heaven: Science Fiction’s Perso-Arabic Origins.” He originally wrote this essay for his third semester project at Stonecoast, under the mentorship of Theodora Goss, and he will present a condensed version of it at Worldcon 76.

Peter Adrian Behravesh and Theodora Goss. Photo taken taken by AJ Bauers (Popular Fiction, W’17)

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is happy her poem “Fire Lover” is now available for reading in February’s Heroic Fantasy Quarterly (Karen’s audio narration is also available at that link). In March, she presented on panels at Stokercon (Writing Fiction vs Writing Games, Shirley Jackson, Call of Cthulhu RPG, Dark Poetry, Horror Gaming, and Edit Your Way Past the Slush Pile which she also moderated) and had a blast hanging out with other Stonecoasters. She will very soon be narrating books for the Stoker-winning Independent Legions Publishing. Her book Swift for the Sun is both an Eric Hoffer da Vinci award (best cover) finalist and an Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) Benjamin Frankin Award for best LGBT title gold or silver metal finalist. Her scifi flash fiction about divorce, “From Now Until Infinity,” appeared in the first issue of Factor Four Magazine, the only story that’s a free read for that issue. She is extremely proud of being March’s guest editor on Pseudopod and hopes you check out the five awesome dark scifi and fantasy stories she selected. Two of her 2017 poems, “Syncing Minefields” (Strange Horizons) and “Save Our Souls” (Silver Blade Magazine), have been nominated for the Rhysling award by members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association. Last, but not least, she can be heard narrating an extremely inappropriate story titled “A Little Song, A Little Dance, A Little Apocalypse Down Your Pants” by Robert Jeschonek on StarShipSofa. It is the first time she’s ever narrated for orgasmic soup. Thanks for all your support!

Ryan Brod (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) has two features out in outdoor magazines this season. His first-person account of fly fishing smallmouth on the Androscoggin can be found in the spring issue of The Drake magazine, and the current issue of Gray’s Sporting Journal features Ryan’s article “Ten-Year Tarpon,” which was part of his thesis at Stonecoast.

Linda Buckmaster‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) essay “Security Clearance,” which first appeared in Burrow Literary Review, is included in an anthology from University of Florida Press, In Season. Stories of Discovery, Loss, Home, and Places In Between.

Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) will lead a memoir workshop for the Cape Cod Writers Center on April 14th. More info can be found here.

Kristin LaTour (Poetry, S’07) is again doing her Poem-a-Thon fundraiser during April, National Poetry Month. Sponsors get a newly written draft poem every day in April. This year she’s raising money for Welcoming America, a non-profit that works within US communities to partner immigrants and refugees with people who are already established in those areas. More information is available about the fundraiser and Welcoming America on her fundraising page.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold an excerpt of an unpublished novel to Analog Science Fiction And Fact, called “Full Metal Mother.”

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) MFA thesis story “Anmol, Pasha, and the Ghost” has been published in Issue 21 of New Haven Review. You can read it here.

Shannon Ratliff’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) essay “Waller Creek” appears in the Spring ’18 issue of Hotel Amerika, currently out.

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction, W ’18) bayou horror story “Snake Season,” which she read from in her graduate reading, is in the April issue of The Dark and available for free online here, with story notes here. If you’d like to check out her next reading, she’ll be joining fellow Stonecoaster Golden Baker for the kick-off of a new Harlem Speculative Fiction Reading Series on the evening of April 9th at local venue Silvana—more info here.

Michaela Roessner (Popular Fiction, S’08) will be a keynote speaker and presenter at the 2018 Writing the Rockies conference at Western State Colorado University in Gunnison, CO, July 18 – 22. And her short story “It’s a Wonderful Life” will be included in the upcoming reprint anthology Making History: Classic Alternate History Stories, published by New Word City Publishers, Inc.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S ’08), will lead a day-long memoir workshop as part of Writing in the Pines at Stockton University in Galloway, NJ on April 14. She will be presenting on Sunday, April 15, at Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day (Longmeadow, MA) on “Publishing: the Long and Short of It.” Her micro essay, “Hope is a Voice,” will appear in the spring print issue of Tiferet Journal, and a longer essay, “Getting Something to Grow Somewhere” will show up in the next print issue of GreenPrints Magazine. Lisa was recently interviewed by Proximity, and by Cleaver Magazine (in which she quotes two of her Stonecoast mentors).

R. M. Romero‘s (Popular Fiction, S’15) debut novel, The Dollmaker of Kraków, has been awarded the Silver Medal for Older Children’s Literature in the Florida Book Awards and has been named a 2018 Sydney Taylor Notable Book.

Mary Katherine Spain‘s (Fiction, S’16) play Just Saying was selected as a Semi-Finalist in the Maine Playwrights Festival. A dramatic reading of all of the semi-finalists’ plays will be held on April 22nd at 7:00 p.m. at the Mechanics Hall in Portland. For more info, click this link.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Sleeping Beauty’s Daughter” appeared in the online edition of Fairy Tale Review.

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) has an essay featured in the UK’s The Clearing—A Journal of Nature, Landscape and Place. “Shepherd’s Watch” will appear in early April.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) has a new poem published by Typishly. “Aromatics” has additionally been selected as an Editor’s Choice Poem. The piece can be read here.

