Tag Archives: Debra Marquart

Community News & Updates July 2018

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Poetic Voices for Social Justice

Join us at SPACE Gallery on Thursday, July 12th, where Stonecoast MFA faculty member Martín Espada—recent winner of the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, Pulitzer Prize finalist, American Book Award winner and National Book Critics Circle nominee—will give a public reading alongside Lauren Marie Schmidt, author of three collections of poetry including Psalms of The Dining Room—a sequence of poems about her volunteer experience at a soup kitchen. The reading will feature music by current Stonecoast student Julie Cira and will be followed by a community discussion of the artist’s role in the community. All proceeds of this evening will go to benefit the Stonecoast MFA Writing for Social Justice Scholarship, established to reduce financial and social barriers to higher education, and support culturally and socially engaged writers committed to creating positive change in the community. RSVP here!

BIG NEWS for Stonecoast Review—not only does our Summer 2018 Issue No. 9 feature original, never before-printed stories from the award-winning authors James Van Pelt and Rick Wilber, but we’ve received a very generous $2500 donation from USM’s president and provost in support of our future endeavors. The catch with the donation is that we need to raise an equivalent amount of money within the year. Alumni can help out by purchasing a copy of Issue No. 9 through Kelly’s Books To Go—orders should be available by the end of this Summer Residency at the latest. They can also donate to us directly through the “Make a Gift” button and selecting the “Stonecoast MFA Literary Review Fund” as their designation. We intend to use this money to begin paying our contributors semi-professional rates as soon as possible, but in order to sustain a status of even $50 a submission, we’ll need over $2000 every semester. We hope that every alumni will pick up a copy (or three!) of every issue, as the success of our literary journal will help the overall status and prestige of the program. We encourage alumni to submit for Issue No. 10 when we open again in August—our goal is publish a handful of students and alumni with every issue.

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) was a participant in Tina Connolly’s Young-Adult Novel Writing Workshop at the Kansas University Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction in June, funded by her Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Scholarship from the Horror Writers Association. She worked on Sleeping Boy, a novel she started while at Stonecoast. She is excited to be under contract to write RPG tie-in fiction, has been enjoying narrating for the Stoker-Award-winning Independent Legions Press Cemetery Pod podcast, and regularly discusses speculative books, comics, and movies with Alasdair Stuart on the Escape Artists Patreon feed. She will be a moderator and panelist at the GenCon Writer’s Symposium in August, presenting on “Minding your Ps and Qs: Grammar and Punctuation for Authors,” “NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writing Month,” “How Other Creative Outlets Help Writing,” “Writing Micro and Flash Fiction,” and how to “Edit Your way Past the Slush Pile.” If any Stonecoasters will be at GenCon in August she would love to see them, so please email her at karen.bovenmyer@gmail.com to meet up.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has another play opening this month! Adapted from her award-winning audio drama, Six Stories, Told at Night runs at the Toronto Fringe Festival July 5th-15th. She also looks forward to seeing friends and colleagues at Readercon!

Brenda Cooper‘s (Fiction, S’17) newest novel, Keepers, will be release by Prometheus books on July 31st, 2018. Keepers tells the story of two sisters who must support each other in a dangerous future where the cities are huge and the wild lands between empty and lawless. Keepers is the sequel to Wilders, which came out in 2017. Nancy Kress, Hugo- and Nebula award-winning author of If Tomorrow Comes, says that “Keepers shows us an earth that is the result of profound climactic and ecological changes. Nobody is better than Brenda Cooper at creating detailed and innovative futures. Keepers is a gem—a complex and plausible look at what we might face someday, and how we might respond.” The beginning of Keepers came from Brenda’s thesis, and she is grateful to James Patrick Kelley and Nancy Holder for being her first readers.

Lauren M Davis (Poetry, S’15) will be teaching courses in Creative Writing that she designed for the Indiana Institute of Technology in Fall 2018. She has also recently been given the title of Placemaking Coordinator from Big Car of Indianapolis and will work to cultivate arts, culture, outdoor activity, local food sources, and community for Fort Wayne, Indiana’s Electric Works project.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) debut collection Uncommon Miracles is now available for pre-order from PS Publishing. You can preview one of the stories here. Julie was also spotlighted on Tor.com—along with some other fabulous Stonecoasters—as part of  “150 ‘New’ Writers for Your Consideration.”  Here’s the full lowdown on Julie’s collection:

  • A grieving man travels through time via a car crash.
  • A family of matriarchs collects recipes for the dead.
  • A woman gains an unexpected child in the midst of a bunny apocalypse.
  • An outcast finds work in a magical slaughterhouse.

Whether set in a uniquely altered version of Florida’s Space Coast or a haunted island off the coast of Maine, each of the eighteen stories in this collection carries its own brand of meticulous and captivating weirdness.

“Julie C. Day makes a bold debut with this genre-bending collection of stories. At times whimsical, at times heartbreaking, but always clear-eyed and honest,UNCOMMON MIRACLES proves that Day has joined the front ranks of the writers carrying American fantasy into a new golden age.” ~Nathan Ballingrud

“Julie C. Day’s new collection, Uncommon Miracles, relates stories about what happens when strangeness, dream-like and nightmarish, infiltrates the lives of everyday people. A unique new voice in short fiction—sharp writing and a wonderfully idiosyncratic imagination.” ~Jeffrey Ford

“Julie C. Day’s stories are strongly strange, whether happening in a sort of now in this country or in a weirdly altered past. These stories seem to be what the term American Gothic was meant for.” ~John Crowley

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’14) published her horror story “Sunshower Death” in the horror anthology Deadman’s Tome: The Conspiracy Issue on June 1st, 2018. She was also a guest on the Deadman’s Tome Podcast on June 20th, 2018—World Refugee Day—where she not only discusses her story but she also talks about the inspiration behind it: the death of rock icon Chris Cornell. The host of the podcast, Mr. Deadman, has plans for a second podcast to continue their discussion, but an appearance date has not yet been set. Renee also published a new blog post—“The Mysterious Death of Rock Legend Chris Cornell: The Blue Skies Murder”—on her WordPress site where she breaks down the botched death investigation of Chris Cornell. On the Other Stories Podcast episode #143, Renee was interviewed and did a reading of her short story “The Unemployed Neighbor.” This story also appears in issue #37 of Sirens Call WiHM EZine, the 6th Annual Women in Horror Month Edition.  In older news, Renee’s poem “This Is Only the Beginning” appears in the Horror Writers Association Poetry Showcase Volume IV, which was published in the fall of 2017.

Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) book, Alice Guy Blaché, Lost Visionary of the Cinema (Bloomsbury 2002), has been translated into Spanish by Plots Ediciones (2006); adapted as a play by La Recua Teatro in Toledo, Spain (2012); and adapted into the documentary Be Natural by Pamela Green. The documentary premiered at Cannes in May 2018. Her mystery/horror for middle grade readers, “Kamikaze Iguanas,” will appear in the MWA anthology Scream and Scream Again, edited by R. L. Stine for HarperCollins, publication date July 24th. Alison is now represented by Gina Panettieri of Talcott Notch Literary.

