Tag Archives: Debra Marquart

Community News & Updates February 2018

ANNOUNCEMENT

This year, a number of Stonecoast’s Popular Fiction students, alumni, and faculty are program participants at Boskone, New England’s longest running science fiction convention, which takes place February 16-18, 2018, at the Westin Waterfront Hotel in Boston, MA. For more information about Boskone, please visit www.boskone.org, and to view the list of program items that feature a Stonecoast community member, please check out this post. We will also have a large contingent of people attending who aren’t on the program this year. Closing the convention, we have a Stonecoast Reading to highlight our community members who are attending Boskone. If you are available to join the fun, we’d love to see you there!

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is happy her new anime-inspired nightmare microfiction, “The Things Between Us,” is now available in the beautifully illustrated Quick Shivers from the Midwest anthology.

Katie Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) announces that her audio drama “Six Stories, Told at Night” has won a Parsec Award for Excellence in Speculative Fiction Podcasting (Best Story – Novella). A stage adaptation of “Six Stories” will premiere at the Toronto Fringe Festival in July 2018.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) has been broadcasting a series of five-minute audio essays on the Maine community radio station WERU. You can access these flash pieces from her blog. Her longer essay “Security Clearance,” which first appeared in Burrow Press’ “Fantastic Floridas,” is included in the upcoming anthology from University of Florida Press, In Season: Stories of Discovery, Loss, Home and Places In Between. The essay is also in her hybrid memoir Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, coming out in Fall 2018 from Burrow Press.

Julie C. Days (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Re-stitched”, which ran in the January issue of Split Lip Magazine, was Longform Fiction‘s pick of the week. Stealing Longform‘s story description, you can expect two sisters and a grotesque religious ritual. Umm yes, it is creepy. Julie’s Fightin’ Words interview can be found on the Split Lip blog. In other news, you can listen to a reprint of Julie’s story “The Rocket Farmer” at Podcastle 507. It was originally printed in 2017 issue of Interzone. If you’ve any interest in angry teenage girls, the history of rockets, and secret Florida farms, this story is for you.

Paula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) fourth novel, Here We Lie, was published on January 30th by Park Row Books, a division of Harlequin/Harper Collins. Publisher’s Weekly says Here We Lie “portrays the lies that people tell to find acceptance and the terrible acts that powerful people casually commit.” Booklist says the story “particularly resonates now, in the throes of the #metoo movement.” Paula is a lecturer of writing at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, and VICE Sports, and just delivered a crime feature to Vanity Fair. You can read his latest piece (for VICE Sportshere. His most recent book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, was published by University of Nebraska Press in April. His next release, a nonfiction YA book about the historic Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fight of 1938, will be released by Macmillan Children’s Group later this year.

Becky Kightlinger’s (Fiction, W’14) debut novel, Megge of Bury Down: Book One of the Bury Down Chronicles, will be released by Zumaya Publications on February 1, 2018. Here’s a short summary:

In thirteenth-century Cornwall, on a sheep farm in the shadow of Bury Down, known for a thousand years as the land of the second sight, a healer has vowed to face flames rather than fail in her one task in this life: to bring her young daughter to vow to protect The Book of Seasons, an ancient grimoire whose power sustains the spirits of all their ancestors.

On the night of her vow-taking, wanting only to become a woman of Bury Down, and drawn by an inexplicable yearning to possess the book, Megge reaches for it. But when she touches its cover, it burns her fingers and she hears it whisper, “Murderer.” Fearing that the book will make her hurt those she loves, she rejects it and renounces her birthright.

To what lengths will her mother and the other women of Bury Down go to help Megge find the courage to take that vow? And how far will Megge go to elude a terrifying destiny?

Susan Lilley (Poetry, S’08) has been appointed the inaugural Poet Laureate of Orlando, Florida.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) second novel, Dovecote (B Ink, 2017), was reviewed in the Maine Sunday Telegram, January 21, 2018.  Anne’s third poetry chapbook, Alley of Dreams, will be published by Clare Songbirds Publishing House in March 2018.

Erin Roberts‘ (Popular Fiction, W ’18) short story “Sour Milk Girls” has gone from her thesis to the big time—it was published in the January issue of Clarkesworld and is available in print and in audio. Bonus story notes can be found on her website (as can her panel schedule for Boskone, which she’s hoping turns into a mini-Stonecoast reunion!).

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) has probably gone a little overboard, but is very excited for how 2018 is shaping up. In March, he will be presenting his essay “Out and Super” at ICFA. In April, he will be participating in a writing retreat at the Whiteley Center on San Juan Island, Washington. In May, he will be presenting an essay, “She Has Always Been Here,” at Dartmouth College, and in July will be participating in NUI-Galway’s Summer School for Teaching in Ireland. On the writing side, his story, “The Snow Queen’s Daughter” was selected as one of Metaphorosis Magazine‘s Best Stories of 2017.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction ’08) published a nonfiction work with Longreads, “What to Do With a Man Who Has a Story, and a Gun.”

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be teaching a class in worldbuilding for the Dallas organization the Writer’s Garret on April 14. She will also take part in the University of North Texas’ Honors College benefit, Great Conversations on March 1st, where she will lead a table in a discussion of using one’s fears as inspiration.

Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, S’04) short story “Even a Monkey” will appear in the March issue of Crannog. Her new collection of short fiction, Impossibly Small Spaces, will be released by Alren House in July in Ireland and in the U.S. in September.

 

FACULTY

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) will be teaching How to Be Your Own Best Line-Editor at Politics & Prose Bookstore in Washington, DC, beginning February 6th. The goal of this four-session class is to turn you into a master of word-smithing!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) has sold two novels to Mulholland Books, Little Brown’s literary crime imprint: Curious Toys, set in 1915 Chicago and inspired by both a true crime and the life of outsider artist Henry Darger; and The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel. In early February, she will be guest of honor at Vinter, a literary convention in Uppsala, Sweden.

A round-up of news from Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry):

  • Debra’s essay “Things Not Seen in the Rear View Mirror” was selected for inclusion in Camas: Nature of the West.  25 Years 1992 – 2017, published in the Winter of  2017.
  • Her poem “Kablooey is the Sound You’ll Hear” was anthologized in Bullets into Bells: Poets & Citizens Respond to Gun Violence, edited by Brian Clements, Alexandra Teague, and Dean Rader and published by Beacon Press in the fall of 2017.
  • Another poem, “Getting Ready,” was selected for inclusion in Who Am I?, a grade-school textbook designed to introduce children to poetry. Published by Perfection Learning in the Fall of 2017.
  • In the summer of 2017, Debra delivered keynote addresses and taught workshops at the following three festivals and conferences: (1) Luminous Moment, Luminous Word: A Creative Writing and Mindfulness Retreat in the Sheyenne National Grasslands (August 4-6, 2017); (2) the ASLE Conference, Association of the Study of Literature and Environment at Wayne State University (June 22-24); and (3) Iota: Short Forms Conference, Campobello Island, Maine.  8 – 11 July 2017.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is preparing for performances of both her opera and rock opera in February. In January, ABC primetime showed a clip from the Chicago production of Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera on January 11th, 2018, as part of the ABC two-hour special on Tonya Harding. Also, On Superbowl Sunday afternoon (February 4th) at the Duxbury Free Public Library, Elizabeth is reading with superstar author and actress Marianne Leone (The Sopranos) from the anthology Elizabeth co-edited with Suzanne Strempek Shea featuring Leone and others: Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives. On February 13th: Broadway Stars Sing Songs from Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera in New York City at 54Below. Since the last news post, the team announces that the concert and concert CD will be directed by Grammy- and Emmy-award winner Michael J. Moritz; the concert songs (Book and Lyrics by Elizabeth; music by Michael Teoli) will be recorded and released as a CD from Broadway Records. Watch for upcoming livestream coverage on Broadway.com. And then on February 23rd, a full production of Elizabeth’s one-act chamber opera Tonya & Nancy: The Opera (music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross) is being performed by Mixed Precipitation, an operetta group in Minneapolis/St. Paul, the night of the Women’s Figure Skating finals at the Olympics.

Stonecoast Alumnus Tigh Rickman (Fiction, S’10) watching the “ABC moment” at his home in California

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Community News & Updates October 2016

ATTENTION: ALUMNI

The 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion Committee wants to hear from you! Led by co-chairs Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Frank Ard (Popular Fiction, S’14), Peter Maskaluk (Fiction, ’13), Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06), and Mihku Anderson (Fiction, S’10), Stonecoast is excited to celebrate 15 years in the literary community. Please fill out this brief survey with your attendance and preferences: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/86MCNWV

stonecoast-reunion-final

A message from the husband of Christine Tierney (Poetry, S’09), who is currently in need of a kidney.

Dear Family, Friends, and Universe,

Christine is a caring, generous, and beautiful person with probably the best sense of humor on the planet. She has been working with children for the past 23 years as an after school director. She is also a gifted poet, artist, and animal lover. But most of all, she is the absolute love of my life.

Eight years ago Christine was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease, (PKD). PKD is progressive and incurable. It causes clusters of cysts to grow inside the kidneys. As these cysts enlarge from fluid buildup, kidney failure can result. Unfortunately, Christine’s cysts are rapidly growing and her kidneys are losing function. She is now in need of a kidney transplant.