FACULTY

Tom Coash’s (Scriptwriting) award-winning play Veils is being published by Original Works Publishing.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) essay “Sweetness Mattered,” which he read an excerpt from at the last residency, is out in the new issue of Tin House.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) 2016 novel, Mother Go, an audiobook narrated by January LaVoy and published by Audible, is a finalist for the Audie Award in the Best Original Work category. The Audies will be awarded by the Audio Publishers Association in May. Jim’s 2002 prehistoric fantasy “Luck” has published in Italian as “La storia di Pollice” by Delos Digital, and his 2003 cyberpunk novelette “Bernardo’s House” has been reprinted in an international science fiction showcase Future Fiction, edited by Bill Campbell and Francesco Verso.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Tamra Wilson’s (Fiction, S’11) anthology Idol Talk now has a pub date of June 15 (from McFarland Books) and a cover! It features, among the 44 authors writing about their ‘teen idols,’ an all-star roster of Stonecoasters, including both current and former students and faculty. Co-editor Tammy is an alum herself and author of a story collection, Dining with Robert Redford. She will be returning to Stonecoast in July. The all-star Stonecoast-connected contributors to Idol Talk: Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations that Changed Their Lives: Breena Clarke (Fiction faculty), Emlyn Dornemann, Ann Rosenquist Fee (Fiction, S’08), Lee J. Kahrs, Kate Kastelein, Susan Lilley (Poetry, ’08), Shara McCallum, Lesléa Newman, Morgan Callan Rogers, Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction faculty), Linda Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09), Michelle Soucy (Fiction, S’10), Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11), Darlene Taylor (W’16), and Dolen Perkins-Valdez (Fiction faculty). Check Elizabeth’s website for updates and readings: www.elizabethsearle.net

Meet and hear from Mags Riordan, founder of the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Malawi and subject of Suzanne Strempek Shea’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) book This Is Paradise as she returns to New England to update supporters on big changes including a new clinic for her region’s AIDS/HIV population. Suzanne will do a brief reading from This Is Paradise at each event, and copies of the book, and crafts from Chembe Village, be sold to benefit the clinic. Each date is open to the public free of charge, and free-will offerings gratefully will be accepted.  Dates and locations are:

Suzanne also will be speaking at Bay Path University’s 17th Writers’ Day, Sunday, April 15, at the university’s Ryan Center, 1 Denslow Road, East Longmeadow, Mass. Talks begin at 12:30 p.m., with “Immersion Starts with ‘I,'” in which Jonathan Green (Sex Money Murder: A Story of Crack, Blood and Betrayal) and Suzanne will talk about immersion journalism, their related writing, great books done via that method, and more. The other speakers on the roster are three members of Bay Path’s MFA faculty: Stonecoast alum Lisa Romeo, plus Sophfronia Scott and Karol Jackowski. Registration and fee required. For full information: https://www.baypath.edu/events-calendar/community-events/writers-day/

Among many fond memories from last month, Suzanne is pasting into her scrapbook two photos from a visit to Florida: Stonecoast alum Melanie Brooks’ AWP in Tampa panel “Writing the Pain: Memoirists on Tackling Stories of Trauma,” which included Suzanne, Andre Dubus III, moderator Melanie, Kyoko Mori, and Richard Blanco. Melanie’s four speakers were among the 18 authors she interviewed for her acclaimed 2017 book Writing Hard Stories: Celebrated Memoirists Who Shaped Art from Trauma.

And a photo of Susan Lilley, Stonecoast alumna and Orlando’s first poet laureate, in her element, a.k.a. her inspiring creative writing classroom at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, where Suzanne and husband Tommy Shea spoke to students during the day and gave a public reading at night.

 

 

 

 

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ICFA 2018

Written by Peter Adrian Behravesh

Stonecoast had a large presence at this year’s International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts.

Theodora Goss (Popular Fiction faculty) hosted a roundtable about The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, read from European Travel for the Monstrous Gentlewoman, and spoke on a panel discussing the Frankenstein meme.

James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction faculty) moderated a panel on how adaptation transforms narratives.

Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12) spoke on a panel about decolonizing fantastic storytelling.

J.R. Dawson‘s (Popular Fiction, S’16) 10-minute play was performed at the third annual ICFA Flash Play Festival. James Patrick Kelly performed in one of the other plays.

Many students and alumni presented academic papers, including Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18), Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18), Kaitlin Branch (Popular Fiction, W’18), Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18), Lew Andrada (Popular Fiction, W’17), Alex Sherman (Popular Fiction, W’17), Kelsey Olesen (Popular Fiction, W’17), Lauren Liebowitz (Popular Fiction, S’16), and Lynette James (Popular Fiction, S’12).

Other Stonecoasters spotted at the conference include Jasmine Skye (Popular Fiction, W’20), Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction, S’19), AJ Bauers (Popular Fiction, W’17), Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14), Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13), and Will Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11).

 

 

 

 

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AWP 2018

If anyone has corrections or amendments, please contact Meredith MacEachern.

