Tag Archives: Ed Boyle

Community News & Updates July 2020

FACULTY

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) wrote his latest piece on sports and civil rights for The Nation: “When the KKK Played Against an All-Black Baseball Team.” His next book will be for young adults and is slated for release in 2021. Doomed: The Tragic Story of Sacco & Vanzetti tells the controversial story of two Italian anarchists convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana Is Here received a Bronze Medal in the 2019 Foreword Reviews Indie Book Awards!

Elizabeth Hand’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Curious Toys is a finalist for both the Locus and Shirley Jackson Awards. The Book of Lamps and Banners, the fourth Cass Neary novel (due in September), has received great advance trade reviews, including a starred review from Booklist.  Hand recently wrote about John Garth’s The Worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien: The Places that Inspired Middle-earth for The Washington Post.

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Faithful Sister” was published in Daily Science Fiction on June 17.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is one of six writers who formed the group Writers Against Racial Injustice to raise funds for The Equal Justice Initiative. The group started with a goal of raising 10K and have wound up raising over 50K, with help from many supporters including Stonecoasters and coverage in The Boston Globe, Shelf Awareness, and a feature article on June 24 in Publishers Weekly. The fundraiser is running through July 4th; donations are welcome here.

The publication date for Robert V.S. Redick’s (Popular Fiction) new epic fantasy novel, Sidewinders (sequel to Master Assassins), has just been announced: it will be on the shelves on May 4, 2021, from Talos Press.

 

ALUMS

One of Jillian Abbott’s (Popular Fiction, S’04) students, Hastride Eduoard, was profiled for the animation project she submitted for her final project in Jillian’s ENG 384 RC Writing for Electronic Media class (Hastride’s video is at the end of the article).

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction, S’18) is thrilled to announce that her short story “A Seed Planted” has been translated in Japanese for Night Land Quarterly Vol. 21 “The Fantasy of Sky Realms.” This short story was originally included in the anthology Hath No Fury, edited by Melanie R. Meadors. She also has a reprint of her flash piece “The Landscape of Lacrimation” included in the Weird Dream Society: An Anthology of the Possible & Unsubstantiated in Support of RAICES, edited by Julie C. Day. Both of these stories were originally drafted during her time at Stonecoast.

KT Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been long-listed for the Sunburst Award for her story “When the White Bird Sings,” published last year in Augur. In addition, the ephemera Reading Series is a finalist for the Aurora Award, under Best Fan Organizational.

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) will have a story, “The Keeper of the Marsh,” published in the July issue of The Scarlet Leaf Review.

Libby Cudmore (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) has sold her second story, “A Brief History of Local Warfare,” to Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine. Her first, “All Shook Down,” is scheduled for publication in the September/October issue of EQMM.

teri elam’s (Poetry, S’19) personal essay “On Asking Mama To Pray for Me” will be included in the forthcoming anthology, Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort During the Time of COVID-19 which is raising money for indie bookstores. Stonecoast professor Faith Adiele (Creative Nonfiction) is a contributor as well.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) new book of poems, Being Animal (published by Aldrich Press), is now available for purchase through kelsaybooks.com and Amazon. These poems observe and embody a vast array of animals from the honeybee to the mountain lion in poems that celebrate their beauty, grieve their loss, and reflect on their wisdom. For a signed copy, please visit www.terriglass.com. Derrick Jensen, author of A Language Older than Words and Endgame, says, “A love for wild nature suffuses this beautiful collection. Poetry can serve no more important purpose than to rekindle our love of those who are wild.”

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) has had poems published or accepted for publication in Main Street Rag, Clementine Unbound, Green Hills Lantern, and Arcturus. She has also launched a website with co-editor Pit Pinegar dedicated to providing writing exercises for those who need them. The exercises were contributed by writers who teach. Anyone who has published work and teaches and is interested in contributing an exercise can contact her at barbarapgreenbaum@gmail.com for more details.

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) is happy to announce that her memoir, She Said God Blessed Us: A Life Marked by Childhood Sexual Abuse in the Church, will be published by Exposit in August. Many people at Stonecoast helped in the writing of this book. Here’s what fellow alum Elliot Long (Creative Nonfiction, S’10), now with the Emmett Till Interpretive Center, has to say about the memoir: “In She Said God Blessed Us, Gail Hovey introduces us to a firebrand who confronts her world with a fierceness and determination to fight for change. As she participates in several of the pivotal social justice movements of our times, from the fight against American racism in the 1960s to the campaign to end South African apartheid in the decades that followed, Hovey grows to recognize how abuse of power also shaped her young life—abuse at the hands of her religious mentor. Wrenching and celebratory, Hovey’s memoir depicts a long struggle to move through guilt and pain toward a peace she can claim as her own.” For more information and to order an advance copy, please visit Gail’s website.

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has won the Neosho Arts Council’s short story contest for her story “December 1, 1969.” Judge Kevin Dilmore said, “A relatable protagonist and a suspenseful construction make this story a compelling read from the beginning. Backstory is introduced at a great pace just when readers will benefit the most from it. This is an enjoyable and thought-provoking read, and images from this will stay with readers for a long time.”