Christine was placed on the national kidney transplant list in August 2015, and is awaiting a deceased donor kidney, but this list is 80,000 names long, and the wait time for a deceased donor kidney is eight years or more. Christine is hoping for a transplant from a living donor because living donor kidneys have greater success rates than deceased donor kidneys, and nearly double the years of function. Through the living donation program, a healthy person can donate one of their kidneys and return to full health after a brief recovery.

I was tested to see if I am a match for Christine. Unfortunately, I am not. Both of Christine’s parents are now too old for organ donation. Finally, you may have read the article is The Boston Globe about a former Cambridgeport parent who was willing to donate and was a likely match, but has since been diagnosed with a medical condition that makes her an unsuitable donor.

So now we are casting our net wider, in hopes of finding someone who might be interested in donating a kidney to Christine. This would be a great gift to the both of us.

If you cannot do this, we understand perfectly. If you know anyone who might, please forward this letter widely. We are so grateful to you for passing it along to your family, friends, coworkers or classmates, congregation, or any other communities to which you belong. Also, please feel free to post this on all forms of social media.

If you would like to learn more about living kidney donation, please feel free to call me at (857) 334-9794 or email me at ljblanko@yahoo.com.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart,

Luis Julio Blanco

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W ’12) will present a seminar entitled “Archetypes and the Power of Attraction: Creating Dynamic Characters and Conflict in Fiction” to the Maine Romance Writers Association on October 8th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to report she is now an official Affiliate Member of the Horror Writer’s Association (her sale to Gamut last month made her eligible and her application was accepted!). Two of her Halloween recipes “Mummy Calzones” and “Witches Wands” will appear in the next issue of the HWA newsletter with accompanying photos. She’s also excited her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” originally published in Parsec’s Triangulations: Beneath the Surface will be reprinted in Cosmic Shores and Eldritch Tales this fall. Furthermore, her science fiction romance poem “The Blind Elephants of Io” was selected for performance at Arachnae Press’s Shortest Day: Solstice Shorts Festival 2016 funded by the Arts Council of England, in Greenwich on Wednesday, December 21, and will be published in a subsequent anthology of collected writings accepted by the show—this poem won a Long Form Honorable Mention in the 2016 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest. A reprint of Karen’s haunted house abduction micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in IronSoap.com’s 200CCs Issue #4 on October 7. Finally, Karen is thrilled to report she’s been asked to write an essay for Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s tenth anniversary Kickstarter.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay published in the Fall issue of The Journal.

9781608933952Kate Cone (Fiction, ’08) announces the publication of What’s Brewing in New England (Down East Books, Camden, ME), a guide to craft breweries in the six-state region. Kate’s first edition of What’s Brewing was published in 1997. After almost 20 years, Kate revisits the explosive New England beer scene with interviews, stories and descriptions of the beers. Available on Amazon.

For the second year in a row, a Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay has been named as a Notable in Best American Essays. This year, her piece “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” (which won a Maine Literary Award and was nominated for a Pushcart) made the notables list; the piece was a Sunday Rumpus Essay in July 2015. Penny’s book, Postcards from Here, just received a glowing review at Tinderbox Poetry Journal. Here is an excerpt from the review: “… the postcards come to the reader as precious objects assembled in a gorgeous yet unruly box. Here, all at once, we experience the lived chaos of mind, marriage, children, body, and place. It is a truth, a difficult representation to achieve, and Guisinger does so with skill and grace. Postcards From Here reminds us that a postcard’s purpose is not memory or story, but to send a small piece of oneself as a memento, rather than a definitive record or missive.”

Andrea Lani‘s (Fiction, W’14) essay “Monarch Summers” appeared in the Spring-Autumn issue of Snowy Egret. She also had two essays published online this month: “The Big Night” at Coffee + Crumbs and “How I Went from Domestic to Wild” at Role Reboot.

Will Ludwigsen’s (Popular Fiction, W’11) story “The Leaning Lincoln” is appearing in the October/November 2016 double issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction; he describes the story as “an autobiographical journey into the psyche of a boy coming to terms with the absence of magical justice in the world.” He also sold his story “Night Fever” to Asimov’s, too, and it’s likely to appear later in 2017.

9843219Alexis Paige‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in 2015, has been named a Best American Essays Notable in the 2016 anthology. In addition, Paige’s first book, Not a Place on Any Map, which won the 2016 Vine Leaves Press Vignette Collection Award, will be published December 5th by Vine Leaves Press. The book, a collection of lyric essays, will be available for pre-order in early November.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was honored to learn that one of her essays was selected for the Notables Essays section of Best American Essays 2016. (The piece, “Not Quite Meet Cute,” originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Blue Lyra Review.) Lisa’s essay, “On the Near Side of the Tracks,” appears in the current (Fall 2016) issue of Brevity.

Beyond Rain Man by Anne K. Ross (pen name for Creative Nonfiction, Winter ’07 graduate) is reviewed by Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) in the current issue of Mom Egg Review; the book review can be found here. Also, Anne will be on a LitQuake “Politics of Parenting” panel in the San Francisco Bay Area on October 9. Other events listed at www.beyondrainman.com.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz‘s (Fiction, S’09) novel, In the Context of Love, is a 2016 Readers’ Favorite Book Award Finalist. That marks the third award for the book she worked on while at Stonecoast.

Wilde Stories 2016Bonnie Jo Stufflebeams (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

Ashley K. Warren‘s (Fiction, S ’12) poem “Symptoms of a Brain Injury” was nominated by Easy Street for the 2016 Best of the Net anthology. Also, Ashley will serve as an artist in residence at the Billings Public Library in Billings, Montana, beginning in October. During her residency she will work with teen writers on the Letters to the Next President project, an initiative hosted by the National Writing Project, KQED, public media, and Educator Innovator partners.

Lindsey Wells (publishes as Lindsey Kemp; Creative Nonfiction, S’15) won the Empire Award (second place) in the New York Screenplay Contest for her New Girl spec script, “B.C.,” which she wrote as part of her third semester project under the guidance of the amazing Mike Kimball.

FACULTY

Letters from LimboJeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) new book of poetry, Letters from Limbo, will be launching this month from CavanKerry Press. Additional information can be found on Jeanne Marie’s website.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Guiltless Pleasures” has been accepted for publication in Crazyhorse Magazine. Aaron’s essay “Edward Albee Was My Mailman,” a tribute to the late playwright who wrote Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and many others, is in The Millions. In other news, Aaron will be delivering a presentation on Drown by Junot Diaz for Hispanic Heritage Month at the DC Public Library. And last but not least, if you’re in the DC area and having trouble with writer’s block, come to Aaron’s two-session class at Politics & Prose Bookstore, Breaking Through Writer’s Block.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just returned from a book tour in Sweden, where her novels Generation Loss and Available Dark (briefly) topped the bestseller list at #1 and #3 (the new Harry Potter was #4). In September, she’ll be featured at the National Book festival in Washington, DC, where she’ll be interviewed by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, and will also appear at the Fall for the Book festival in Fairfax, Virginia. Recent reviews include Tama Janowitz’s memoir Scream for The Los Angeles Times and Nisi Shawl’s novel Everfair for The Washington Post.

As noted in a previous Community blog, October 1 will see the debut of two new works by Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction). His short play “Glitch” premieres as part of the Paragon Science Fiction and Fantasy Theater festival at the The Public House Theatre in Chicago. And his novelette “One Sister, Two Sisters, Three” will be published in the Tenth Anniversary Issue of Clarkesworld Magazine.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play The Secret of Comedy runs October 20-30 (Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:00 p.m.) at Mayo Street Arts, Mayo Street, Portland, ME. For more information and reservations, click here.

the-secret-of-comedy

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) lyric essay “Some Things About that Day” was featured in Becoming a Great Essayist, a twenty-four part online “Great Courses” lecture series taught by the literary scholar Jennifer Cognard-Black (2016). Her essay “The Microphone Erotic” was published in the anthology From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women Writers and Their Machines (Michigan State University Press, 2016), and her essay “When the Band Broke Up” was awarded the 2016 Alligator Juniper Nonfiction Prize and was published in Alligator Juniper, Issue XX, 2016. In July and August 2016, Debra was invited to complete a month long artist residency at Le Moulin à Nef, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts location in Auvillar, France. Working with the painter Thomas Rice, Debra worked on a collaborative research nonfiction project about the oil boom in her home state of North Dakota, entitled “The Future Eaters.”

Tickets are now on sale for the six-week Chicago run of Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera; recent media coverage has included a Chicago Tribune piece that included the show on a Theater Preview list of “Tuneful Treats.” For ticket info, visit Theater Wit.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates April 2016

Note from Jenny O’Connell, Community Outreach Coordinator for Stonecoast MFA

In 2017, Stonecoast MFA turns fifteen!  We would like to invite you to come celebrate with us at an alumni reunion weekend during one of the 2017 residencies. I’ll be working closely with Robin to make sure the alumni weekend is framed around YOU. Please take a moment to fill out the (very brief!) survey, which was posted to the the Alumni Listserv, by May 1, 2016.

Also, if you haven’t had a chance to “like” the newly re-vamped Stonecoast Facebook Page or follow us on Twitter, please take a moment to join our online community and stay connected.  Both are updated frequently with news on Stonecoast writers and the literary world.  If you have any news about your own writing that you’d like to see posted, send it along to jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu.

We are excited to hear from you!  Happy writing.