An excerpt from Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) new memoir, Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss, appears on the PBS site Next Avenue. Her essay, “The Unpredictability of Grief” is featured on Covey Club, a new online women’s magazine. At The Review Review, Lisa shared “How Lit Journal Publications Paved the Way to Published Memoir.” The book was recently reviewed at Literary MamaHalfway Down the Stairs, and MyCentralJersey. Lisa recently spoke at the Cedar Ridge Writers Series on “Three Big Challenges in Writing Memoir,” and addressed the New Jersey Library Association Conference on “Readers and Writers in the Library: Perfect Together.” Since her book’s publication in May, she’s also been interviewed at The Debutante BallSunlight Press, and Under the Sun. Lisa led a panel, “Memoir: It’s all Relative. The perils, pleasures, and pitfalls of writing about family,” at the Maplewood-South Orange (NJ) Book Festival; was featured on the Write The Book podcast (#508); and at The Quivering Pen, where she wrote about “My First (Disastrous) Writing Retreat.”  In July, Lisa will visit Newtonville Books (Newton, MA, July 12th); Blue Umbrella Books (Westfield, MA, July 14th), and Toadstool Bookstore (Keene, NH, July 15th). See her full list of upcoming events.

The Dollmaker of Kraków by R. M. Romero (Popular Fiction, S’15) has been shortlisted for the Young Quills Award in the U.K. and nominated for the Flemish Children’s and Youth Prize.

The Kweli Journal published “Piper’s March” written by Darlene Taylor (Fiction, W’17).

Lisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry, S’04) short story “Consorts” will be published in The New Southern Fugitives. Her short story “Every Body of Water” will be published in Flights. Lisa’s short-story collection, Impossibly Small Spaces, will be released in Ireland in late summer by Arlen House and in the U.S. in October (Arlen House/Syracuse University Press).

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “Emigrant Song” has been accepted for publication by Harpur Palate and will be included in their Fall 2018 issue.

Hats off to Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), whose short story “Midlife” was the sole fiction selection in the premiere issue of Torch, a journal of Richmond Community College, Hamlet, NC.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Cedar Valley Community College has offered Lindsey Barlow (Popular Fiction) a full-time Professor of English position, and she has accepted! The Texas state board meeting was on June 5th, and she was approved to teach full time. Lindsey is so excited and grateful. She thanks everyone who provided a letter of recommendation for her, and she thanks Cedar Valley, who allowed her to teach part time for so many years leading up to this.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction) is presenting his third semester research project on the philosophy of Philip K. Dick’s The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch at the SFRA conference in Milwaukee this month. He will also be presenting a similar paper at this year’s Worldcon in San Jose this August.

Nina Lichtenstein‘s (Creative Nonfiction) essay about growing up a latchkey kid in 1970s Oslo, Norway, was published in the Poydras Review in June. She also appeared as a teller at Brunswick’s own SoundBites with the theme “Grilled,” and told a story about being interrogated at the Ben Gurion airport in Israel, and how this made her not take her privilege for granted; you can listen to Nina share that story below. Nina has also had several submissions rejected/declined for publication, and looks forward to improve them and submit again! And again.

FACULTY

To mark Pride Month, Tin House is now running Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) essay “Sweetness Mattered” on their website. You can read it here.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) turned in Curious Toys, a novel set in 1915 Chicago, inspired by a true crime and the work of outsider artist Henry Darger, to Mullholland Books/Little Brown. Her short story “Ghost Light” appears in the new anthology Tiny Crimes, edited by Lincoln Michel and Nadxieli Nieto. In July, she’ll be a special guest at Comic-Con in San Diego, and then teaching a weeklong workshop for young writers at the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center.

This summer Cara Hoffman (Fiction, Popular Fiction) received an Edward Albee Fellowship and a Wellstone Center Fellowship and signed a two-book contract with Harper Collins.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will appear at San Diego Comic Con International. She will be doing signings of her comic book Mary Shelley Presents in the Kymera Press Booth, #2003. She will also appear on two panels: “A Celebration of Mary Shelley” on Thursday, July 19th, at 4:30—5:30 p.m. in Room 26AB; and “Women on the Dark Side” on Thursday, July 19th, 7:00-8:00 p.m.

Jim Kelly’s new short story collection, The Promise of Space and Other Stories, debuts on July 17th, just in time for the summer residency. Published by Prime Books, it includes 14 previously published stories, several of which have appeared in various Year’s Best Science Fiction anthologies, and one story, “Yukui,” which is original to the collection. At 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 31st, 2018, at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Jim will join his award-winning colleague John Chu for a reading at Speculative Boston, a new quarterly reading series featuring authors of science fiction, fantasy, and horror.

Debra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) essay about submerged and sometimes forgotten female singers’ voices, entitled “Buried Voices,” was featured as a Story of the Week in Narrative Magazine.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel We Got Him (New Rivers Books) is now out in Audiobook from Blunder Woman Productions, narrated by award-winning Audiobook star and Stonecoast alum Tanya Eby; it is available on Audible and more. In June, Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera had its Southwest Regional Premiere in suburban Dallas, Texas, at the Ohlook Performing Arts Center; the production was reviewed as “Perfect for late-night theater fun” here. Idol Talk—the new anthology on Teen Idols co-edited by Elizabeth with Stonecoast alum Tammy Wilson, featuring multiple Stonecoast contributors—is on Instagram ( idol_talk ) and has multiple summer readings, including:

  • St. Stephens Branch Library, Hickory, NC, on July 23rd at 6:00 p.m. (with Stonecoast alumna Tammy Wilson, appearing at NC readings)
  • Catawba Country Library in Newton, NC, on July 24th at 6:00 p.m.
  • Patrick Beaver Library in Hickory, NC, on July 31st at 6:30 p.m.
  • Toadstool Books in Peterborough, NH, on July 21st at 2:00 p.m. (with Stonecoast students Lee J. Kahrs and Kate Kastelein)
  • Newtonville Books in Newton, MA, on July 27th at 7:00 p.m. (with Stonecoast alumna Michelle Soucy)
  • NYC reading at KGB bar ion August 8th at 7:00 p.m. (with Stonecoasters Elizabeth Searle and Breena Clarke)
  • Main Street Books in Davidson, NC, on August 12th at 2:00 p.m.
  • Gaston Public Library in Gastonia, NC, on August 13th at 4:00 p.m.
  • Morrison Branch Library in Charlotte, NC, on August 21st at 7:00 p.m.
  • Harvard General Store in Harvard, MA, on August 30th at 6:00 p.m. (with Stonecoasters Lee J Kahrs, Elizabeth Searle, and Michelle Soucy)

 

 

 

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AWP 2018

Written by Suzanne Strempek Shea

Stonecoast was a boulder of a presence at the recent annual conference of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs. Held at the Tampa Convention Center March 8 to 11, the event was attended by 12,000, and featured 2,000 presenters, and 550 readings, panels and lecture. The largest literary conference in North America saw Stonecoasters shining at the podiums and on panels, plus in the enthusiastic audiences, and there would have been more from our community there had a blizzard not swept through the North and tangled travel plans. A reception in the lobby of a nearby hotel included administration, faculty, students, alums, and at least one soon-to-be firstie. The photos below show just some of the familiar faces there. Want to be in on the next? Make plans to meet at AWP 2019, in Portland, Oregon, March 27-30!