 

Panels & Readings

Thursday, March 8th, 9:00 AM – 10:15 AM
Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
The Body’s Story: On Writing Narratives of Illness—Porochista Khakpour

Thursday, March 8th, 1:30 PM – 2:45 PM
Florida Salon 4, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor
Second Blooming: Resources for Older Women Writers—Breena Clarke, Ellen Meeropol, and Robin Talbot

Thursday, March 8th, 4:30 PM – 5:45 PM
Florida Salon 1, 2, & 3, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor
Early Formations: Guiding Authentic Young Voices in a Digital Age—Cate Marvin

Thursday, March 8th, 6:30 PM – 7:45 PM
Meeting Room 13, Marriott Waterside
A Reading from Flash Nonfiction Funny—Lisa Romeo 

Friday, March 9th, 10:30 – 11:45
Room 12, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
A Reading from Flash Nonfiction Funny—Suzanne Strempek Shea

Friday, March 9th, 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
Room 18 & 19, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
Political Pivoting: Literary Publishing at the Pace of Politics—Amanda Johnston

Friday, March 9th, 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
Room 14, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
New England Review 40th Anniversary Reading—Cate Marvin

Saturday, March 10th, 9:00 AM – 10:15 AM
Florida Salon 6, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor
Tearing Down Walls: The International Experience in Low-Residency MFA Programs—Robin Talbot

Saturday, March 10th, 9:00 AM – 10:15 AM
Grand Salon B, Marriott Waterside, Second Floor
The Thing Builders: Building Literary Communities That Matter—Amanda Johnston

Saturday, March 10th, 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
Room 5 & 6, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
This Is Scary and Here We Go: Fear in the Driver’s Seat—Porochista Khakpour

Saturday, March 10th, 1:30 – 2:45 PM
Ballroom A, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
Writing the Pain: Memoirists on Tackling Stories of Trauma—Melanie Brooks and Suzanne Strempek Shea

Saturday, March 10th, 1:30 – 2:45
Ballroom D, Tampa Convention Center, First Floor
Monster Cultures—Theodora Goss

Book Signings

 Lisa Romeo will be signing and giving away ARC’s of her forthcoming book, Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss, during the AWP bookfair at: Sweet (table 1109, Thurs 3/8, 3:00-4:00); Under the Gum Tree (table T1732,Fri 3/9, 3:30 – 5); Tiferet Journal (table T1939, Sat 3/10, 11:00 – noon).

Community Events

 There will be an informal gathering of all interested Stonecoast students, faculty, admins, and alumni in the lobby of the hotel. (Time TBA).

 

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Boskone 2018

This year, a number of Stonecoast’s Popular Fiction students, alumni, and faculty are program participants at Boskone, New England’s longest running science fiction convention. Boskone’s full schedule of events is available at www.boskone.org, and the convention takes place February 16-18, 2018 at the Westin Waterfront Hotel in Boston, MA. We will also have a large contingent of people attending who aren’t on the program this year. Closing the convention, we have a Stonecoast Reading to highlight our community members who are attending Boskone. If you are available to join the fun, we’d love to see you there!

FRIDAY

2:00 p.m. (free to public)
Star Wars Mad Libs
Mihku Paul (M), Frank Wu, Laurie Mann, Kaitlin R. Branch, Inanna Arthen
Griffin · 60 min · Game Show
Who doesn’t love a good session of Mad Libs, Boskone style? Join us for a special edition of Star Wars Mad Libs—in which the audience provides the nouns, adverbs, and adjectives for a raucous reading performed by our panel of program participants.

2:00 p.m. (free to public)
Stories Before the Apocalypse
Juliana Spink Mills, James Patrick Kelly (M), Julie C. Day, Alan Gordon, John Chu
Marina 4 · 60 min · Panel
We’re familiar with post-apocalyptic futures, from Max’s desert hellscape to Katniss’s dystopic districts. But what about right before the cataclysm—as doom and destruction loom large? How do people live? How do relationships change as we shift into survival mode? Let’s share our few existing “must-read” favorites, and discuss stories we’d like to see.

4:00 p.m. (free to public)
Japanese Light Novels
Kaitlin R. Branch

Lewis · 60 min · Solo Talk
Some of the most popular Japanese anime has come out of light novels. We’ll discuss what differentiates these novels from SF/fantasy literature from the U.S., run down some of the most popular titles, and explore what makes these books so popular.

4:00 p.m. (free to public)
Big YA
Michael Stearns, Tamora Pierce, Christine Taylor-Butler, Gregory Katsoulis (M), E. Ardell
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
What is Big YA? Well, it’s a term we just made up here at Boskone to talk about the intricacies of writing, editing, and publishing big, long young adult series. What are the challenges associated with writing a series where the characters often don’t age as quickly as their readers? How do you track all the details without dropping threads? And why are these long epic YA series so popular today?

5:00 p.m. (free to public)
Reading by James Patrick Kelly
James Patrick Kelly

Griffin · 30 min · Reading

5:00 p.m. (free to public)
Incorporating Cultures Into Fiction
Beth Meacham (M), Lauren Roy, Mihku Paul, Carlos Hernandez, Erin Roberts
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
In writing, it’s hard to navigate between inclusion and appropriation of a culture or cultural elements. But like it or hate it, people write what they know … or at least what they think they know. Complicating matters, the definitions of these two words are fuzzy for many. So, what is cultural appropriation? How do we incorporate cultures or aspects of cultures without crossing the line?

6:00 p.m.
The Sword in the Stone: A New Beginning for the Arthurian Legends?
Faye Ringel, Elizabeth Bear, E. Ardell, Auston Habershaw, Heather Albano (M)
Marina 2 · 60 min · Panel
First published in 1938 as a stand-alone tale, T. H. White’s The Sword in the Stone departs from older sources to (wonderfully) imagine King Arthur as a boy in Merrie Olde England. What did it bring to now-popular tropes such as shapeshifting, the hidden prince, or the magical education? Later incorporated into the first part of White’s 1958 novel The Once and Future King, it helped spark the musical Camelot. (And, of course, Spamalot.) Would we remember much about King Arthur, his Knights, and their Round Table without these books? How did they influence the wider fantasy genre? Have they been replaced by the stories they inspired?