Note from Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Artists Wielding Words and Images is a collaborative project of Maine Media Workshops + College, USM’s Stonecoast MFA, and Your Write Mind that addresses the role of art as an agent of social change. This kickoff event begins with a panel of artists who will share the challenges they face when seeking to communicate social issues in a way that opens hearts and minds. Breakout sessions follow the panel to provide participants with an experience of exploring how their own creativity can influence social change.

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Photograph: © Martha Rial / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) finally has her new website up and humming; you can access it here. She’d love to have you visit, look around and leave a comment. And other news, Moon Dark, Book #1 of The Auriano Curse, her paranormal historical romance, is now available in paperback format.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to report that her novel Catwalk (Midnight Ink, 2014) has won the 2015 Maxwell Award for fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. Catwalk is the third book in Sheila’s Animals in Focus Mystery series. Book #1, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and The Money Bird was a finalist in 2014.

Corpse RoadsKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has a new poem “Effects of Moonlight” and a reprint prose poem “So Normal and Unwritten” coming out in Folk Horror Revival’s forthcoming Corpse Roads horror poetry anthology. She sold a new flash fiction story “On Rising One Snowy Evening” to Parsec Ink‘s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface anthology. She’s also excited to announce her story “The Scarlet Cloak” is being produced in audio for the Gallery of Curiosities podcast, which she will narrate herself. Date update: Her poem about the Sad Puppies Kerfuffle “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear on April 15, 2016, in Eye to the Telescope #20. She’s so grateful for all of you and your continued inspiration and encouragements!

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) will be on a panel discussion called “Alien(ation): Diversity Under Attack, Racism, Homophobia, & Sexism at Hugo Awards & Beyond,“along with scholar André Carrington and science fiction author Craig Laurance Gidney, on Friday, April 8th, at 6:00-8:00 pm, at the CUNY Graduate Center, room 9204, 365 Broadway at 34th Street, Manhattan, NYC. The event is free and open to the public.

Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) debut novel, The Big Rewind (William Morrow), received 3/4 stars from Charles Finch in USA Today. She was also a USA Today “Weekend Pick” on Saturday, March 12.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lesson plan called “Making a Poem Hum” from the anthology Poetry Crossing will be published in Teachers & Writers magazine‘s April issue.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has been writing for the newly announced fantasy role-playing game from Obsidian Entertainment, Tyranny: “In Tyranny, the grand war between good and evil is over—and the forces of evil, led by Kyros the Overlord, have won. The Overlord’s merciless armies dominate the face of the world, and its denizens must find their new roles within the war-torn realm.” For more information about the game, including screenshots and a trailer, visit the website.

Tyranny

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) has two poems in the spring 2016 issue of diode. Her first full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room, will soon be released by Terrapin Books.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was happy to have her short story “Boy Trouble” appear in Brain, Child this month. Thanks to the Stonecoast Ireland Crew (S’13) and Nancy Holder for the revision advice, especially moving the gun to the end of the story. She also had a humor piece called “Advice to Writers from 80s Hair Bands” published on Beyond Your Blog, a short essay called “The Chickens” on Mutha Magazine, and another short essay called “One Cake or Three?” on the Brain, Mother Blog.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W ’05)  and Nancy Holder (faculty) both saw stories published in the March 2016 issue of Nightmare magazine. Sandra’s story features Susie Lovecraft, mother of famed H.P. Lovecraft, in a creepy tale about female sexuality and the forces that bind it. She also has more fiction forthcoming this year in Nightmare, Asimov’s Science Fiction, and more. Visit her at www.sandramcdonald.com.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece, “Signs of Alcoholism,” will be featured in the inaugural issue of Indicia.

Renee Olander (Poetry, W’05) presented a paper, “Language and Power in the Age of Trigger Warnings and Title IX Redux,” at the 27th Annual Spring Conference on the Teaching of Writing at Old Dominion University (March 21, 2016); she will participate in the panel “Literary Foremothers and Filling the Gaps” at the AWP Annual Conference in Los Angeles on April 1, 2016.  She has both a flash fiction (“Dear Torso, Stone-carved”) and a poem (“The Apparatus of the Dark”) forthcoming in the 2017 anthology Memoirs of the Feminine Divine, edited by Andrea Fekete and Lara Lillibridge.

The Book of the MandolinAnne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, will be published by B Ink Books on April 1st. You can watch the book trailer here.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry ’12; also ex-faculty) is in the midst of a Canada-wide tour for Let the Empire Down, her second collection with Biblioasis. An interview with Alexandra recently appeared in The Windsor Star. Alexandra begins her PhD (English and Critical Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, ’12) has started a podcast about love on an island (because she lives on an island in Alaska!), along with three radio-minded friends. Listen to the first episode here.

Sean Robinson’s (Popular Fiction, W’14) story “He Who Makes the Slippers,” a fairy tale written his first day at Stonecoast, was published in Mirror Dance. Sean also presented a paper at ICFA (International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts), “Ossomancing the Siren,” which started as his third semester project and has grown since then. He is also in the middle of his second semester as a Teaching Lecturer at Plymouth State University where he’s teaching writing and fairy tales and having a blast.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was one of three finalists in the Rose Metal Press Chapbook Contest for her CNF manuscript, Tuck the Story Away (judged by Ira Sukrungruang​). A narrative essay, ​”Jersey Nights on Broadway,” is running on the NYC story site, Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood.

9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webBeyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be released on April 5! Anne K. Ross is the pen name of a 2007 Creative Nonfiction graduate. For more information, visit the website.

Kathleen Saville‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey will be published by Arcade Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, in January 2017. She’s very excited, as you can imagine. While at Stonecoast, she worked with Cait Johnson, Barbara Hurd, and Debra Marquart on parts of her book; their guidance inspired her as did the wonderful Stonecoast environment.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) just released her collaborative audio fiction-music album Strange Monsters, funded through Kickstarter. The album features six of her previously published short stories read by actors and threaded with original musical compositions. The album is currently available through CDBaby here.

Julie VanDeKreke‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) work will be featured in the Spring Equinox 2016 edition of Mused: The Bella Online Literary Review, with one nonfiction piece, one poem, and two photos.

Christopher Varlack (Creative Nonfiction/Poetry, S’10) successfully passed his dissertation defense at Morgan State University this March with his PhD in English to be conferred this May.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) published his critical essay “Self-Speaking World” on experiments in autobiography in the Spring issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies. This started as a third semester project with Debra Marquart and then became part of his final residency presentation.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has a story, “Deanie’s House,” in Waypoints, Issue 2.

FACULTY

51RmY3JvlzL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_Susan Conley’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) photo/story book collaboration Stop Here This Is The Place: A Year In Motherland will be published April 14th. The book traces the year in the life of each of the collaborators’ children on their street in Maine and celebrates motherhood and simply being a kid. Real Simple Magazine will do a feature on Stop Here in April as well as Donwneast Magazine, The Portland Press Herald, and other media outlets. The book launch party will take place on Thursday, May 5th, from 5:30-8:00 p.m. at the Portland Museum of Art, and all in the Stonecoast greater community are welcome. An additional reading will take place on May 19th at Longfellow Books in Portland.

Tantor Audio has acquired the audio rights to David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) next novel, The Risen: A Novel of Spartacus. Steven Crossley is doing the narration and the audiobook will pub at the same time as the book, May 3rd.

In February, PBS NewsHour featured Martín Espada (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) and his new book of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. Check out both the television story and the online reading.

April’s a busy month for Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction). He’ll be on several panels at the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival in New Orleans as well as reading from new work there. He’s also judging the Bethesda Magazine Teen Fiction Contest as well as the Green Briar Review fiction contest. Finally, if you’re in the DC area, you can catch his class “Breaking Through Writer’s Block” at legendary Politics & Prose bookstore.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute play Houston will be part of the Students’ Short Play Festival at the Community College of Rhode Island, Liston Campus (One Hilton St.- Room 1120; 401.455.6116), April 20-23 at 7:30 p.m. and April 23-24 at 2:00 p.m.

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51ggQvO+PtL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Debra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) essay “The Perils of Travel” was published in Paris, Etc., a new anthology that explores what Paris means to writers who have visited and lived in this fascinating city.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to be on the writing faculty at the Hobart Book Village Festival of Women Writers 2016, co-founded by Breena Clarke; please visit the new blog and website for information and consider signing up for September in the beautiful “book reading capital of America.”

Reunite with some Stonecoast alums, and learn lots in the process at Bay Path University’s 13th Writers’ Day on the Longmeadow, MA, campus on April 16th. Stonecoast alumna Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) will be speaking on “Image Gold Rush: Mining Photographs for Narratives,” and alumna Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, ’04) talk will focus on “Liars, Criminals, and Lovers: The World of the Story/Fiction 101.” Stonecoast faculty member Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), Bay Path’s writer-in-residence and director of writing programs, will be there to greet you.

A full production of “Mags: A Conversation with an Audience,” based on Suzanne Strempek Shea’s book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, will be staged at the Majestic Theater in West Springfield, MA, June 9-12. Tickets go on sale in May. The Majestic was the site of the first reading of the play back in November. A reading of the play also will be held July 27 at the Bee Hive Theater in Dingle, Co. Kerry, Ireland, the adopted home town of Mags Riordan, subject of This Is Paradise and founder of the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Cape Maclear, Malawi. Connemara actor Tegolin Knowland will portray Mags. Both events will benefit the Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic, which saves lives daily in a remote area that once had a single doctor for 800,000 residents.