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Community News & Updates February 2018

ANNOUNCEMENT

This year, a number of Stonecoast’s Popular Fiction students, alumni, and faculty are program participants at Boskone, New England’s longest running science fiction convention, which takes place February 16-18, 2018, at the Westin Waterfront Hotel in Boston, MA. For more information about Boskone, please visit www.boskone.org, and to view the list of program items that feature a Stonecoast community member, please check out this post. We will also have a large contingent of people attending who aren’t on the program this year. Closing the convention, we have a Stonecoast Reading to highlight our community members who are attending Boskone. If you are available to join the fun, we’d love to see you there!

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is happy her new anime-inspired nightmare microfiction, “The Things Between Us,” is now available in the beautifully illustrated Quick Shivers from the Midwest anthology.

Katie Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) announces that her audio drama “Six Stories, Told at Night” has won a Parsec Award for Excellence in Speculative Fiction Podcasting (Best Story – Novella). A stage adaptation of “Six Stories” will premiere at the Toronto Fringe Festival in July 2018.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) has been broadcasting a series of five-minute audio essays on the Maine community radio station WERU. You can access these flash pieces from her blog. Her longer essay “Security Clearance,” which first appeared in Burrow Press’ “Fantastic Floridas,” is included in the upcoming anthology from University of Florida Press, In Season: Stories of Discovery, Loss, Home and Places In Between. The essay is also in her hybrid memoir Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, coming out in Fall 2018 from Burrow Press.

Julie C. Days (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Re-stitched”, which ran in the January issue of Split Lip Magazine, was Longform Fiction‘s pick of the week. Stealing Longform‘s story description, you can expect two sisters and a grotesque religious ritual. Umm yes, it is creepy. Julie’s Fightin’ Words interview can be found on the Split Lip blog. In other news, you can listen to a reprint of Julie’s story “The Rocket Farmer” at Podcastle 507. It was originally printed in 2017 issue of Interzone. If you’ve any interest in angry teenage girls, the history of rockets, and secret Florida farms, this story is for you.

Paula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) fourth novel, Here We Lie, was published on January 30th by Park Row Books, a division of Harlequin/Harper Collins. Publisher’s Weekly says Here We Lie “portrays the lies that people tell to find acceptance and the terrible acts that powerful people casually commit.” Booklist says the story “particularly resonates now, in the throes of the #metoo movement.” Paula is a lecturer of writing at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and VICE Sports, and just delivered a crime feature to Vanity Fair. You can read his latest piece (for VICE Sportshere. His most recent book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, was published by University of Nebraska Press in April. His next release, a nonfiction YA book about the historic Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fight of 1938, will be released by Macmillan Children’s Group later this year.

Becky Kightlinger’s (Fiction, W’14) debut novel, Megge of Bury Down: Book One of the Bury Down Chronicles, will be released by Zumaya Publications on February 1, 2018. Here’s a short summary:

In thirteenth-century Cornwall, on a sheep farm in the shadow of Bury Down, known for a thousand years as the land of the second sight, a healer has vowed to face flames rather than fail in her one task in this life: to bring her young daughter to vow to protect The Book of Seasons, an ancient grimoire whose power sustains the spirits of all their ancestors.

On the night of her vow-taking, wanting only to become a woman of Bury Down, and drawn by an inexplicable yearning to possess the book, Megge reaches for it. But when she touches its cover, it burns her fingers and she hears it whisper, “Murderer.” Fearing that the book will make her hurt those she loves, she rejects it and renounces her birthright.

To what lengths will her mother and the other women of Bury Down go to help Megge find the courage to take that vow? And how far will Megge go to elude a terrifying destiny?

Susan Lilley (Poetry, S’08) has been appointed the inaugural Poet Laureate of Orlando, Florida.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) second novel, Dovecote (B Ink, 2017), was reviewed in the Maine Sunday Telegram, January 21, 2018.  Anne’s third poetry chapbook, Alley of Dreams, will be published by Clare Songbirds Publishing House in March 2018.

Erin Roberts‘ (Popular Fiction, W ’18) short story “Sour Milk Girls” has gone from her thesis to the big time—it was published in the January issue of Clarkesworld and is available in print and in audio. Bonus story notes can be found on her website (as can her panel schedule for Boskone, which she’s hoping turns into a mini-Stonecoast reunion!).

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) has probably gone a little overboard, but is very excited for how 2018 is shaping up. In March, he will be presenting his essay “Out and Super” at ICFA. In April, he will be participating in a writing retreat at the Whiteley Center on San Juan Island, Washington. In May, he will be presenting an essay, “She Has Always Been Here,” at Dartmouth College, and in July will be participating in NUI-Galway’s Summer School for Teaching in Ireland. On the writing side, his story, “The Snow Queen’s Daughter” was selected as one of Metaphorosis Magazine‘s Best Stories of 2017.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction ’08) published a nonfiction work with Longreads, “What to Do With a Man Who Has a Story, and a Gun.”

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be teaching a class in worldbuilding for the Dallas organization the Writer’s Garret on April 14. She will also take part in the University of North Texas’ Honors College benefit, Great Conversations on March 1st, where she will lead a table in a discussion of using one’s fears as inspiration.

Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, S’04) short story “Even a Monkey” will appear in the March issue of Crannog. Her new collection of short fiction, Impossibly Small Spaces, will be released by Alren House in July in Ireland and in the U.S. in September.

 

FACULTY

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) will be teaching How to Be Your Own Best Line-Editor at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, DC, beginning February 6th. The goal of this four-session class is to turn you into a master of word-smithing!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) has sold two novels to Mulholland Books, Little Brown’s literary crime imprint: Curious Toys, set in 1915 Chicago and inspired by both a true crime and the life of outsider artist Henry Darger; and The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel. In early February, she will be guest of honor at Vinter, a literary convention in Uppsala, Sweden.