6:00 p.m.
Folktales Within Poetry
Theodora Goss
(M), Jane Yolen, C. S. E. Cooney, John Chu, Trisha Wooldridge
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
From “The Lady of Shalott” to “Goblin Market” to The Iliad, some quite engaging poems are inspired by folklore, legends, or myths. What other examples can we add — perhaps from non-European poetry? What do folk sources bring that an original story might lack? Our panelists will discuss (and perhaps read) some of their favorites — what are yours?

7:00 p.m.
Name That Legendary Object
Michael Sharrow (M), Jennifer Pelland, Teresa Nielsen Hayden, Frank Wu, Erin Roberts
Marina 2 · 60 min · Game Show
Legendary objects of yore—from various worlds throughout the universe, and from myriad planes of existence—have been gathered together in anticipation of this special Boskone game, for the entertainment and edification of the public. Our expert “historians” compete for the ultimate prize as they seek to identify these awesome articles, which may have once been owned by gods, heroes, villains … or the occasional ancient street sweeper. Audience participation is encouraged: bring your favorite enigmatic items to be identified by our adepts of the interdimensional.

 

SATURDAY

10:00 a.m.
Writing Workshops & MFA Programs Redux
John Chu, Jeanne Cavelos, James Patrick Kelly (M), Teresa Nielsen Hayden, Erin Roberts
Marina 1 · 60 min · Panel
Thinking about attending a writing workshop or an MFA program? Wondering how to pick the one that’s right for you? Once you do: then what? There’s no magic formula to elicit an acceptance letter, but a solid application is a good place to start. Join representatives from various writing programs, and learn how to present the best of what you have to offer to win your place.

11:00 a.m.
Autographing: Jeffrey A. Carver, Theodora Goss, Mary Robinette Kowal, Marshall Ryan Maresca
Mary Robinette Kowal, Jeffrey A. Carver, Marshall Ryan Maresca, Theodora Goss
Galleria · 60 min · Autographing

11:00 a.m.
Alice in Wonderland’s Mad Hatter Hats
Mihku Paul

Galleria · 60 min · Children – DragonsLair
Join artist and author Mihku Paul for a wonder-filled hat making session.

11:00 a.m.
Star Wars: A New Beginning Reawakens Again
Craig Miller, Brianna Wu, Nik Korpon (M), Erin Underwood, Garen Daly
Harbor II · 60 min · Panel
Star Wars: The Last Jedi scored with many, but not all, fans—and broke many, but not all, box office records. Looking back over the SW saga: what’s it all about so far? And looking ahead: will we keep watching after 2019, when Episode IX caps the storyline begun by Luke, Leia, and Han? (Disney, now the franchise owner, says the Wars won’t be over for at least 15 more years.) Whose story do we want to see next? Whom do you ship? What would you skip?

11:00 a.m.
The Rise and Fall (and Rise) of the SF Short Story
James Patrick Kelly
, Paul Di Filippo, Julie C. Day, Suzanne Palmer, Darrell Schweitzer (M)
Marina 2 · 60 min · Panel
Back in the day, the SF/F/H short was the genre’s centerpiece, economically and artistically. Today SF is a novel business. Or is it? There may be more talented short story writers and ready markets around than ever. Let’s trace the importance and popularity of the short form, and consider how short stories might help shape the genre’s future.

11:00 a.m.
CRISPR, Gene Editing, and the Future of Food
David G. Shaw (M), Rajnar Vajra, Kaitlin R. Branch, Kristin Janz, Stacey Berg
Marina 4 · 60 min · Panel
Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) techniques for gene editing are said to find wide application in the food industry, raising the possibility of food that won’t spoil so fast. Or pigs that carry less harmful fat. Such genetically modified organisms (GMOs) carry considerable promise—plus a fat load of questions about possible consequences. Let’s talk about the future of food.

12:00 p.m.
How To Write A 10-Minute Play
James Patrick Kelly

Independence · 60 min · Workshop
Author and playwright James Patrick Kelly shares tips and tricks on how to write a short 10-minute play, covering basic structure issues, character development, and timing. Sign-up is required.

12:00 p.m.
Fan Fiction Is Fun!
Flourish Klink, E. Ardell, Gillian Daniels, M. C. DeMarco, Elise Sacchetti (M)
Marina 4 · 60 min · Panel
Let’s face it: fan fiction is fun. Despite all the good/bad arguments for writing/not writing amateur (or at least, unpaid/unauthorized) fiction about characters from your favorite book/movie/TV show, an extensive/enthusiastic community has grown up around this quirky genre. What is it about fan fiction that we love? (Besides the / (slash) stuff.) Why do we write it/read it? And where can we get some more?

1:00 p.m.
Fractured Fairy Tales
Theodora Goss
, Jack M. Haringa, Dana Cameron (M), J. Kathleen Cheney, Carrie Cuinn
Burroughs · 60 min · Panel
Perhaps the most piquant part of beloved animated TV series The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends (1959–1964) was the dry, sly, wry humor of its “Fractured Fairy Tales” segments. These managed to twist hoary stories into something sparkling new, adding biting satire with just a dash of horror. What’s the charm of these odd little gems? Do kids still watch them? Should they? What else (Shrek) has refreshingly revamped old fairy tales?