In the wake of her essay on Portland in the 1970s that ran in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne has been sought for more quotes on the city’s scene way back when. The Bangor Daily News includes Suzanne in this piece.

Suzanne is also spending a lot of time these days cheering on her husband Tommy, whom some Stonecoasters might have met at residencies along the way. A former award-winning journalist who once covered the Red Sox (quite a job for a Yankees fan), Tommy has co-authored Dingers: The 101 Most Memorable Home Runs in Baseball History. To be released April 6 by Sports Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, and co-written by Joshua Shifrin, the book tells the stories of the authors’ choices of the top 100 homers and how each affected the game of baseball. Details are at www.tommysheastadium.com

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates March 2016

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled her flash “What the Dollhouse Said” was chosen as a top ten by Mocha Memoirs Press for their Women in Horror anthology. Furthermore, her poem “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear in issue 20 of Eye to the Telescope Magazine. Stonecoast is still one of the best things that has ever happened to her and she gives thanks for each of you every day.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “The Woman in the Woods”—a story that concerns itself with disasters, orphan trains, and siblings—can be found in the online journal Necessary Fiction. Episode 421 of starshipsofa-logoStarShipSofa also came out in February and features Julie’s narration of Fiona Moore’s story “The Metaphor.”

Elaine R. Flory (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been accepted to and is attending Green Mountain College’s MS in Environmental Studies program with a concentration in Writing and Communications. Living in Jamestown, NY, she is currently seeking a local volunteer position in an environmentally oriented nonprofit organization. Still pursuing creative writing as well, Elaine is looking forward to joining Pennwriters in the spring, and she plans on debuting some of her new eco-fiction at a weekly Pennwriters critique group in nearby Erie, PA.

A review of Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) was published in the January/February 2016 issue of Women’s Review of Books.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short fiction piece, “Mag-Lite,” will be featured in the upcoming issue of the Chiron Review.

Let the Empire DownAlexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry ’12, also ex-faculty) second trade collection Let the Empire Down will be released through Biblioasis this spring and will be supported by a cross-Canada tour, including stops in Toronto, Mississauga, Kingston, Windsor, Peterborough and Vancouver. Poems of Alexandra’s have recently appeared in Partisan and the anthology Best Canadian Poetry 2015 (Tightrope Books). On a different note, Alexandra will be embarking on her PhD studies (in English and Cultural Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) has started a new podcast with friends in Sitka, AK. The podcast is called Meet the Love Dorks and is all about finding love on a remote Alaskan island! You can find the show here.

The U.K.’s Venture Press has now e-published Michaela Roessner-Herman’s (Popular Fiction, S’08) second book, Vanishing Point, a science fiction novel set in the San Jose, CA, area, primarily in the Winchester Mystery house.

Richard SquiresRichard Squires (Fiction, S’14) published three stories last year: “The Best Friends Anyone Could Want” is in Upender: Art of Consequence; “The Soldier’s Relief” is in the Summer 2015 issue of The MacGuffin; and “Jews Don’t Believe in Hell” is in The Jewish Literary Journal.

The new trailer for Jacob Strunk‘s (Fiction, W’07) feature documentary The Green Standard debuted Super Bowl Sunday. You can see it here. And please follow the Facebook page for updates and festival information throughout the year.

Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) has recently been given the honor of winning the Dana Award in Fiction for the first forty pages of her novel, Escalante Moon. Receiving notification on her birthday was the greatest gift ever!

Julie VanDeKreke (Scharf) (Creative Nonfiction, S’10, best class ever!) will have her work featured in this upcoming publication of Mused: Online Literary Review, including two photographs, one poem, and a short nonfiction piece titled “Daddy’s Flowers.”

STUDENTS

Edge of Dark CoverBrenda Cooper‘s (Fiction) book Edge of Dark is a finalist for the Phillip K. Dick award for distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States. The award will be announced at Norwescon on March 25th in Seattle, WA. For more about the award, see http://www.philipkdickaward.org.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was featured in a February 27th article in UK newspaper The Guardian on why women writing about violence and sex is still considered transgressive, and she spoke at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK, on the future of the novella as a literary form. Her recent reviews include Charlie Jane Anders’ All the Birds in the Sky for The Los Angeles Times, and works by Peter Straub, Glen Hirschberg, and Victor Lavalle for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. On April 1, she will be at the Rubin Museum in New York City as part of Brainwave 2016, an annual series which pairs artists with neuroscientists for onstage conversations about consciousness and creativity—she and Dr. Carl Bazil will discuss parasomnia and the nature of fear. Hand’s forthcoming novel, Hard Light, has just received strong advance reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly.

Dark ShadowsLook Homeward, Vampire,” the Dark Shadows essay that Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) wrote for Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s upcoming MacFarland book on soap operas is online at Elizabeth’s website, Celebrities in Disgrace.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) craft essay, “Tell It Cool: On Writing with Restraint,” is forthcoming the Spring issue of The New Ohio Review (Issue #19). She has co-edited an anthology of flash sequences with Robert Alexander and Eric Braun. Nothing to Declare: A Guide to the Flash Sequence (forthcoming from northingtodeclarecoverWhite Pine Press on April 12th, 2016) is a ground-breaking anthology of cross-genre work that includes linked prose poems, narrative sequences, lyrical essays, koans, fairy tales, and epistolary addresses. It contains the work of over fifty writers, including Nin Andrews, Jennifer Kwon Dobbs, Marie Harris, Jim Harrison, Gian Lombardo, Julie Marie Wade, and Gary Young. Also, Debra’s poem “Small Buried Things” has been published in Fracture: Essays, Poems and Stories on Fracking in America, co-edited by Taylor Brorby and Stefanie Brook Trout, recently published by Ice Cube Press. Fracture brings together a choir of established and emerging writers, giving voice to the complexities of hydraulic fracturing across the United States. During a time in which so much information is known about fracking, art is needed to move the public consciousness and national conversation towards better land practices.

DownEastCover_1603-1200-462x580In an essay in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) looks back on the pre-cool Portland she knew as an art school student in the 1970s. She thanks those who offered comments after she read an early draft of this at the January residency. Suzanne also is looking forward to the thirteenth Writers’ Day at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA, where she is writer in residence. The April 16th day of lectures on writing and publishing will include presentations by Stonecoast alums Bunny Goodjohn and Lisa C. Taylor. Both authors’ books, including Bunny’s newest novel The Beginning Things and Lisa’s new short story collection Growing a New Tail, will be available for sale throughout the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates February 2016

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is ecstatic to announce she has signed a contract with a small press for her 26k word novella “Swift for the Sun” (historical pirate adventure/romance) which will be released under a pseudonym in the first quarter of 2017. It’s the biggest advance and largest royalties percentage she’s ever signed for and she’s very excited. Furthermore, Karen’s poem “NeverNever Holes,” originally published on Zingara Poet, will be reprinted in a forthcoming Love Poems anthology edited by Johnny M. Tucker, Jr. Also, the second issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring nonfiction by Stonecoast alumnus Adam Gallardo and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction, for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

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Space Heart,” an essay by Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11), appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of Solstice Literary Magazine. Her poem “Flowering” was re-published in A Year of Being Here. In February, she will be an Associate Artist under writer David Shields at the residency program of the Atlantic Center for the Arts. From there, she will go to Foundation Obras in Portugal for a three-week residency.

Isthmus-issue-4-e1452206003965Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “Holes in Heaven”—a story that concerns itself with sibling rivalry, stellar nurseries, and exiled children—can be found in the print journal Isthmus; an excerpt is available online. Issue 21 of the Small Beer podcast also came out in January and features Julie’s narration of Mary Rickert’s story “Cold Fires.”

Nikki Flionis (Fiction, ’10) is among many long-time Bostonians reflecting on their lives in Streets of Echoes, the latest volume in the City of Boston’s memoir project series. Developed in collaboration with Grubstreet, this volume includes residents of Back Bay, Fenway, Beacon Hill-West End, and Dorchester. Flionis’ essay, “Rooms with Adieu,” focuses on the old rooming house culture, wiped out with stunning speed by the advent of the residential condominium in the 1980’s.

_6757124Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Maine author and former Pushcart winner Jennifer Lunden in December 2015. And 2016 is off to a grand start: Penny’s book Postcards from Here is now available for order.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry/Artistic Collaboration, W’08) was awarded the first Oregon Literary Fellowship for Writers of Color in 2016. Her debut poetry collection, the small claim of bones, placed second in the 2015 International Latino Book Awards, and she was selected by Poets & Writers Magazine as a 2014 Notable Debut Poet.

Joe M McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) short story “Snowbird” appears in the March 2016 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to have her essay “Seduction” included in Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, an anthology to be released by Ice Cube Press later this month. Fracture explores the well-known and little-known complexities of fracking through first-hand experience, investigative journalism, storytelling, and verse. The collection will also feature the work of Stonecoast faculty Debra Marquart, former Stonecoast faculty Barbara Hurd, and several other acclaimed environmental writers. The book can be pre-ordered here.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) essay “Sound and Fury, Signifying” appeared in Synaesthesia Magazine in January. Another CNF piece, “​Gray,” received honorable mention in the 2015​ Our Past Loves contest and 9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webis now posted online (scroll down). ​Lisa has ​been invited to present a craft seminar at HippoCamp 2016​: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA, in August​. ​Conference registration is now open.​ Lisa’s humor essay, “The Long Pink Line,” has been accepted for Flash Nonfiction Funny.