A round-up of news from Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry):

  • Debra’s essay “Things Not Seen in the Rear View Mirror” was selected for inclusion in Camas: Nature of the West.  25 Years 1992 – 2017, published in the Winter of  2017.
  • Her poem “Kablooey is the Sound You’ll Hear” was anthologized in Bullets into Bells: Poets & Citizens Respond to Gun Violence, edited by Brian Clements, Alexandra Teague, and Dean Rader and published by Beacon Press in the fall of 2017.
  • Another poem, “Getting Ready,” was selected for inclusion in Who Am I?, a grade-school textbook designed to introduce children to poetry. Published by Perfection Learning in the Fall of 2017.
  • In the summer of 2017, Debra delivered keynote addresses and taught workshops at the following three festivals and conferences: (1) Luminous Moment, Luminous Word: A Creative Writing and Mindfulness Retreat in the Sheyenne National Grasslands (August 4-6, 2017); (2) the ASLE Conference, Association of the Study of Literature and Environment at Wayne State University (June 22-24); and (3) Iota: Short Forms Conference, Campobello Island, Maine.  8 – 11 July 2017.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is preparing for performances of both her opera and rock opera in February. In January, ABC primetime showed a clip from the Chicago production of Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera on January 11th, 2018, as part of the ABC two-hour special on Tonya Harding. Also, On Superbowl Sunday afternoon (February 4th) at the Duxbury Free Public Library, Elizabeth is reading with superstar author and actress Marianne Leone (The Sopranos) from the anthology Elizabeth co-edited with Suzanne Strempek Shea featuring Leone and others: Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives. On February 13th: Broadway Stars Sing Songs from Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera in New York City at 54Below. Since the last news post, the team announces that the concert and concert CD will be directed by Grammy- and Emmy-award winner Michael J. Moritz; the concert songs (Book and Lyrics by Elizabeth; music by Michael Teoli) will be recorded and released as a CD from Broadway Records. Watch for upcoming livestream coverage on Broadway.com. And then on February 23rd, a full production of Elizabeth’s one-act chamber opera Tonya & Nancy: The Opera (music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross) is being performed by Mixed Precipitation, an operetta group in Minneapolis/St. Paul, the night of the Women’s Figure Skating finals at the Olympics.

Stonecoast Alumnus Tigh Rickman (Fiction, S’10) watching the “ABC moment” at his home in California

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Community News & Updates October 2016

ATTENTION: ALUMNI

The 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion Committee wants to hear from you! Led by co-chairs Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Frank Ard (Popular Fiction, S’14), Peter Maskaluk (Fiction, ’13), Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06), and Mihku Anderson (Fiction, S’10), Stonecoast is excited to celebrate 15 years in the literary community. Please fill out this brief survey with your attendance and preferences: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/86MCNWV

stonecoast-reunion-final

A message from the husband of Christine Tierney (Poetry, S’09), who is currently in need of a kidney.

Dear Family, Friends, and Universe,

Christine is a caring, generous, and beautiful person with probably the best sense of humor on the planet. She has been working with children for the past 23 years as an after school director. She is also a gifted poet, artist, and animal lover. But most of all, she is the absolute love of my life.

Eight years ago Christine was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease, (PKD). PKD is progressive and incurable. It causes clusters of cysts to grow inside the kidneys. As these cysts enlarge from fluid buildup, kidney failure can result. Unfortunately, Christine’s cysts are rapidly growing and her kidneys are losing function. She is now in need of a kidney transplant.

Christine was placed on the national kidney transplant list in August 2015, and is awaiting a deceased donor kidney, but this list is 80,000 names long, and the wait time for a deceased donor kidney is eight years or more. Christine is hoping for a transplant from a living donor because living donor kidneys have greater success rates than deceased donor kidneys, and nearly double the years of function. Through the living donation program, a healthy person can donate one of their kidneys and return to full health after a brief recovery.

I was tested to see if I am a match for Christine. Unfortunately, I am not. Both of Christine’s parents are now too old for organ donation. Finally, you may have read the article is The Boston Globe about a former Cambridgeport parent who was willing to donate and was a likely match, but has since been diagnosed with a medical condition that makes her an unsuitable donor.

So now we are casting our net wider, in hopes of finding someone who might be interested in donating a kidney to Christine. This would be a great gift to the both of us.

If you cannot do this, we understand perfectly. If you know anyone who might, please forward this letter widely. We are so grateful to you for passing it along to your family, friends, coworkers or classmates, congregation, or any other communities to which you belong. Also, please feel free to post this on all forms of social media.

If you would like to learn more about living kidney donation, please feel free to call me at (857) 334-9794 or email me at ljblanko@yahoo.com.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart,

Luis Julio Blanco

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W ’12) will present a seminar entitled “Archetypes and the Power of Attraction: Creating Dynamic Characters and Conflict in Fiction” to the Maine Romance Writers Association on October 8th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to report she is now an official Affiliate Member of the Horror Writer’s Association (her sale to Gamut last month made her eligible and her application was accepted!). Two of her Halloween recipes “Mummy Calzones” and “Witches Wands” will appear in the next issue of the HWA newsletter with accompanying photos. She’s also excited her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” originally published in Parsec’s Triangulations: Beneath the Surface will be reprinted in Cosmic Shores and Eldritch Tales this fall. Furthermore, her science fiction romance poem “The Blind Elephants of Io” was selected for performance at Arachnae Press’s Shortest Day: Solstice Shorts Festival 2016 funded by the Arts Council of England, in Greenwich on Wednesday, December 21, and will be published in a subsequent anthology of collected writings accepted by the show—this poem won a Long Form Honorable Mention in the 2016 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest. A reprint of Karen’s haunted house abduction micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in IronSoap.com’s 200CCs Issue #4 on October 7. Finally, Karen is thrilled to report she’s been asked to write an essay for Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s tenth anniversary Kickstarter.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay published in the Fall issue of The Journal.

9781608933952Kate Cone (Fiction, ’08) announces the publication of What’s Brewing in New England (Down East Books, Camden, ME), a guide to craft breweries in the six-state region. Kate’s first edition of What’s Brewing was published in 1997. After almost 20 years, Kate revisits the explosive New England beer scene with interviews, stories and descriptions of the beers. Available on Amazon.

For the second year in a row, a Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay has been named as a Notable in Best American Essays. This year, her piece “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” (which won a Maine Literary Award and was nominated for a Pushcart) made the notables list; the piece was a Sunday Rumpus Essay in July 2015. Penny’s book, Postcards from Here, just received a glowing review at Tinderbox Poetry Journal. Here is an excerpt from the review: “… the postcards come to the reader as precious objects assembled in a gorgeous yet unruly box. Here, all at once, we experience the lived chaos of mind, marriage, children, body, and place. It is a truth, a difficult representation to achieve, and Guisinger does so with skill and grace. Postcards From Here reminds us that a postcard’s purpose is not memory or story, but to send a small piece of oneself as a memento, rather than a definitive record or missive.”

Andrea Lani‘s (Fiction, W’14) essay “Monarch Summers” appeared in the Spring-Autumn issue of Snowy Egret. She also had two essays published online this month: “The Big Night” at Coffee + Crumbs and “How I Went from Domestic to Wild” at Role Reboot.

Will Ludwigsen’s (Popular Fiction, W’11) story “The Leaning Lincoln” is appearing in the October/November 2016 double issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction; he describes the story as “an autobiographical journey into the psyche of a boy coming to terms with the absence of magical justice in the world.” He also sold his story “Night Fever” to Asimov’s, too, and it’s likely to appear later in 2017.