2:00 p.m.
Beyond Afrofuturism
William Hayashi (M), Gerald L. Coleman, Kenneth Rogers Jr., E. Ardell
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
Afrofuturism started as by definition an outsider movement. But, like many subgenres of speculative fiction, it has had a direct impact on the development of the larger field. Where is Afrofuturism going? Which authors should we be watching as they branch out into other subgenres? Are Afrofuturistic stories now becoming seen simply as science fiction, fantasy, or horror?

3:00 p.m.
The Scientific Method in SF
Genny Dazzo, Kristin Janz, Justin Key, Kaitlin R. Branch (M), Vincent Docherty
Marina 2 · 60 min · Panel
Scientists abound in science fiction. Do these characters behave like real scientists, the good and the bad? Which authors get it right as they present positive images of scientists, and depict the way they work? The “mad scientist” is a common type in our literature—but is that really the way scientists go wrong?

3:00 p.m.
Non-Genre Fiction That Inspires Us
Tamora Pierce, Alexander Jablokov, Theodora Goss, F. Brett Cox, Kenneth Schneyer (M)
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
We’re always talking about icons such as Mary Shelley, Stephen King, J. R. R. Tolkien, and others who breathed air into our literary lungs—but what about non-genre fiction? Our panelists discuss some of their favorite authors from outside the SF/F/H field, who have inspired them as writers and readers.

4:00 p.m.
Science Guest Interview, Featuring Catherine Asaro
Catherine Asaro, E. Ardell
Harbor II · 60 min · Interview
Come get your geek on with Catherine Asaro, Boskone 55’s Hal Clement Science Speaker. Catherine shares her experiences in theoretical chemical physics, as well as her work as a science teacher, coach for nationally ranked math teams, member of the governmental advisory group SIGMA, and Nebula-award-winning SF author.

5:00 p.m.
Border of the Unknown
Theodora Goss
, Errick Nunnally (M), Trisha Wooldridge, Dana Cameron, Gerald L. Coleman
Marina 1 · 60 min · Panel
Much fine fantastika involves crossing the boundary between the known and the unknown—especially that uneasy border between the village and the trees. Let’s look at the long history of that great unknown, the enchanted forest. Why has it pushed and pulled at people’s imaginations since ancient times? To find out, let’s stroll away from safety and into the woods, as the liminal light fades and the shadows gather all under the boughs unbowed …

5:00 p.m.
Spiritual Animals
Mihku Paul
, Christopher Irvin (M), Tui Sutherland, Beth Meacham, E.J. Stevens
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
Animals in SF/F/H aren’t all just lazy lap dogs or cozy cats. Dæmons and familiars, patronuses and spirit animals—these creatures often play subtly influential roles in the lives of main characters. Why do some animals assume such importance? Have their roles changed over time? Is over-anthropomorphizing a concern? Our panelists discuss our furry, feathered, and scaled friends in all of their glory.

6:30 p.m.
Boskone Book Party
Erin Underwood
(M), Nat Segaloff, Les Johnson, James Patrick Kelly, E. C. Ambrose, Jane Yolen, Robert V.S. Redick, Christopher Paniccia, Kenneth Rogers Jr., Walter H. Hunt, Adam Stemple, Kristy Acevedo, Christopher Irvin, Rob Greene
Galleria – Stage · 60 min · Event
Come join the fun at Boskone 55’s Book Party—and meet the presses and authors who have new books coming out at the con! This is your chance to see what’s new from writers you already love, as well as those you have yet to discover.

8:00 p.m.
Open Mic: Myths & Legends!
Elaine Cunningham (M), Kenneth Schneyer (M), Lauren Roy, C. S. E. Cooney, Carlos Hernandez, Gabriel Erkard, E. Ardell, Benjamin Newman, Roberta Rogow, Don Pizarro, Trisha Wooldridge, Mary Ellen Wessels, Edward L. Stauff
Galleria – Stage · 60 min · Event
Live from Boskone: A special selection of tall tales as told by our program participants—plus audience members. All show off their open mic skills in the third annual Boskone Open Mic extravaganza. This year features the myths and legends of yesterday, today, and tomorrow! Each participant contributes his/her most legendary performance—a 5-minute story, poem, song, skit, interpretive dance, or whatever! OPTIONAL: For extra appeal, feel free to come dressed as your favorite mythic or legendary character.

The Rules: Boskone members are invited to join our participants in the open mic by signing up for one of the six open slots at the door to the event, which opens for sign-ups at 7:30 p.m. Each performer is given a firm 5-minute time limit (max), including setup time. So a quick transition between acts is key. Please no profanity: DragonsLair is within hearing distance.

8:00 p.m.
Saturday Night Special Event: Boskone Awards and Rapid-Fire Theater
Bruce Coville, Gay Ellen Dennett, David G. Grubbs (M), Bob Kuhn, Laurie Mann, Mihku Paul, Michael Sharrow, Jane Yolen, Ginjer Buchanan, Fred Lerner, Tui Sutherland, Jen Gunnels, Erin Roberts, Christine Taylor-Butler, William Hayashi, Nat Segaloff, Daniel M. Kimmel
Harbor II+III · 120 min · Event
Saturday night’s presentation is a fast-paced theatrical extravaganza, featuring a set of mini-shows that resemble live-action podcasts (akin to a science fiction variety show with a short awards ceremony, an interview, a game show, and an original radio show with aliens). This special Saturday night program has something for every fan. Hosted by Boskone’s very own David G. Grubbs.