Anne K. Ross’s (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) book Beyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be published on April 5, 2016, by Leatherback Press.

Tripping Back Blue coverKara Storti‘s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Tripping Back Blue, will be released on April 1st by CarolRhoda Lab, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about Finn, a 17-year-old full of paradoxes. He’s a drug dealer, but he’s scoring money to send his twin sister to Harvard. He’s desperate to shoot up even though he’s the most popular kid in Dammertown. He’s a philosopher and orator who’s failing all his classes. The only time he finds peace is when he’s bird-watching. Finn’s life begins to spiral out of control, until he discovers a miracle drug called indigo. Finn is convinced that the drug is the way out of everything broken in his life. But is it really as magical as it seems?

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) stories “Feeding the Skeleton Cats” and “Tornado Season” appeared in Eleven ElevenHer story “The Damaged,” originally published in Interzone, appeared on the podcast StarShipSofa. “Skeletons,” originally in Room, was reprinted on the LGBTQ podcast Glittership.

Olive Sullivan (Fiction/Cross-Genre Poetry, S’15) is the editor of a new fine arts magazine produced by students in the Department of Communication at Missouri Southern State University, where Sullivan is an assistant professor. The magazine, Vivid, hosted a launch party January 22nd in downtown Joplin. The website is www.vividfinearts.com. Here is a link to a TV news feature about the launch.

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grimmdj-front-finalBoskone 53, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, will feature among their program participants Stonecoast faculty James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss as well as alumnae Julie C. Day and Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09). This year Erin Underwood is serving as Program Head for Boskone, and she was recently appointed as Chair for next year’s convention. Join us in Boston, MA from February 19-21, 2016, and visit the Boskone website for membership information. The Grimm Future, edited by popular fiction alumna Erin Underwood, will be released in February 2016 by NESFA Press and will be featured as this year’s Boskone book. The Grimm Future is a new science fiction anthology of reimagined Grimm fairy tales that features original fiction by 14 of today’s most exciting authors including Stonecoast faculty member Nancy Holder and alumna Sandra McDonald.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) marks a return to songwriting with a new record deal and a new album! Preacher Boy – The National Blues is now available direct from Altco Recordings, or on iTunes and other digital music services

An Unfinished Story about Eagles,” by Rick Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05), appears in the latest edition of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. His blog, The Geriatric Pilgrim, now comes out twice a month.

FACULTY

kanth3Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) review of Garth Greenwell’s novel What Belongs to You appeared in the New York Times Book Review.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new story titled “Whatever Kills in Vegas” in Kolchak: Passages of the Macabre, published by Moonstone Books.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem “Lament” has been selected by guest editor, Edward Hirsch, for inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology. The poem, “Lament,” a section of a long poem in Marquart’s recent collection, Small Buried Things, addresses the ravages of best-american-poetry-2016-9781501127557_lgfracking in her home state of North Dakota. The poem was originally published by New Letters in 2014. The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology will be published by Scribner in September 2016.

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

By request of the editors, Lisa Romeo S’08 would like to pass along this opportunity:​  Flash Nonfiction Funny, a planned collection of humorous short-short nonfiction pieces. Editors Tom Hazuka and Dinty W. Moore are soliciting submissions, 750 words maximum; both unpublished and previously published selections are welcome. Email submissions as Microsoft Word documents to either tom@tomhazuka.com or moored4@ohio.edu (not both, please).

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Community News & Updates December 2015

ALUMS

Moon DarkPatricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) is excited to announce that her paranormal historical romance, Moon Dark, Book One of The Auriano Curse series, will be released on December 8, 2015, by Lachesis Publishing. This was her graduation thesis, so she is grateful to any Stonecoasters who laid eyes on it and helped get it to the final version.

The audiobook of Jennifer Marie Brissett’s (Popular Fiction, S ’11) novel Elysium has been released and is available via Audible as well as well as other venues that carry audiobooks. The narrator is Jamye Méri Grant, the director is Claire Bloom, and the producers are Skyboat Media and Blackstone Audio; it was edited, mixed and mastered by Jim Freund.Elysium

Emma Bouthillette (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) is pleased to announce her book proposal Biddeford: A Brief History has been accepted by The History Press. The South Carolina-based press is focused on preserving local American heritage. Born and raised in Biddeford, Emma is thrilled to tell the rich story of her community from its settlement to present day. The book’s anticipated publish date is May 2017.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Florida Miracles” is now available in Interzone 261.
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Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was delighted that her short story “Stars Come Down” appeared and was fabulously illustrated in issue #4 of Saltfront, “an arts and literary journal for a radically new type of ecological storytelling.”

LeftSideLifeDana Robbins’ (Poetry, W’13) first book of poetry, The Left Side of My Life, has been published by Moon Pie Press of Westbrook, ME.

Venture Press, a new science fiction and fantasy imprint of Endeavour Press, the U.K.’s leading independent digital publisher, will be reprint e-publishing Michaela Roessner‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) second novel, Vanishing Point, in early 2016.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Front Porch Journal for her essay, “Your Boyfriend’s Back.”  She also has a new flash essay this month in Word Riot, “The List of Alternative Theories.”

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular fiction, S’13) has signed with Ann Collette of Rees Literary to represent her and her first novel, The Last Siren. Bonnie first met Ann at the Stonecoast agent session during her graduation residency. Bonnie’s stories “Sleeping with Spirits” and “A Careful Fire” are now both online for free reading. Her stories “Husband Wife Lover” and “The Centaur’s Daughter” appeared in the most recent issues of PRISM International and A cappella Zoo, respectively.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) has accepted the position of Senior Writer for Udacity, an innovative online education provider on a mission to democratize education through its flagship Nanodegree programs and a rich library of free courses ranging from web development and machine learning to entrepreneurship and marketing.

FACULTY

Manhattan Review Cover 001Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) has four poems and a review essay, “Discoveries Abroad,” published in the new issue of The Manhattan Review. Her essay includes a review of Harry Clifton, who visited the SC Ireland Residency in Dingle in July. To celebrate the launch of the magazine, Jeanne Marie will be reading with Baron Wormser and Bitite Vinklers on December 5th in New York. If you are nearby, the reading starts at 7:00 pm and will take place at Spectrum, 121 Ludlow Street on the Lower East Side. It would be great to see some SCers there. Jeanne Marie will also be taking part in the launch of the anthology Rabbit Ears: TV Poems at the Bowery Poetry Club on December 14th at 6:30 pm. She will be reading her poem “A Munsters’ Breakfast” along with other contributors. Bowery Poetry Club is at 306 Bowery in Manhattan.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” appears in the current issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

A round-up of recent news from Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry):

  • Debra’s poem, “Traveling with Guitar,” was featured in the American Life in Poetry series on Monday, November 23.  The ALP series, curated by Ted Kooser, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former US Poet Laureate, appears as a regular column in newspapers in over 70 countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Peru, Mexico, Bangladesh, Uganda, Indonesia, Korea, Nepal, India, Egypt, Turkey, The Philippines, Viet Nam, China, most of Europe, Canada, and the U.K., as well as U.S. readers from Maine to Hawaii with an estimated readership of 3,500,000 each week.
  • smallburiedthingsHer poem “Kablooey is the Sound You’ll Hear” was nominated for a 2015 Pushcart Prize by New Rivers Press. Both poems were published in Marquart’s latest poetry collection, Small Buried Things (New Rivers Press, 2015).
  • Her essay “When the Band Broke Up” has been awarded the 2016 Alligator Juniper Nonfiction Prize. The award includes a $1,000 honorarium and publication.  The essay, which is part of Marquart’s in-progress memoir, Schizophonia: Notes on a Life in Music, will be published in Alligator Juniper’s issue XX in 2016.
  • northdakotaiseverywhereanthologyDebra was invited to read at the North Dakota Museum of Art at the University of North Dakota on October 23, 2015 to celebrate the publication of North Dakota is Everywhere:  An Anthology of Contemporary North Dakota Poets, published by the North Dakota Center for Regional Studies in 2015.
  • She also read from her work and participated in a panel, “Writing the Environment,” at the South Dakota Festival of the Book in Deadwood, SD,  September 23-27, 2015.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) have a publication date for the anthology they are co-editing on Soap Operas, featuring works from Stonecoasters Aaron Hamburger and Nancy Holder and SC alums Susan Lilley and Tigh Rickman, among others. The book will be published by McFarland Press in March of 2017. Stay tuned!

 

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Community News & Updates February 2015

ALUMNI

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) is happy to announce that Medallion Press has acquired his novel The Time Train. It will be released in 2016.

Jennifer Marie Brissett‘s (Popular Fiction S’11) debut novel Elysium has been listed as a Locus New and Notable Book and also has been nominated for the 2014 Philip K. Dick Award. She will be reading and signing with Carlos Hernandez at the NYRSF Reading Series in SoHo on February 3rd.

13coverimage Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Church of Forgotten Gods” is out in the latest issue of the magazine A cappella Zoo.