9843219Alexis Paige‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in 2015, has been named a Best American Essays Notable in the 2016 anthology. In addition, Paige’s first book, Not a Place on Any Map, which won the 2016 Vine Leaves Press Vignette Collection Award, will be published December 5th by Vine Leaves Press. The book, a collection of lyric essays, will be available for pre-order in early November.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was honored to learn that one of her essays was selected for the Notables Essays section of Best American Essays 2016. (The piece, “Not Quite Meet Cute,” originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Blue Lyra Review.) Lisa’s essay, “On the Near Side of the Tracks,” appears in the current (Fall 2016) issue of Brevity.

Beyond Rain Man by Anne K. Ross (pen name for Creative Nonfiction, Winter ’07 graduate) is reviewed by Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) in the current issue of Mom Egg Review; the book review can be found here. Also, Anne will be on a LitQuake “Politics of Parenting” panel in the San Francisco Bay Area on October 9. Other events listed at www.beyondrainman.com.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz‘s (Fiction, S’09) novel, In the Context of Love, is a 2016 Readers’ Favorite Book Award Finalist. That marks the third award for the book she worked on while at Stonecoast.

Wilde Stories 2016Bonnie Jo Stufflebeams (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

Ashley K. Warren‘s (Fiction, S ’12) poem “Symptoms of a Brain Injury” was nominated by Easy Street for the 2016 Best of the Net anthology. Also, Ashley will serve as an artist in residence at the Billings Public Library in Billings, Montana, beginning in October. During her residency she will work with teen writers on the Letters to the Next President project, an initiative hosted by the National Writing Project, KQED, public media, and Educator Innovator partners.

Lindsey Wells (publishes as Lindsey Kemp; Creative Nonfiction, S’15) won the Empire Award (second place) in the New York Screenplay Contest for her New Girl spec script, “B.C.,” which she wrote as part of her third semester project under the guidance of the amazing Mike Kimball.

FACULTY

Letters from LimboJeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) new book of poetry, Letters from Limbo, will be launching this month from CavanKerry Press. Additional information can be found on Jeanne Marie’s website.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Guiltless Pleasures” has been accepted for publication in Crazyhorse Magazine. Aaron’s essay “Edward Albee Was My Mailman,” a tribute to the late playwright who wrote Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and many others, is in The Millions. In other news, Aaron will be delivering a presentation on Drown by Junot Diaz for Hispanic Heritage Month at the DC Public Library. And last but not least, if you’re in the DC area and having trouble with writer’s block, come to Aaron’s two-session class at Politics & Prose Bookstore, Breaking Through Writer’s Block.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just returned from a book tour in Sweden, where her novels Generation Loss and Available Dark (briefly) topped the bestseller list at #1 and #3 (the new Harry Potter was #4). In September, she’ll be featured at the National Book festival in Washington, DC, where she’ll be interviewed by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, and will also appear at the Fall for the Book festival in Fairfax, Virginia. Recent reviews include Tama Janowitz’s memoir Scream for The Los Angeles Times and Nisi Shawl’s novel Everfair for The Washington Post.

As noted in a previous Community blog, October 1 will see the debut of two new works by Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction). His short play “Glitch” premieres as part of the Paragon Science Fiction and Fantasy Theater festival at the The Public House Theatre in Chicago. And his novelette “One Sister, Two Sisters, Three” will be published in the Tenth Anniversary Issue of Clarkesworld Magazine.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play The Secret of Comedy runs October 20-30 (Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:00 p.m.) at Mayo Street Arts, Mayo Street, Portland, ME. For more information and reservations, click here.

the-secret-of-comedy

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) lyric essay “Some Things About that Day” was featured in Becoming a Great Essayist, a twenty-four part online “Great Courses” lecture series taught by the literary scholar Jennifer Cognard-Black (2016). Her essay “The Microphone Erotic” was published in the anthology From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women Writers and Their Machines (Michigan State University Press, 2016), and her essay “When the Band Broke Up” was awarded the 2016 Alligator Juniper Nonfiction Prize and was published in Alligator Juniper, Issue XX, 2016. In July and August 2016, Debra was invited to complete a month long artist residency at Le Moulin à Nef, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts location in Auvillar, France. Working with the painter Thomas Rice, Debra worked on a collaborative research nonfiction project about the oil boom in her home state of North Dakota, entitled “The Future Eaters.”

Tickets are now on sale for the six-week Chicago run of Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera; recent media coverage has included a Chicago Tribune piece that included the show on a Theater Preview list of “Tuneful Treats.” For ticket info, visit Theater Wit.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates April 2016

Note from Jenny O’Connell, Community Outreach Coordinator for Stonecoast MFA

In 2017, Stonecoast MFA turns fifteen!  We would like to invite you to come celebrate with us at an alumni reunion weekend during one of the 2017 residencies. I’ll be working closely with Robin to make sure the alumni weekend is framed around YOU. Please take a moment to fill out the (very brief!) survey, which was posted to the the Alumni Listserv, by May 1, 2016.

Also, if you haven’t had a chance to “like” the newly re-vamped Stonecoast Facebook Page or follow us on Twitter, please take a moment to join our online community and stay connected.  Both are updated frequently with news on Stonecoast writers and the literary world.  If you have any news about your own writing that you’d like to see posted, send it along to jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu.

We are excited to hear from you!  Happy writing.

Note from Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Artists Wielding Words and Images is a collaborative project of Maine Media Workshops + College, USM’s Stonecoast MFA, and Your Write Mind that addresses the role of art as an agent of social change. This kickoff event begins with a panel of artists who will share the challenges they face when seeking to communicate social issues in a way that opens hearts and minds. Breakout sessions follow the panel to provide participants with an experience of exploring how their own creativity can influence social change.

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) finally has her new website up and humming; you can access it here. She’d love to have you visit, look around and leave a comment. And other news, Moon Dark, Book #1 of The Auriano Curse, her paranormal historical romance, is now available in paperback format.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to report that her novel Catwalk (Midnight Ink, 2014) has won the 2015 Maxwell Award for fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. Catwalk is the third book in Sheila’s Animals in Focus Mystery series. Book #1, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and The Money Bird was a finalist in 2014.

Corpse RoadsKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has a new poem “Effects of Moonlight” and a reprint prose poem “So Normal and Unwritten” coming out in Folk Horror Revival’s forthcoming Corpse Roads horror poetry anthology. She sold a new flash fiction story “On Rising One Snowy Evening” to Parsec Ink‘s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface anthology. She’s also excited to announce her story “The Scarlet Cloak” is being produced in audio for the Gallery of Curiosities podcast, which she will narrate herself. Date update: Her poem about the Sad Puppies Kerfuffle “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear on April 15, 2016, in Eye to the Telescope #20. She’s so grateful for all of you and your continued inspiration and encouragements!