 

SUNDAY

9:30 a.m.
Flash Fiction Slam
Rob Greene (M), James Patrick Kelly, Shahid Mahmud, Vikki Ciaffone, Jen Gunnels
Marina 4 · 90 min · Reading
Boskone’s Flash Fiction Slam returns! Be one of eleven (10) writers to compete for the title of The Flash, reading your own original fiction—which must tell a complete tale within a 3-minute period. Our expert panel of judges will score your work, and you automatically lose 10 percent for going over your 3-minute time. You may only read your own work. The reader with the top score wins!

Sign up before the con by sending an email to program@boskone.org for one of eight (8) reading slots on a first-come, first-served basis. Or sign up onsite at Program Ops in the Harbor Foyer for one of three (3) at-con openings. A waiting list will also be available.

10:30 a.m.
Reading by Theodora Goss
Theodora Goss

Griffin · 30 min · Reading

12:00 p.m.
Autographing: E. Ardell, John Langan, Christine Taylor-Butler
E. Ardell, John Langan, Christine Taylor-Butler
Galleria · 60 min · Autographing

12:00 p.m.
Stories for Themed Anthologies
Tom Easton, Julia Rios (M), Erin Underwood, Elaine Cunningham, Clarence Young
Harbor III · 60 min · Panel
The growing popularity of themed anthologies is creating new life for short fiction. Editing and writing for these collections, however, can be tricky. How do you find the right stories? To what extent do you edit? And what kind of anthology would we all like to see?

12:00 p.m.
Women Who Write Science Fiction
LJ Cohen, Victoria Sandbrook (M), Catherine Asaro, Erin Roberts, Marianna Martin PhD
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
Mary Shelley, Leigh Brackett, Ursula K. Le Guin, Connie Willis, N. K. Jemisin — women have been in the thick of writing science fiction for a very long time. Let’s discuss some of their landmark publications that captured our imagination. Why do we love these stories? What works should we look for the next time we’re browsing the shelves?

1:00 p.m.
Weird Science and Odd Inventions
James Cambias, John P. Murphy (M), Julie C. Day, David G. Shaw
Marina 2 · 60 min · Panel
Sometimes ideas sound better in your head! Scientific discovery and invention can take strange and unexpected turns when creativity is let loose. Fortunately, some of the end products turn out to be truly remarkable. Our panelists discuss their favorite unusual inventions and surprising scientific discoveries.

1:00 p.m.
Igniting the STEM Literary Movement
Kathleen Cheney, Catherine Asaro, Kaitlin R. Branch, Brenda Noiseux (M), Cady Coleman
Marina 3 · 60 min · Panel
There’s a growing focus in education on bringing more science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) into the classroom. Stories with strong STEM components are being written for children and young adults. But how do we attract younger readers’ attention, and build greater interest in this literature? Participants share their ideas and invite suggestions from the audience.

2:00 p.m.
Group Reading: Stonecoast MFA
James Patrick Kelly
(M), Theodora Goss (M), Julie C. Day, Kaitlin R. Branch, Mihku Paul, E. Ardell
Griffin · 60 min · Reading
Come hear the literary stylings of the Stonecoast MFA alumni, students, and faculty who have come together for this special group reading at Boskone.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates March 2017

2017 STONECOAST ALUMNI REUNION

The submission deadline for readers and presenters for the 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion has been extended to March 15th! Stonecoast celebrates our 15th anniversary this July residency with an alumni reunion July 14th-17th. Readers will be chosen by a small committee through a blind submission process, and will be featured in the residency-wide evening reading on Friday, 7/14. Panelists and seminar leaders will receive free registration to the reunion. To apply for either position, or to register for the reunion, visit http://usm.maine.edu/stonecoastmfa/stonecoast-alumni-0. Any questions can be directed to Jenny O’Connell, Stonecoast Community Outreach Coordinator: jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu. We hope to see you this summer!

ALUMS

9-tales-told-in-the-darkKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled to announce four flash fiction sales: 1000-word original featuring creepy prognosticating dolls called “Eyes That See Everything” in February’s Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s Artemis Rising 3: Return of Hecate; 800-word evil dollhouse reprint “What the Dollhouse Said” forthcoming in Red Lighthouse’s Mrs Rochester’s Attic anthology (Mantle Lane Press); 1200-word alien overlords reprint “Like a Soul,” which originally appeared in the Stonecoast Review’s first issue, will appear in July’s Darkhouse Books’Descansos anthology; and 1500-word tarot murders reprint “The Red Red Rose,” which appeared in Stonecoast Lines and was inspired by faculty Tony Barnstone’s “The Tarot of Creativity” session at the S’12 residency, will appear in Bride of Chaos’s 9 Tales Told in the Dark #21, March 9, 2017. Yay for short disturbing fiction about kids and bullies! Karen also sold an original whimsical poem about a flying girl titled “Essential Elements for a Tea Party” (inspired by alumna Bonnie Stufflebeam) forthcoming in Dreams and Nightmares Magazine #107 September 2017. And, last but not least, Karen’s first novel, an LGBT romantic pirate adventure set in 1822 Caribbean, Swift for the Sun, comes out March 27, 2017, via Dreamspinner Press and is now available for ebook and paperback preorder! Woo hoo!