Terri Glass’s (Creative Nonfiction / Poetry, S’13) haiku chapbook, Birds, Bees, Trees, Love, Hee Hee will be forthcoming from Finishing Line Press in mid-March. Cait Johnson states, “Glass delivers her crystalline observations of nature—and of being human—with incisive thrust and an unexpected wry humor. I could spend hours happily inhabiting these beautiful miniature worlds, each so alive, so sensual, so ultimately delicious. Like gems shining with concentrated brilliance, here we find language and insight distilled to the bone.” To order, click here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) recently enjoyed having her first flash fiction publication at Stirring: A Literary Collection. She’d love for you to read “Speaking in English, Speaking in Sudanese” here. Her memoir piece, “Saudade,” which was originally published in the Stonecoast Review, will be reprinted in Hippocampus Magazine in May 2015. Her email is lesleyheiser@yahoo.com.

Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is a 2014 Julie Suk Award finalist for best poetry book by an independent press.

Flowers-COVERIt has been a busy six months for Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10). Leaving Ashwood, the final book in the dystopian Ashwood trilogy, was released by North Star Press. In December, Calumet Editions released The High Cost of Flowers, a literary novel. The opening chapters of this book were reviewed in workshop sessions at Stonecoast. The High Cost of Flowers follows a family adapting to the rapid decline of its matriarch from heart disease and dementia.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold the short story “Farmer” to Analog Magazine, an excerpt of an unpublished novel.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) sold the story “The Cthulhu Navy Wife,” a Lovecraftian mash-up, to the anthology The Mammoth Book of Cthulhu for publication later this year. She tweets about markets, writing tips, and more @sandramcdonald.

22999456Ellen Meeropol‘s (Fiction, W’06) second novel, On Hurricane Island, will launch on March 3 at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA, with events scheduled in Massachusetts, Virginia, New York, Texas, Minneapolis, and Calfifornia (full event schedule here). Former Stonecoast faculty member Walter Wetherell writes that “Meeropol takes on the complexities and dangers of contemporary life in a novel that starts fast and ratchets up the tension all the way to the end.” On Hurricane Island can be pre-ordered from Red Hen Press.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) has an untitled poem in Caliban Online 18.

Michaela Roessner-Herman (Popular Fiction, S’08) just wrapped up a year of serving as one of the judges on the 2014 Philip K. Dick science fiction award panel.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) had three original stories out in January: “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth” in Lightspeed (cross-published on io9), “Everything Beneath You” in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and “Nostalgia” in Interzone“The Damaged” was reprinted in Story; it first appeared in the January 2014 issue of Interzone. Her story “Six Ways to Break Her” appeared on SmokeLong Quarterly, accompanied by her mother’s artwork.

STUDENTS

David Arroyo‘s (Poetry) poem “Eve’s Cheeseburger” was published in the January issue of Stirring.

FACULTY

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) and Annie Deppe will be giving a reading on 12 February at 7:00 p.m., Breck Suite, Wright Hall, Bay Path University, Longmeadow, MA (free and open to the public). On 14 February, Ted will give a talk on writing titled “Taking it All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous,” at Bay Path’s Writer’s Day from 11:05 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.  On Thursday 5 March at 7:00 p.m., Ted and Annie will give a reading at Trinity House, at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, FL (free and open to the public).  On Wednesday 25 March, at 8:00 p.m. Ted and Annie will read at the Maier Museum of Art, 1 Quinlan Street, Randolph College, Lynchburg, VA (free and open to the public).

1-Marquart_Small Buried Things_2015Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem, “Lament,” was published in New Letters Magazine (Issue 81.1) in December of 2014 and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She was awarded the 2014 Paumanok Poetry Award from Farmingdale State College, New York, and in November 2014 she read from her prize-winning work at the college. She was invited by the North Dakota Humanities Council to travel in North Dakota for six weeks in January and February of 2015 to do field research and teach creative writing workshops in several communities impacted by the oil boom.  The name of the project is Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015. Debra’s poetry collection, Small Buried Things, will be published by New Rivers Press in March of 2015.

Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015.

Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015.

 

DumpedCoverElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) joins fellow Stonecoasters Kristabelle Munson, Alexis Paige, Judith Podell, Penny Guisinger and Julie L. Vandekreke as contributing authors in the new anthology Dumped: Stories of Women Unfriending Women, which is now available as a pre-order on Amazon and which was reviewed as “gripping from beginning to end” on MomsRising. Watch for news of an AWP reading for this anthology:  www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) looks forward to welcoming Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Mass., where they’ll visit classes for a week. The university, where Suzanne is writer in residence, well host a reading by both Ted and Annie Feb. 12 at 7:00 p.m. in Breck Suite on campus. The event is free and open to the public. Copies of books by both Ted and Annie will be sold.

On Feb. 14, Ted will speak on “Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous” at  the university’s eleventh Writers’ Day. Other speakers will include Stonecoast alum Penny Guisinger, who’ll talk about grant writing, and former Stonecoast faculty member Roland Merullo, who’ll talk about conquering the demons of the blank page. Information including schedule, fees and how to register is available at http://www.baypath.edu/news-and-events/writers-day

The Irish Times recently published an essay by Suzanne and an excerpt from her book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, and African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, about the work of Irishwoman Mags Riordan and the medical clinic she founded in Malawi in memory of a son who drowned there. Southern Maine readers interested in meeting Mags Riordan are invited to the Maine Irish Heritage Center, at the corner of State and Gray Streets in Portland, March 24 at 7:00 p.m. Mags will give and update on the clinic. Copies of This Is Paradise and craft items from Malawi will be offered for sale. The center will be charging a $5 admission fee.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Via Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction): Stonecoast Reviewa journal edited and produced by students at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, is now accepting submissions of literary fiction, popular fiction, nonfiction and poetry, for their third and fourth issues. Emerging and established writers welcome. (Deadline: revolving)

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates June 2014

ALUMNI NEWS

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction / Cross Genre, S’13) has signed a contract for two more novels in her Animals in Focus series from Midnight Ink. The first book, Drop Dead on Recall (2012), was named Best Fiction Book of the year by the Dog Writers Association of America. Book two, The Money Bird, came out last fall, and the third, Catwalk, will be released this coming October. Also, Sheila has had a poem accepted for publication in Written River: A Journal of Eco-Poetics; “Spin” will appear in the July issue.

FloridaRWA_-_finalMichael L. Joy‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story of geriatric adventure and intrigue, “Portrait Conspiracy,”  will appear in an anthology from Melange Press called From Florida with Love, which comes out as an ebook on June 5th and in print at a later date (and will be available on Amazon). All proceeds support the South West Florida Romance Writers.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) is under contract with Obsidian Entertainment to write the Collector’s Edition book for their much-anticipated game Pillars of Eternity. You can read more about it here.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two essays published in May: “The Mother as She Writes” in Literary Mama and “Memento Mori: On Collecting Baby Teeth” in Mutha Magazine.

17247288Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) collection In Search Of and Others has been nominated for a Shirley Jackson Award for “outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror, and the dark fantastic.”

Jeanette Lynes (Poetry/Fiction, ’05) presented a talk on poetic responses to the poet John Clare at the “John Clare in Space” conference held at Oxford-Brookes University in England on May 30th. Jeanette’s poetry collection, School of Flowers: The John Clare Poems, will be published by Wolsak and Wynn in 2016.

Lightspeed_49_June_2014J.M. McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) much anticipated final Dogsland novel, We Leave Together, comes out in June from WordHorde.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) essay “Stepping through a Portal” is out in Lightspeed: Women Destroy Science Fiction! today. Her story “Sleepers” is in the most recent issue of Interzone.

FACULTY NEWS

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) has two poems in the new issue of Gulf Coast, one of which, “Lotto,” is also posted on their website.

Boman Desais (Fiction) flash fiction, “The Boy from Chicago,” won first prize in the Writer’s Billboard competition for the month of April and will be posted at this link until July 1st.

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has a couple of events before the July residency. At the Squam Arts Workshops (June 4th-8th) he’ll be leading a series of workshops called “Story in a Day,” and he’ll be teaching at Mary Robinette Kowal’s Writing the Other Workshop and Retreat (June 9th-15th).

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) essay “A ‘Shortcut to Europe’ in D.C.? Not Quite” appeared in The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) reviews of Emma Donoghue’s Frog Music, Stacey D’Erasmo’s Wonderland, and Lauren Owen’s The Quick all recently appeared in The Los Angeles Times. In June, Hand will be writer-in-residence at the Norton Island Residency, and later that month she’ll be a guest instructor at the Odyssey Writing Workshop.

Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) co-edited a special “Sense of Place” issue of On Second Thought for the North Dakota Humanities Council. Marquart’s essay “Carte Blanche,” with some of her thoughts on the oil boom, was included in the issue.