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) will be on a panel discussion called “Alien(ation): Diversity Under Attack, Racism, Homophobia, & Sexism at Hugo Awards & Beyond,“along with scholar André Carrington and science fiction author Craig Laurance Gidney, on Friday, April 8th, at 6:00-8:00 pm, at the CUNY Graduate Center, room 9204, 365 Broadway at 34th Street, Manhattan, NYC. The event is free and open to the public.

Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) debut novel, The Big Rewind (William Morrow), received 3/4 stars from Charles Finch in USA Today. She was also a USA Today “Weekend Pick” on Saturday, March 12.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lesson plan called “Making a Poem Hum” from the anthology Poetry Crossing will be published in Teachers & Writers magazine‘s April issue.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has been writing for the newly announced fantasy role-playing game from Obsidian Entertainment, Tyranny: “In Tyranny, the grand war between good and evil is over—and the forces of evil, led by Kyros the Overlord, have won. The Overlord’s merciless armies dominate the face of the world, and its denizens must find their new roles within the war-torn realm.” For more information about the game, including screenshots and a trailer, visit the website.

Tyranny

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) has two poems in the spring 2016 issue of diode. Her first full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room, will soon be released by Terrapin Books.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was happy to have her short story “Boy Trouble” appear in Brain, Child this month. Thanks to the Stonecoast Ireland Crew (S’13) and Nancy Holder for the revision advice, especially moving the gun to the end of the story. She also had a humor piece called “Advice to Writers from 80s Hair Bands” published on Beyond Your Blog, a short essay called “The Chickens” on Mutha Magazine, and another short essay called “One Cake or Three?” on the Brain, Mother Blog.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W ’05)  and Nancy Holder (faculty) both saw stories published in the March 2016 issue of Nightmare magazine. Sandra’s story features Susie Lovecraft, mother of famed H.P. Lovecraft, in a creepy tale about female sexuality and the forces that bind it. She also has more fiction forthcoming this year in Nightmare, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and more. Visit her at www.sandramcdonald.com.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece, “Signs of Alcoholism,” will be featured in the inaugural issue of Indicia.

Renee Olander (Poetry, W’05) presented a paper, “Language and Power in the Age of Trigger Warnings and Title IX Redux,” at the 27th Annual Spring Conference on the Teaching of Writing at Old Dominion University (March 21, 2016); she will participate in the panel “Literary Foremothers and Filling the Gaps” at the AWP Annual Conference in Los Angeles on April 1, 2016.  She has both a flash fiction (“Dear Torso, Stone-carved”) and a poem (“The Apparatus of the Dark”) forthcoming in the 2017 anthology Memoirs of the Feminine Divine, edited by Andrea Fekete and Lara Lillibridge.

The Book of the MandolinAnne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, will be published by B Ink Books on April 1st. You can watch the book trailer here.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry ’12; also ex-faculty) is in the midst of a Canada-wide tour for Let the Empire Down, her second collection with Biblioasis. An interview with Alexandra recently appeared in The Windsor Star. Alexandra begins her PhD (English and Critical Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, ’12) has started a podcast about love on an island (because she lives on an island in Alaska!), along with three radio-minded friends. Listen to the first episode here.

Sean Robinson’s (Popular Fiction, W’14) story “He Who Makes the Slippers,” a fairy tale written his first day at Stonecoast, was published in Mirror Dance. Sean also presented a paper at ICFA (International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts), “Ossomancing the Siren,” which started as his third semester project and has grown since then. He is also in the middle of his second semester as a Teaching Lecturer at Plymouth State University where he’s teaching writing and fairy tales and having a blast.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was one of three finalists in the Rose Metal Press Chapbook Contest for her CNF manuscript, Tuck the Story Away (judged by Ira Sukrungruang​). A narrative essay, ​”Jersey Nights on Broadway,” is running on the NYC story site, Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood.

9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webBeyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be released on April 5! Anne K. Ross is the pen name of a 2007 Creative Nonfiction graduate. For more information, visit the website.

Kathleen Saville‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey will be published by Arcade Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, in January 2017. She’s very excited, as you can imagine. While at Stonecoast, she worked with Cait Johnson, Barbara Hurd, and Debra Marquart on parts of her book; their guidance inspired her as did the wonderful Stonecoast environment.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) just released her collaborative audio fiction-music album Strange Monsters, funded through Kickstarter. The album features six of her previously published short stories read by actors and threaded with original musical compositions. The album is currently available through CDBaby here.

Julie VanDeKreke‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) work will be featured in the Spring Equinox 2016 edition of Mused: The Bella Online Literary Review, with one nonfiction piece, one poem, and two photos.

Christopher Varlack (Creative Nonfiction/Poetry, S’10) successfully passed his dissertation defense at Morgan State University this March with his PhD in English to be conferred this May.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) published his critical essay “Self-Speaking World” on experiments in autobiography in the Spring issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies. This started as a third semester project with Debra Marquart and then became part of his final residency presentation.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has a story, “Deanie’s House,” in Waypoints, Issue 2.

FACULTY

51RmY3JvlzL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_Susan Conley’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) photo/story book collaboration Stop Here This Is The Place: A Year In Motherland will be published April 14th. The book traces the year in the life of each of the collaborators’ children on their street in Maine and celebrates motherhood and simply being a kid. Real Simple Magazine will do a feature on Stop Here in April as well as Donwneast Magazine, The Portland Press Herald, and other media outlets. The book launch party will take place on Thursday, May 5th, from 5:30-8:00 p.m. at the Portland Museum of Art, and all in the Stonecoast greater community are welcome. An additional reading will take place on May 19th at Longfellow Books in Portland.

Tantor Audio has acquired the audio rights to David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) next novel, The Risen: A Novel of Spartacus. Steven Crossley is doing the narration and the audiobook will pub at the same time as the book, May 3rd.

In February, PBS NewsHour featured Martín Espada (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) and his new book of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. Check out both the television story and the online reading.

April’s a busy month for Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction). He’ll be on several panels at the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival in New Orleans as well as reading from new work there. He’s also judging the Bethesda Magazine Teen Fiction Contest as well as the Green Briar Review fiction contest. Finally, if you’re in the DC area, you can catch his class “Breaking Through Writer’s Block” at legendary Politics & Prose bookstore.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute play Houston will be part of the Students’ Short Play Festival at the Community College of Rhode Island, Liston Campus (One Hilton St.- Room 1120; 401.455.6116), April 20-23 at 7:30 p.m. and April 23-24 at 2:00 p.m.

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51ggQvO+PtL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Debra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) essay “The Perils of Travel” was published in Paris, Etc., a new anthology that explores what Paris means to writers who have visited and lived in this fascinating city.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to be on the writing faculty at the Hobart Book Village Festival of Women Writers 2016, co-founded by Breena Clarke; please visit the new blog and website for information and consider signing up for September in the beautiful “book reading capital of America.”