nhrJulie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) is thrilled to announce she has just signed a contract with PS Publishing for her first short story collection, scheduled for release later this year. The collection, titled Uncommon Miracles, contains eighteen stories, many previously published in fantasy magazines, horror anthologies, or literary journals. Laura Page in The Review Review praised Julie’s work as “startling and elegant,” while Paul Michaels of This Is Horror described it as “[melding] magical realism and southern gothic…to beautiful and immersive effect.” Julie’s novelette “Idle Hands,” which is part of the collection, can also be found in the most recent issue of the New Haven Review. “Idle Hands,” among other things, is a generational story about mothers, daughters, the multiverse, and a family’s unusual addiction.

one-nation-under-baseballJohn Florio (Fiction, Pop Fiction, S’07) is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be released by University of Nebraska Press on April 1. The book covers the intersection of race, politics, social issues, and sports during the turbulent ’60s; Bob Costas wrote the foreword. You can read the Kirkus review here. John is also writing a young adult sports book for Macmillan/Roaring Brook Press.

Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) will be in Moscow until May 11 consulting with development executives and writing staffs on television series in production for Sony Television Russia. His half hour comedy pilot script for the Independent Film Channel, Get Your Shit Together, has been approved by development executives and is now under consideration for a production order. In prose-world terms, the publisher has bought the manuscript and is now deciding when and if to publish.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) alternate disco-and-crime history novelette “Night Fever” will appear in the May/June 2017 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction. It even has a playlist on Spotify (search for “Will Ludwigsen’s Night Fever”) for added atmosphere for the story.

Kelsey Olesen (Popular Fiction, W’017) will be presenting a paper at the International Conference for the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, FL, on March 23, 2017. Her paper, “A Feminist in Disguise: On Cinderella Past and Present,” will be presented as part of the Young Adult and Children’s Division of the conference. Arguing that popular retellings of this infamous fairy tale fail to bring the story into a modern feminist world, Kelsey’s paper will urge listeners to teach and write retellings that retain the original heart of the Cinderella fairy tale to create empowering literature for children and young adults. She is eager to attend ICFA with fellow Stonecoast Winter ’17 graduates Steve Cave and Alex Sherman, as well as her thesis mentors James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss. Kelsey wishes to thank Nancy Holder, her project mentor, for assisting in the conception and creation of the original paper that provided the research and discoveries for this presentation.

Kelsey at presenting on "Damsels Without Distress: Rewriting Fairy Tales for a Modern Audience" at the Stonecoast Winter 2017 residency

Kelsey at presenting on “Damsels Without Distress: Rewriting Fairy Tales for a Modern Audience” at the Stonecoast Winter 2017 residency

David Page, MD (Popular Fiction, W’06), has published a book with Praeger entitled The Laparoscopic Surgery Revolution: Finding a Capable Surgeon in a Rapidly Advancing Field.

a-symphony-of-cowbellsHeather Preusser‘s (Fiction, S’13) debut picture book, A Symphony of Cowbells, will be released March 15, 2017, from Sleeping Bear Press. The story, about a cow who loses her bell and disrupts the harmony of the herd, is illustrated by Eileen Ryan Ewen.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Orangery” is a 2016 Nebula Award finalist in the novelette category.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction) has accepted a position as Editorial Assistant at IDW Publishing, one of the top four comic book publishers in the U.S., renowned for its diverse catalog of licensed and independent titles.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has accepted a tenure-track position in the MFA program at the University of Nevada, Reno. He’ll be moving out there right after the summer residency. Yes, this will be the Durham’s third summer move in a row. When will it end? By the way, David has no plans to leave Stonecoast anytime soon! Thanks to Deb Marquart, he’ll be reading at Iowa State University on March 23rd (his birthday) along with author Benjamin Percy. They will, no doubt, talk about werewolves…

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) and Stacie Whitaker’s initiative to Bury the White House in Books received national and international media attention from The Huffington Post, CNN, and many others, and attracted 3000 followers on Facebook.

soap-opera-confidentialElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) anthology on soap operas is scheduled to be out this spring from McFarland Books: Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow, As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives. Elizabeth is reading from her novel We Got Him on March 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at the Out of the Blue gallery in Cambridge, MA, at the Dire Reading Series and on March 25 at the Falmouth Library on Cape Cod. Interviews about We Got Him are coming up: The Frankie Boyar Show (national radio show; 11:30 a.m. March 16th; live interview), Behind the Pages (Brookline Access TV; broadcast date TBD), Books & Authors (AT&T; broadcast date TBD), Cape Cod’s South Shore radio (April 12: 8:40 a.m.), and ET-WATD-FM “The South Shore’s Morning News” (taped interview). For updates:  www.elizabethsearle.net

Bay Path University’s 15th Writers’ Day, to be held April 2 at the campus in Longmeadow, MA, will feature Stonecoasters Melanie Brooks, who’ll be talking “Writing Hard Stories,” the topic of her highly acclaimed newly published first book, and Mary Heather Noble, who’ll be talking about sources of inspiration for her acclaimed essays on family, nature and current events. The lineup will include inspiration panelist John Sheirer and Dave Stern, and a primer on podcasting by Bernadette Duncan Harrison, a former national talk-show producer and author of Yappy Days, a newly-published memoir of her time in that arm of radio. Find Suzanne Strempek Shea, Bay Path’s writer in residence, at the registration table. She hopes to see you there, and sends this link with schedule and registration information. Suzanne also is looking forward to the week of April 2 as Melanie Brooks will be Bay Path’s visiting writer that week. Melanie’s duties will include giving a talk and reading on Thursday, April 6, at 6:30 p.m., at the university’s Hatch Library. The event is free of charge. Melanie’s Writing Hard Stories will be available for purchase at both Writers’ Day and Melanie’s reading.