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) sends many thanks to all of the Portland-area Stonecoasters and staff who attended her reading at Harmon’s and Barton’s in the city May 22. The event was set up by the also-much-appreciated Barbara Kelly of “Kelly’s Books to Go,” which that night sold copies of Suzanne’s new book, This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight an the Medical Clinic that Brought Fresh Hope to Both. Suzanne will continue on the book promotion trail this month, at events including

  • June 5 – 7:oo p.m. – Workshop 13 Cultural Arts & Learning Center, 13 Church Street, Ware, MA.
  • June 8 – 2:00 p.m. – Bay Path College, 588 Longmeadow Street, Longmeadow, MA
  • June 11 – 6:30 p.m. – East Longmeadow Public Library, 60 Center Square, East Longmeadow, MA
  • June 14 – 4:00 p.m. – Poetry Center, Wright HallSmith College, Northampton, MA
  • June 16 – 7:00 p.m. – Fiske Free Library, 108 Broad Street, Claremont, NH
  • June 21 – 2:00 p.m. – Booklovers’ Gourmet, 55 East Main Street, Webster, MA
  • June 22 – 1:00 p.m. – Write Your Mind, 21 Westminster Terrace, Cape Elizabeth, ME (with Helen Peppe and Richard Hoffman)
  • June 28 – 12:00 p.m. – Hampden Public Library, 625 Main Street, Hampden, MA

Suzanne sends no thanks to the Montreal Canadiens, who recently dashed the Boston Bruins’ Stanley Cup hopes. She does thank Elizabeth Searle and Celebrities in Disgrace for posting an essay by Suzanne on her childhood fixation with the Bruins and a certain defenseman. Finally, she thanks all who’ve registered for Iota: The Conference of Short Prose, which will run August 14-17 on Campobello Island, New Brunswick. Suzanne will lead a fiction workshop while Barbara Hurd works with nonfiction writers and Charles Coe with poets. For full information, including how to register for any of the workshops, visit the website.

10435988_10152768137620166_5532781654350973656_n

Stonecoast grads and current students chat (and display their souvenir Suzanne’s mother’s bookmarks) after Suzanne’s recent reading in Portland. From left: Amanda Pleau, Teal Gardella, Melanie Brooks, and Emily Young.

WORKSHOPS

Suzanne Van Dam (Fiction, S’09) is offering a weekend writing retreat July 19-20 in Copper Harbor, MI. The theme this year is “The Wandering Word.” Suzanne will be leading a prose workshop on “Travel & Life Writing” and will be teaming up with poet Laura Smyth (MFA Columbia University), who will be leading a workshop on “Poetry & Transformation.” The retreat provides additional activities designed to support the writer and the writing life—meditation, yoga, songwriting, and nature activities. Join us for two days of creative writing on the beautiful Keweenaw Penninsula. Check us out!

 

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Community News & Updates May 2014

ALUMNI NEWS

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) poem “NeverNever Holes” was published April 10 on ZingaraPoet.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) has creative nonfiction in the latest issue of Pithead Chapel. She has also wrangled a place on the Jessie duPont three-week summer-seminar series entitled “Constructing Childhood: Words and Pictures.”

Carolina Crimes coverSandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) sold the story “End of the World Community College,” a tongue-in-cheek story of apocalypse and hope, to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction for publication later this year. Visit her at www.sandramcdonald.com.

Carolina Crimes: 19 Tales of Lust, Love, and Longing, published by Wildside Press, features stories by Sisters in Crime mystery writers from the Carolinas. A book trailer can be seen here. Karen Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08) edited the stories, which includes her own “The Fourth Girl” about a recently fired teacher who inherits her aunt’s estate and finds that it comes with an unusual small business.

WhatMightNot--3x5x72In April, Steve Rhodes‘ (Poetry, W’11) second poetry collection was published by Wind. Of What Might Not Be Steve says, “This collection is a sequel to The Time I Didn’t Know What to Do Next. I’m trying to ponder those moments and places where the possible rubs up against the unlikely, where the boundary between ‘is’ and ‘might or might not be’ becomes blurred. I very much appreciate what Ted Deppe says about this collection: ‘These poems wonder at our being here at all.'”

Michaela Roessner-Herman (Popular Fiction, S’08) has been asked to contribute to an upcoming Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America Cookbook—the third that SFWA has produced, this time as part of SFWA’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2015. Michaela has previously provided recipes for two other genre-related cookbooks, both of which where fundraisers for the Tiptree Award: Her Smoke Rose Up from Supper and The Bakery Men Don’t See.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) flash essay “Coffee Regular,” an excerpt from her memoir-in-essays manuscript, appeared in the March issue of Gravel Magazine. Lisa was interviewed recently for The Writer’s Hot Seat section of the Barnstorm Journal blog. She would like to remind all in the Stonecoast community that she extends an open invitation to feature your guest post at her blog to help support your book or other creative project.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) will be presenting a workshop on “Going into Dark Places: Taboos in Writing” at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in Salem on May 3, 2014, at the Hawthorne Hotel. A recent interview with Lisa is in the online edition of The Worcester Review; her poem “Cathedral of Shadows” was published there in March. Also, she has new fiction appearing in Bartleby Snopes online and Mulberry Fork Review online.

Adrienne S. Wallner (Poetry, W’09) has accepted a position as a Wilderness Instructor with New Vision Wilderness, a wilderness immersion therapy and education program in northern Wisconsin. Some writing-specific work she will be doing with clients includes therapeutic journaling, poetry, ekphrasis, and nature writing. She is very excited to start her new position in September. (Those of you who spoke with her at AWP—yes, this is the job she was talking about!).

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) is thrilled to see her story “The Cozy Corner” in volume three of The New Guard. The story, excerpted from her Stonecoast creative thesis, was a finalist for the Machigonne Fiction Contest.

FACULTY NEWS

Boman Desai‘s (Fiction) novel The Lesbian Man was shortlisted for the Dana Award for novels. The first chapter of the same novel won first place in a competition of first chapters late last year.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Honeymoon for One” (which he read at the last residency) is in the new issue of Subtropics.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) essay “Saved by Obamacare,” about her experience with the Affordable Care Act, appeared in Salon.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a story in Dead But Not Forgotten: Stories from the World of Sookie Stackhouse. The Anthology will be released first by Audible on May 13, with hardcover and e-book releases in November. She is also an Author Guest of Honor at the World Horror Convention May 8-11 in Portland, OR.

BEST SFF 8Three new appearances in print this month for Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction): “The Pope of the Chimps” in The Book of Silverberg, edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schafer published on May 1; “Bernardo’s House,” a stand-alone e-book in English and Italian from Roman publisher Future Fiction; and “The Promise of Space” in The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eight, edited by Jonathan Strahan, due on May 18. His super-hero story “The Biggest,” originally commissioned by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, has been recorded for the podcast Starship Sofa Episode 334. Jim has adapted “The Promise of Space” for the stage and it will appear this fall in the anthology Geek Theater: 12 Plays by Science Fiction and Fantasy Masters, edited by Jen Gunnels and Stonecoast alumna Erin Underwood.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) monologues “Nightmare Girl” and “Career Day” took first prize in the Maine Playwrights Festival’s Monologathon. His full-length play Duck and Cover was voted Audience Favorite in Dezart Performs Play Reading Series (Palm Springs, CA), and the play will be fully staged in January 2015. The Players’ Ring (Portsmouth, NH) has announced that Mike’s Edgar-nominated play “Ghosts of Ocean House” will run for three weeks in October 2014.

dezart announcement

prprairie-gold-coverDebra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) essay “Not All There” appeared in Prairie Gold: An Anthology of the American Heartland. Her poem “Kablooey Is the Sound You’ll Hear” was published in The Normal School: A Literary Magazine. Also, Debra traveled inside the North Dakota oil boom under a grant from the North Dakota Humanities Council during November of 2013. She taught writing workshops in thirteen communities impacted by the oil boom for a research project. Read about her first impressions of this fast-moving environmental story inside the Bakken oil boom here.

A Month Inside the Oil Boom: the North Dakota highway leading into the Badlands.

A Month Inside the Oil Boom: the North Dakota highway leading into the Badlands (photo provided by Debra Marquart).

Alexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry, ’12) book Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway has been shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award, given for the best book of poetry by a Canadian woman published during the previous year. The winner of this award will be announced in June. An interview with Rob McLennan on the subject of this nomination can be found here. In addition to this, Alexandra is this month’s Guest Contributor for the BANG section of The New Guard Review.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has a new short story, “The Quiet Car,” just published in Solstice literary magazine. For fellow fans of train-writing: this story takes place on an Amtrak “Quiet Car.”

this-is-paradise-coverSuzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) Portland, ME, reading from her newly released book This Is Paradise has been rescheduled to Thursday, May 22. She thanks those who first marked their calendars for May 8, then May 9. She promises this will be the last date change. The reading will be held at 6:00 p.m. at The Gallery at Harmon’s and Barton’s, 584 Congress Street. This Is Paradise is the story of the Irish woman Mags Riordan and the medical clinic she founded in the remote Malawian village where her son died while on holiday. A TV interview with Mags Riordan and Suzanne is here. A story on the book, from The Republican of Springfield, MA, is here. Suzanne will also be reading May 31 at 11:00 a.m. at Toadstool Books in Peterborough, NH, and on the same at the Toadstool store in Keene, NH, at 2:00 p.m. The books was launched April 23 at Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA, and Suzanne thanks all the Stonecoasters who attended. Two days later, Suzanne served as emcee for Bay Path College’s 19th annual Women’s Leadership Conference in Springfield, MA. Bearing the theme “Own Your Story,” the event featured television legend Barbara Walters, New York Times columnist Bruce Feiler and Syria Deeply founder Lara Setrakian, and was attended by a crowd of more than 2,000.

Author's-eye view of Broadside Bookshop launch of 'This Is Paradise.' Stonecoaster scan starts with Lisa Taylor in front row and former faculty member Leslea Newman in second row.

Author’s-eye view of Broadside Bookshop launch of This Is Paradise. Stonecoaster scan starts with Lisa Taylor in front row and former faculty member Lesléa Newman in second row.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Call for Submissions for an Anthology Celebrating the Life and Work of Bill Morrissey
This book will be edited by Bill friends and New England writers Bruce Pratt and Suzanne Strempek Shea.