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created four new poetry videos. The videos for “Beacon” and “Into the Light,” inspired by the poems of the same names, go into Alan and his wife’s battle with lupus, Alan doing a kidney swap to help his wife, and their surgeries. “Heartbreak is Unavoidable” is inspired by Alan’s poem “This Good”; and “A Poem for My New Born and George Floyd” is inspired by Alan’s new poem “The Land of Innocence,” which he wrote for his one-month-old daughter and George Floyd. You can watch the videos here.

Nina B. Lichtenstein (Creative Nonfiction, S’20) is especially happy to have an essay, “Saying Goodbye to Seafood,” published in Tablet Magazine, where her writing has been rejected several times in the past. This reminded her to never give up and to submit, submit, submit.

Julia Munemo (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) and Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be hosted by World Fellowship Center for a virtual reading and conversation about Writing from a Family Legacy on Monday, July 6, 7:00-8:00 p,m. Julia will read from her debut memoir The Book Keeper and Ellen from her new novel Her Sister’s Tattoo. Details and link here.

An excerpt from Julia McKenzie Munemo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) memoir The Book Keeper appeared on Public Seminar in June.

dg nanouk okpik’s (Poetry, W’10) poem “If Oil Is Drilled in Bristol Bay” was featured in the Poetry Foundation’s Poem of the Day email on June 5, 2020.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) will have her poem “That Poetry Thing” in the Summer 2020 issue of Ibbetson Street Magazine.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “La Ride,” written in French, will appear with his English translation in the forthcoming anthology from Flying Ketchup Press. His poem “Dead Bodies and Declaratory Judgements” is forthcoming in Main Street Rag’s anthology Show Us Your Papers. And his poem  “My Grandfather’s Sky” will appear in North Scene Poetry Press’s anthology of poetry about 9/11.

The prose poem “Mountain” by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) will appear in the Fall/Winter issue of New South.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that as of today he is the Assistant Principal at Hinsdale Middle High School in Hinsdale, New Hampshire. In writing news, his essay “Hattery: The Many Roles of a First-Time Teacher” was accepted into Voices of Practice to be published later in 2020.

Kevin St. Jarre‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) has signed a new book deal for his novel Celestine with Encircle Publications. It’s expected to be in bookstores in May 2021.

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a short story titled “The Sea of Stars” in the new anthology Retellings of the Inland Seas from Candlemark and Gleam, edited by Athena Andreadis; and, an essay titled “Ghosts, Grimoires, and Dealing with Demons: Hellblazer’s Real-World Magic” in the new book From Bayou to Abyss: Examining John Constantine, Hellblazer from Sequart, edited by Lou Tambone and Rich Handley.

 

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Community News & Updates January 2015

Happy New Year!

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) had a lovely December. Her essay “A Question of Corvids,” winner of the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Creative Nonfiction Award, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for the Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology. Her novel The Money Bird (Midnight Ink, 2013) is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for Fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. And her poem “On Eating My Way Through a Feast of Poems” appeared in Minerva Rising, Issue 6: Food. That poem began as an “evaluation” of a class on using food in writing taught by Cait Johnson, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, and Aaron Hamburger at the summer 2012 residency—you never know where the seeds will be planted!

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) had two stories published by on-line journals in November: (1) “Honor Thy Wife” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and published in Crabfat Literary Magazine. (2) He was the featured fiction writer in Mud Season Review and the story, “Making Weight,” can be viewed here.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the December issue of the online magazine Luna Station Quarterly.

The Fragile World final front coverPaula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) second novel, The Fragile World, was published on October 28 by Harlequin MIRA. She was recently a guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss the book. Her first novel The Mourning Hours (June 2013) was a recent finalist for the Housatonic Book Award (info here). Paula would like to give continued thanks to Ted Deppe, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Boman Desai, who mentored her through early drafts of that book. A third novel is scheduled for publication in 2016. More information can be found on her website or on Facebook.

ZombifiedAdam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) book, Zombified, will be available from Kensington books in stores and online later this month. As a promotion for the book’s release, Kensington will also be offering the e-version of his first book, Zomburbia, for just $2.99 across all platforms.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two CNF pieces published last month: an untitled essay about a tree, an owl, and a growing boy in the “A Place in Mind” section of the Winter 2014 issue of Northern Woodlands and  “Four Days at Russell Pond,” an account of her family’s first backpacking trip, in issue 19 of TrailGroove. She also read an abridged version of her recently published essay, “Here Be Dragons,” at November’s Local Writers at the Local Buzz event in Cape Elizabeth, ME, alongside novelist Maria Padian and poet Christian Barter.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her book manuscript, Plumes: On Contamination of Home and Habitat, was selected by Karen Joy Fowler as the winner of the 2014 Siskiyou Prize in New Environmental Literature. The Siskiyou Prize, sponsored by Ashland Creek Press, honors literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife.  Winners receive a cash prize, an offer of publication from Ashland Creek Press, and a four-week residency at PLAYA near Summer Lake in the Oregon Outback. Plumes was Mary Heather’s Stonecoast thesis.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, has been acquired by Bedazzled Ink Publishing Company for their B Ink imprint and will be published in summer 2015. That’s two different books next year, for the 10th anniversary of her Stonecoast graduation!