 

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Community News & Updates November 2016

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to have been part of the “Fantasy of the American Heartland” (with Rob Howell, Lynne Cantwell, Gary K. Wolfe, and Stephanie Loree) and “Shirley at 100: Marking the Shirley Jackson Centennial” (with Eileen Gunn, Peter Straub, Gordon Van Gelder, and Stephanie Feldman) panels at the World Fantasy Convention October 27-30. Her flash undead-grandmother-farm-guardian story “On Rising One Snowy Evening” will be reprinted in a forthcoming issue of Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores. Karen’s new poem “Broken Tractor Sonnet,” which contains some mighty shocking language for a midwestern farm girl, will appear in Off the Coast: Maine’s International Poetry Journals Fall 2016 issue. Her Japanese theater alien possession micro story “The Things Between Us” will appear in Daily Nightmare’s Quick Shivers in the Midwest anthology. Also, audio of Karen reading her poem “Effects of Moonlight” is up on the child-safe Science Fiction Poetry Association’s 2016 Halloween Poetry Reading website.

uncanny_issue_thirteen_coverJennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has published her story “Kamanti’s Child” along with an interview in the November/December issue of Uncanny Magazine. Also our own Theodora Goss has a poem in this issue as well!

Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) debut novel The Big Rewind (William Morrow, February 2016) was long-listed for the Kirkus Prize. The original starred review called it “A mystery that will inspire more than one playlist and, hopefully, a sequel.”

the-butchers-daughterFlorence Grende‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) book, The Butcher’s Daughter: A Memoir, has just been released by Hamilton Stone Editions and is available through their catalogue at Hamiltonstone.org., at Amazon.com, and at Goodreads.com. A family portrait drawn in lyrical style, it examines the effects of war and its aftermath.

In his capacity as a screenwriter and television producer, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) received a pilot script order from the Independent Film Channel, a dark comedy about family relationships and the afterlife entitled Get Your Shit Together. IFC is one of the AMC (Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead) family of channels and currently broadcasts Portlandia and the documentary parody series Documentary Now! from Seth Myers, starring Bill Hader and Fred Armisen.

on-hurricane-islandEllen Meeropol’s (Fiction, W ’06) second novel, On Hurricane Island, was named a Massachusetts Must Read Book for 2016 by the Massachusetts Center for the Book.

John Christopher Nelson‘s, (Fiction, S’15) short story “Good Friday,” conceived during his residency in Ireland with the Deppes, will be featured in issue VI (summer 2017) of The New Guard. His flash fiction piece “Detumescence” is currently online in issue II of The Matador Review.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her essay “Eulogy for an Owl” won the Editor’s Prize in Creative Nonfiction’s Learning From Nature Issue (Issue #61, available now here). “Eulogy for an Owl” was also selected as a finalist in Bellingham Review’s 2016 Annie Dillard Award for Creative Nonfiction. Mary Heather is also looking forward to presenting at the Moravian College Writers’ Conference on February 3-4, 2017, in which she will discuss “Crossing Boundaries in Nonfiction,” her evolution from a professional environmental scientist into a writer-scientist, and how science and art can enrich one another. Additional information about the 2017 Moravian College Writers’ Conference, featuring Alison Hawthorne Deming as the Keynote Speaker, can be found here.

Jean M. Peck (Fiction, S’08) will be reading from her new book, Blue Girls, on November 15, 7:00 p.m., at Longfellow Books in Portland. The novel was written as a senior thesis at Stonecoast under the watchful eyes of Lesléa Newman, David Anthony Durham, and Suzanne Strempek Shea.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonficiton, S’08) recent guest post at the Brevity blog discussed the steps she took in the writing process to break into Brevity Magazine with an essay in their Fall 2016 special issue on race. A new hat Lisa is wearing now is editing nonfiction craft essays for Cleaver Magazine.

Ashley Warren‘s (Fiction, S’12) short story “Code Gray” has been published in the latest issue of The Examine Life Journal, a literary journal of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.

Requiem in StonesRequiem in Stones, a novel by Richard Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05) has just been published by Maine Authors Publishing Cooperative and is available in local book stores, through Amazon, or by going to http://richardwile.com. Brunswick’s Gulf of Maine Book Store will host a launch and reading on Sunday, December 4, at 3:00 p.m. You might also want to check out Rick’s blog. http://geriatricpilgrim.com

FACULTY

An interview with Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction), conducted at Politics & Prose bookstore, is available here.

we-got-himElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) new novel, We Got Him, will be released by New Rivers Press on November 15th; Elizabeth will have her Book Launch reading and party (all Stonecoasters are invited!) at Newtonville Books in Newton Centre, MA, on November 20th at 2:00 p.m. Then, a week later, Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera opens in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, with Previews November 26 and 27 and Opening Night November 29th. Elizabeth will be at all the November performances; for tickets see Theater Wit.

Soap bubbles are on the horizon! Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) learned this past week that Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune Tomorrow, As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives, will be published in March of 2017 by McFarland Press. They will be planning readings in New England and beyond this spring, and they hope to meet up and read along with many of the writers and soap insiders who penned stories about their own soap-opera fixations.

 

 

 

 

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