Singer, songwriter, novelist, outdoorsman, raconteur, family member, friend—Bill Morrissey was many things to the many, many, many people he touched in his life. We’d like to know just who he was to you. Submit your essay to be considered for a proposed anthology that will illustrate the innumerable sides of a man who left us far too soon, and left us with so much. Whether you know him from high school, or the high stool, whether you are a friend who shared a stage with him or a fan who shared his love of small towns on the river, tell us your Bill story.

Nonfiction submissions (essays, stories, lyrics, poems, appreciations) of up to 5,000 words should be sent in Word format by August 1 to bp.manuscripts (at) gmaildot.com. Include a cover letter with full contact information and a brief description of your connection to Bill. Contract will follow acceptance.

Suzanne Strempek Shea is the author of five novels and five works of nonfiction, including the newly released This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Vllage’s Plight and the Medical Clinic that Brought Fresh Hope to Both. Her friendship with Bill sprang from their shared Polish heritage and their love of small towns on the river. Suzanne has been featured on NBC’s Today, National Public Radio and Voice of America, and in USA Today and The Washington Post. Her freelance work has appeared in The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, ESPN the Magazine, Yankee and Bark. Suzanne teaches at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program and is director of the creative writing program and writer in residence at Bay Path College in Longmeadow, MA.

Bruce Pratt is the author of the novel The Serpents of Blissfull from Mountain State Press and the poetry collection Boreal from Antrim House Books. He has won prizes and awards for his drama, short fiction, poetry, and songwriting, and his work has been published in dozens of journal and reviews in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. For twenty years he plied his trade as a singer/songwriter and for fifteen of those years traveled extensively with Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. He was a long time friend and admirer of Bill, with whom he performed on many occasions. Pratt is the editor of the Annual American Fiction Anthology from New Rivers Press. Retired from performing, Pratt teaches Creative Writing and Literature at the University of Maine and to private students.

 

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Community News & Updates February 2014

ALUMNI

Libby Cudmore (Popular Fiction, S’10) is thrilled to announce that she has accepted an offer of reprsentation from Jim McCarthy of Dystel & Goderich Literary Management.

Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) was recently interviewed by Mason’s Road, Fairfield MFA’s literary journal. He was also invited to present at Embry-Riddle University’s President’s Speaker Series on February 26th at 7:00 p.m. The event will be broadcasted on Marc Bernier’s radio show. Additional information about the event can be found here.

Melody FullerMelody Fuller (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) has accepted an invitation to attend The Symposium for Professional Wine Writers at Meadowood Napa (February 2014). This is a high honor and a testament to her assiduous work. This Symposium holds hard-to-get space for only the top writers of food and wine in the world. It is very difficult to earn a chair.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) announces “Praise the Poetry Barn,” a new initiative for her nonprofit organization, The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative, a provider of online poetry workshops. The Indiegogo campaign envisions building an energy-efficient, cooperatively run timber barn to hold poetry workshops, readings, and retreats in the Catskill Mountains of New York state. Have your name and a line of your poetry inscribed on a barn board, or claim another poetic perk of your choice, from bestselling, award-winning books to enrollment in one of our online workshops. All donations are tax-deductible to the extent provided by law.

poetry-barn

NIGHTLIFE worm 4AMatthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) is excited to be able to share the cover for the second novel in his Nightlife series, Nightlife: As the Worm Turns (Pocket Star/Simon & Schuster), which is set to be released in early October 2014 … just in time for Halloween.

The post-apocalyptic, transgender story “Fleet” by Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) was selected to appear in The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasy. It originally appeared in the collection We See a Different Frontier. Sandra also attended the January launch of the TDRS space satellite at Kennedy Space Center as a social media expert.

Lisa Romeo nov 2013 - CTwo of Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essays found homes recently. “Eyes, Hands, Hotel, Hospital” appears on Halfway Down the Stairs, and “Down at the Diner” is in the January 2014 print and digital issue of Under the Gum Tree. Both are excerpts from her memoir manuscript. An essay about finally getting a new professional photo taken (after delaying it for seven years), and mulling the meaning of a writer’s headshot, appeared on SheWrites. Lisa’s blog was included in the Best 100 Websites for Writers in 2014 at The Write Life.

Catherine Schmitt‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) article based on her Stonecoast thesis, “How the Presidents Ate Their Salmon,” appears in the winter issue of Gastronomica. A PDF can be found on her website.

Bonnie Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) has a lot of story news she’s been holding onto: Her short story “The Land of Phantom Limbs” appeared in the January issue of Flash Fiction Online. Her story “The Damaged” appears in the current issue of Interzone. Her story “The Mammoth” appeared in the December 2013 issue of Ideomancer. The flash fiction “Spiders” appeared in the December issue of The Drabblecast, a podcast zine. “Old Boys” appears in the Winter issue of The Colored Lens. All of these stories, she is happy to say, were written during her time at Stonecoast.

Gina Troisi‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) memoir, Shadows on the Sidewalk, was a Short List Finalist for the 2013 William Faulkner-William Wisdom Competition for Narrative Nonfiction. She is still looking for a home for the book. Her essay “Until the Morning Comes” was recently published in Flyway: Journal of Writing and the Environment. Her essay “Our Shadows on the Sidewalks” (from which the title of the book originated) was accepted for publication in Under the Sun, due to be released in May 2014.

Karrie Waarala‘s (Poetry, S’11) heroic crown of sonnets, “Pierce & Brand: A Sideshow Diptych,” appears in the latest issue of Mezzo Cammin (along with a spare sonnet and a villanelle for good measure).

Adrienne S. Wallner‘s (Poetry, W’09) poem “The Parable of the Butchers: Taiji Cove vs. Factory Farming” is featured on the January 22, 2014, edition of New Verse News. To see what else she has been up to, please visit her website.

STUDENTS

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction) has a short story in the March 2014 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, titled “The Redemption of Kip Banjeree.”

FACULTY

Beast in the ApartmentTony Barnstone (Poetry, Translation) just published his new book of poems, Beast in the Apartment (Sheep Meadow Press, 2014). It’s available from various distributors, directly from UPNE, Amazon, and so on. More importantly, his son, Blake William Barnstone, was born on January 14th, healthy and happy, 7 pounds, 10 ounces!

An excerpt from David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) story “Those About to Die…” is currently being featured on George R.R. Martin’s official website. It’s there to promote the forthcoming Wild Cards novel, Lowball, and includes the cover illustration of David’s character. David also contributed to the forthcoming craft book Now Write! Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror: Speculative Genre Exercises from Today’s Best Writers and Teachers, edited by Laurie Lamson and published by Archer.

A staged reading of Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Edgar-nominated stage play Ghosts of Ocean House will be performed at Mad Horse Theater, 24 Mosher Street, South Portland, ME, on Friday, February 7, at 7:30 p.m. and on Sunday, February 9, at 2:00 p.m. Pay-what-you-can tickets (a suggested $10 donation) are available at the door, cash and check only.

ghosts flyer 2014

In 2013, Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) received the following awards/honors: 2013 Wachtmeister Award for Poetry from the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts (award includes an honorarium and a one-month residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Amherst, VA); The Paumanok Poetry Award from the Visiting Writers Program at Farmingdale State College, New York; the 2013 Normal Prize for Poetry for “Kablooey Is the Sound You Hear”; short-listed for the 2013 Manchester Poetry Prize, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Also, her poem “Door-to-Door” was selected by Narrative Magazine as one of the “Top Five Poems” published by Narrative in 2013.

meeting-the-tormentors-in-safewayThe National Post recently named Alexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry, ’12) Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway one of the top four books of Canadian poetry for 2013. Kerry Clare of The 49th Shelf discusses Tormentors in this review.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) opera and rock opera about “Tonya & Nancy” are both being produced in February. In L.A., a second show has been added to the Rock Concert performance of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera at the King King Club in Hollywood, February 4-5, libretto by Elizabeth and music by Michael Teoli, produced by The Los Angeles Rock Opera Company and Harborside Films, both shows benefitting L.A.’s iconic Celebration Theater. A full run for the rock opera in L.A. is in the works. L.A. Stonecoasters please join Elizabeth and Nancy Holder at rink-side February 4th. Media coverage for the 2014 L.A. production of the Rock Opera has included featured articles on NewsOXY (ranked a “Most Popular” article), BroadwayWorld/LA, MSN, deathandtaxes.com, and an hour on Los Angeles Talk Radio: The Sheena Mateal Experience Show. Meanwhile in Minneapolis/St. Paul, the operatta group Mixed Precipitation is performing Tonya & Nancy: The Opera, Elizabeth’s one-act chamber opera with music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross on February 20 at Amsterdam Hall, the night of the Women’s Figure-Skating finals in Sochi. For updates, please visit Elizabeth’s website.

TN_Blast6 MASTER
ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE ADDED DUE TO HIGH TICKET DEMAND
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5th @ 8:00 PM

On February 15, Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) will be emceeing the ninth Writers’ Day at Bay Path College in Longmeadow, MA, an event that will include a talk by Stonecoast grad Helen Peppe on the sometimes-sticky business of writing the family. That night, she’ll introduce Liz Peavey (who’ll be speaking during the day on memoir and truth) as she presents her acclaimed one-woman show, “My Mother’s Clothes Are Not My Mother,” about mourning, sorting, and saying goodbye.

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