Reunite with some Stonecoast alums, and learn lots in the process at Bay Path University’s 13th Writers’ Day on the Longmeadow, MA, campus on April 16th. Stonecoast alumna Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) will be speaking on “Image Gold Rush: Mining Photographs for Narratives,” and alumna Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, ’04) talk will focus on “Liars, Criminals, and Lovers: The World of the Story/Fiction 101.” Stonecoast faculty member Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), Bay Path’s writer-in-residence and director of writing programs, will be there to greet you.

A full production of “Mags: A Conversation with an Audience,” based on Suzanne Strempek Shea’s book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, will be staged at the Majestic Theater in West Springfield, MA, June 9-12. Tickets go on sale in May. The Majestic was the site of the first reading of the play back in November. A reading of the play also will be held July 27 at the Bee Hive Theater in Dingle, Co. Kerry, Ireland, the adopted home town of Mags Riordan, subject of This Is Paradise and founder of the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Cape Maclear, Malawi. Connemara actor Tegolin Knowland will portray Mags. Both events will benefit the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic, which saves lives daily in a remote area that once had a single doctor for 800,000 residents.

In the wake of her essay on Portland in the 1970s that ran in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne has been sought for more quotes on the city’s scene way back when. The Bangor Daily News includes Suzanne in this piece.

Suzanne is also spending a lot of time these days cheering on her husband Tommy, whom some Stonecoasters might have met at residencies along the way. A former award-winning journalist who once covered the Red Sox (quite a job for a Yankees fan), Tommy has co-authored Dingers: The 101 Most Memorable Home Runs in Baseball History. To be released April 6 by Sports Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, and co-written by Joshua Shifrin, the book tells the stories of the authors’ choices of the top 100 homers and how each affected the game of baseball. Details are at www.tommysheastadium.com

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates March 2016

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled her flash “What the Dollhouse Said” was chosen as a top ten by Mocha Memoirs Press for their Women in Horror anthology. Furthermore, her poem “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear in issue 20 of Eye to the Telescope Magazine. Stonecoast is still one of the best things that has ever happened to her and she gives thanks for each of you every day.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “The Woman in the Woods”—a story that concerns itself with disasters, orphan trains, and siblings—can be found in the online journal Necessary Fiction. Episode 421 of starshipsofa-logoStarShipSofa also came out in February and features Julie’s narration of Fiona Moore’s story “The Metaphor.”

Elaine R. Flory (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been accepted to and is attending Green Mountain College’s MS in Environmental Studies program with a concentration in Writing and Communications. Living in Jamestown, NY, she is currently seeking a local volunteer position in an environmentally oriented nonprofit organization. Still pursuing creative writing as well, Elaine is looking forward to joining Pennwriters in the spring, and she plans on debuting some of her new eco-fiction at a weekly Pennwriters critique group in nearby Erie, PA.

A review of Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) was published in the January/February 2016 issue of Women’s Review of Books.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short fiction piece, “Mag-Lite,” will be featured in the upcoming issue of the Chiron Review.

Let the Empire DownAlexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry ’12, also ex-faculty) second trade collection Let the Empire Down will be released through Biblioasis this spring and will be supported by a cross-Canada tour, including stops in Toronto, Mississauga, Kingston, Windsor, Peterborough and Vancouver. Poems of Alexandra’s have recently appeared in Partisan and the anthology Best Canadian Poetry 2015 (Tightrope Books). On a different note, Alexandra will be embarking on her PhD studies (in English and Cultural Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) has started a new podcast with friends in Sitka, AK. The podcast is called Meet the Love Dorks and is all about finding love on a remote Alaskan island! You can find the show here.

The U.K.’s Venture Press has now e-published Michaela Roessner-Herman’s (Popular Fiction, S’08) second book, Vanishing Point, a science fiction novel set in the San Jose, CA, area, primarily in the Winchester Mystery house.

Richard SquiresRichard Squires (Fiction, S’14) published three stories last year: “The Best Friends Anyone Could Want” is in Upender: Art of Consequence; “The Soldier’s Relief” is in the Summer 2015 issue of The MacGuffin; and “Jews Don’t Believe in Hell” is in The Jewish Literary Journal.

The new trailer for Jacob Strunk‘s (Fiction, W’07) feature documentary The Green Standard debuted Super Bowl Sunday. You can see it here. And please follow the Facebook page for updates and festival information throughout the year.

Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) has recently been given the honor of winning the Dana Award in Fiction for the first forty pages of her novel, Escalante Moon. Receiving notification on her birthday was the greatest gift ever!

Julie VanDeKreke (Scharf) (Creative Nonfiction, S’10, best class ever!) will have her work featured in this upcoming publication of Mused: Online Literary Review, including two photographs, one poem, and a short nonfiction piece titled “Daddy’s Flowers.”

STUDENTS

Edge of Dark CoverBrenda Cooper‘s (Fiction) book Edge of Dark is a finalist for the Phillip K. Dick award for distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States. The award will be announced at Norwescon on March 25th in Seattle, WA. For more about the award, see http://www.philipkdickaward.org.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was featured in a February 27th article in UK newspaper The Guardian on why women writing about violence and sex is still considered transgressive, and she spoke at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK, on the future of the novella as a literary form. Her recent reviews include Charlie Jane Anders’ All the Birds in the Sky for The Los Angeles Times, and works by Peter Straub, Glen Hirschberg, and Victor Lavalle for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. On April 1, she will be at the Rubin Museum in New York City as part of Brainwave 2016, an annual series which pairs artists with neuroscientists for onstage conversations about consciousness and creativity—she and Dr. Carl Bazil will discuss parasomnia and the nature of fear. Hand’s forthcoming novel, Hard Light, has just received strong advance reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly.

Dark ShadowsLook Homeward, Vampire,” the Dark Shadows essay that Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) wrote for Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s upcoming MacFarland book on soap operas is online at Elizabeth’s website, Celebrities in Disgrace.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) craft essay, “Tell It Cool: On Writing with Restraint,” is forthcoming the Spring issue of The New Ohio Review (Issue #19). She has co-edited an anthology of flash sequences with Robert Alexander and Eric Braun. Nothing to Declare: A Guide to the Flash Sequence (forthcoming from northingtodeclarecoverWhite Pine Press on April 12th, 2016) is a ground-breaking anthology of cross-genre work that includes linked prose poems, narrative sequences, lyrical essays, koans, fairy tales, and epistolary addresses. It contains the work of over fifty writers, including Nin Andrews, Jennifer Kwon Dobbs, Marie Harris, Jim Harrison, Gian Lombardo, Julie Marie Wade, and Gary Young. Also, Debra’s poem “Small Buried Things” has been published in Fracture: Essays, Poems and Stories on Fracking in America, co-edited by Taylor Brorby and Stefanie Brook Trout, recently published by Ice Cube Press. Fracture brings together a choir of established and emerging writers, giving voice to the complexities of hydraulic fracturing across the United States. During a time in which so much information is known about fracking, art is needed to move the public consciousness and national conversation towards better land practices.

DownEastCover_1603-1200-462x580In an essay in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) looks back on the pre-cool Portland she knew as an art school student in the 1970s. She thanks those who offered comments after she read an early draft of this at the January residency. Suzanne also is looking forward to the thirteenth Writers’ Day at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA, where she is writer in residence. The April 16th day of lectures on writing and publishing will include presentations by Stonecoast alums Bunny Goodjohn and Lisa C. Taylor. Both authors’ books, including Bunny’s newest novel The Beginning Things and Lisa’s new short story collection Growing a New Tail, will be available for sale throughout the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates February 2016

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is ecstatic to announce she has signed a contract with a small press for her 26k word novella “Swift for the Sun” (historical pirate adventure/romance) which will be released under a pseudonym in the first quarter of 2017. It’s the biggest advance and largest royalties percentage she’s ever signed for and she’s very excited. Furthermore, Karen’s poem “NeverNever Holes,” originally published on Zingara Poet, will be reprinted in a forthcoming Love Poems anthology edited by Johnny M. Tucker, Jr. Also, the second issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring nonfiction by Stonecoast alumnus Adam Gallardo and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction, for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

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Space Heart,” an essay by Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11), appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of Solstice Literary Magazine. Her poem “Flowering” was re-published in A Year of Being Here. In February, she will be an Associate Artist under writer David Shields at the residency program of the Atlantic Center for the Arts. From there, she will go to Foundation Obras in Portugal for a three-week residency.

Isthmus-issue-4-e1452206003965Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “Holes in Heaven”—a story that concerns itself with sibling rivalry, stellar nurseries, and exiled children—can be found in the print journal Isthmus; an excerpt is available online. Issue 21 of the Small Beer podcast also came out in January and features Julie’s narration of Mary Rickert’s story “Cold Fires.”

Nikki Flionis (Fiction, ’10) is among many long-time Bostonians reflecting on their lives in Streets of Echoes, the latest volume in the City of Boston’s memoir project series. Developed in collaboration with Grubstreet, this volume includes residents of Back Bay, Fenway, Beacon Hill-West End, and Dorchester. Flionis’ essay, “Rooms with Adieu,” focuses on the old rooming house culture, wiped out with stunning speed by the advent of the residential condominium in the 1980’s.

_6757124Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Maine author and former Pushcart winner Jennifer Lunden in December 2015. And 2016 is off to a grand start: Penny’s book Postcards from Here is now available for order.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry/Artistic Collaboration, W’08) was awarded the first Oregon Literary Fellowship for Writers of Color in 2016. Her debut poetry collection, the small claim of bones, placed second in the 2015 International Latino Book Awards, and she was selected by Poets & Writers Magazine as a 2014 Notable Debut Poet.

Joe M McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) short story “Snowbird” appears in the March 2016 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to have her essay “Seduction” included in Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, an anthology to be released by Ice Cube Press later this month. Fracture explores the well-known and little-known complexities of fracking through first-hand experience, investigative journalism, storytelling, and verse. The collection will also feature the work of Stonecoast faculty Debra Marquart, former Stonecoast faculty Barbara Hurd, and several other acclaimed environmental writers. The book can be pre-ordered here.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) essay “Sound and Fury, Signifying” appeared in Synaesthesia Magazine in January. Another CNF piece, “​Gray,” received honorable mention in the 2015​ Our Past Loves contest and 9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webis now posted online (scroll down). ​Lisa has ​been invited to present a craft seminar at HippoCamp 2016​: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA, in August​. ​Conference registration is now open.​ Lisa’s humor essay, “The Long Pink Line,” has been accepted for Flash Nonfiction Funny.

Anne K. Ross’s (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) book Beyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be published on April 5, 2016, by Leatherback Press.

Tripping Back Blue coverKara Storti‘s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Tripping Back Blue, will be released on April 1st by CarolRhoda Lab, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about Finn, a 17-year-old full of paradoxes. He’s a drug dealer, but he’s scoring money to send his twin sister to Harvard. He’s desperate to shoot up even though he’s the most popular kid in Dammertown. He’s a philosopher and orator who’s failing all his classes. The only time he finds peace is when he’s bird-watching. Finn’s life begins to spiral out of control, until he discovers a miracle drug called indigo. Finn is convinced that the drug is the way out of everything broken in his life. But is it really as magical as it seems?

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) stories “Feeding the Skeleton Cats” and “Tornado Season” appeared in Eleven ElevenHer story “The Damaged,” originally published in Interzone, appeared on the podcast StarShipSofa. “Skeletons,” originally in Room, was reprinted on the LGBTQ podcast Glittership.

Olive Sullivan (Fiction/Cross-Genre Poetry, S’15) is the editor of a new fine arts magazine produced by students in the Department of Communication at Missouri Southern State University, where Sullivan is an assistant professor. The magazine, Vivid, hosted a launch party January 22nd in downtown Joplin. The website is www.vividfinearts.com. Here is a link to a TV news feature about the launch.

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grimmdj-front-finalBoskone 53, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, will feature among their program participants Stonecoast faculty James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss as well as alumnae Julie C. Day and Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09). This year Erin Underwood is serving as Program Head for Boskone, and she was recently appointed as Chair for next year’s convention. Join us in Boston, MA from February 19-21, 2016, and visit the Boskone website for membership information. The Grimm Future, edited by popular fiction alumna Erin Underwood, will be released in February 2016 by NESFA Press and will be featured as this year’s Boskone book. The Grimm Future is a new science fiction anthology of reimagined Grimm fairy tales that features original fiction by 14 of today’s most exciting authors including Stonecoast faculty member Nancy Holder and alumna Sandra McDonald.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) marks a return to songwriting with a new record deal and a new album! Preacher Boy – The National Blues is now available direct from Altco Recordings, or on iTunes and other digital music services

An Unfinished Story about Eagles,” by Rick Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05), appears in the latest edition of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. His blog, The Geriatric Pilgrim, now comes out twice a month.

FACULTY

kanth3Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) review of Garth Greenwell’s novel What Belongs to You appeared in the New York Times Book Review.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new story titled “Whatever Kills in Vegas” in Kolchak: Passages of the Macabre, published by Moonstone Books.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem “Lament” has been selected by guest editor, Edward Hirsch, for inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology. The poem, “Lament,” a section of a long poem in Marquart’s recent collection, Small Buried Things, addresses the ravages of best-american-poetry-2016-9781501127557_lgfracking in her home state of North Dakota. The poem was originally published by New Letters in 2014. The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology will be published by Scribner in September 2016.

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

By request of the editors, Lisa Romeo S’08 would like to pass along this opportunity:​  Flash Nonfiction Funny, a planned collection of humorous short-short nonfiction pieces. Editors Tom Hazuka and Dinty W. Moore are soliciting submissions, 750 words maximum; both unpublished and previously published selections are welcome. Email submissions as Microsoft Word documents to either tom@tomhazuka.com or moored4@ohio.edu (not both, please).

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