In September, Passages North ran Alexis Paige’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) Stonecoast graduation speech, and later that month she joined Brevity Magazine as assistant editor.

Catherine Schmitt‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) essay “The Coyote Gangs of Hope” is in the current issue of 1966: A Journal of Creative Nonfiction. This piece was improved with the help of Rick Bass and participants in the Summer 2011 nonfiction workshop.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) is the head of programming for Boskone 52, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, which takes place in Boston from February 13-15, 2015. There will be a panel titled “Writers on Writing: Talking Plot with Stonecoast MFA Faculty,” featuring faculty members David Anthony Durham, Theodora Goss, Elizabeth Hand, and James Patrick Kelly—moderated by alumna Allison Hartman Adams. Stonecoast faculty and alumni will also be participating in a variety of other panels, readings, and discussions. Boskone is free to the public on Friday the 13th from 2:00-6:00 p.m., and attending memberships are required after 6:00 p.m. on Friday as well as for the duration of the convention. More information about the convention, programming, and weekend/one-day memberships can be found at www.boskone.org

boskone-52-image

CWIsTypingChristopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) new column, “The Bottle & the Pen: An Exploration through Wine and Literature,” debuted on GrapeCollective on December 26, 2014. You can find the column here.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) book Letters from Limbo has been accepted for publication by CavanKerry Press.

Stonecoasters who wish to meet or reconnect with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will be interested in two Western Massachusetts appearances next month at Bay Path University, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. Ted and Annie will give a reading open to the public free of charge Thursday, February 12, at 7:00 p.m. at Bay Path University. On Saturday, February 14, at Bay Path’s Writers’ Day, Ted Deppe will give a talk on Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous. He will be joined by speakers Charles Coe, on Writing About Those Close to You: The Joys and the Terrors; Bruce DeSilva, on Writing Crime; Penny Guisinger, on Grant Writing; Nell Lake, on How I Went Deep: Writing Intimate Stories About Other People; and Roland Merullo, on The Demons of the Blank Page. For information on registration and fees for Writers’ Day, please write Briana Sitler, at bsiter@baypath.edu

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has completed his long-delayed historical novel about the Spartacus slave rebellion. It’s off to his publisher, Doubleday, for publication sometime in 2016. Also, Redwave Films has renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story for the twelfth year. The producer, Uberto Pasolini, and director, Alan Taylor, seem more confident than ever that this is the year they’ll be able to move the project forward.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has been been named the new vice president of the Horror Writers Association following the death of president Rocky Wood. She has also been invited to the annual Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock Holmes birthday dinner in New York City, which takes place during the first half of the Stonecoast winter residency. She will be signing In the Company of Sherlock Holmes with her NYT bestselling, Edgar-Award-winning editors Leslie Klinger and Laurie King, as well as Pulitzer-Prize winner Michael Dirda. She is also a Juror for the Shirley Jackson Awards and encourages published horror writers to consider asking their publishers to submit their work. Details are on the website.

James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Someday” which originally appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction in April, 2014, has been selected for inclusion in two Best of the Year anthologies: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year Volume 9, edited by Jonathan Strahan from Solaris Books, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction 32, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press.

dezart flyerMichael Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover will run January 30 through February 8 in Palm Springs, CA. On January 22, Mike’s Actual Glass will be performed by The Boiling Point Players, in Houston, TX. Mike did the sound design for The Diary of Anne Frank, running January 9-18 (dates sound familiar?) at The Actors’ Studio of Newburyport, Newburyport, MA.

In 2014, Eléna Rivera‘s (Poetry, Translation) poetry appeared in two new chapbooks: Atmosphered published by Oystercatcher Press, U.K., and Overture published by Metambesen Books. Her poems were also published in the following print and on-line journals: Aethetica Magazine, Creative Writing Annual 2015 Edition, London, UK; Aufgabe 13, Litmus Press; Upstart: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies: Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed; Jacket2, John Taggart feature; The Volta, Trash issue. She has a new book of translation, Parting Movement, Constantly Prevented by Isabelle Baladine Howald, published by Oystercatcher Press, Norfolk, U.K., 2014. She also gave a reading in Paris, France, as part of Thomas Hirschhorn’s art installation, Flamme éternelle, at the Palais de Tokyo.

81---ImageElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to report that her newest novel, We Got Him, will be published in 2016 by New Rivers Press. NRP is currently celebrating its 40th year in publishing and published Elizabeth’s most recent novel, Girl Held In Home.  Excerpts from We Got Him have appeared as stories in Epoch (story cited in Best American Short Stories), Words & Images, and Michigan Quarterly Review (the story was winner of the Lawrence Foundation Prize).  Details and dates for the novel TBA; visit:www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has been named to the board of directors of PEN New England, where she joins fellow boardmember and Stonecoast grad Anthony D’AriesPEN is a worldwide association of writers and all who celebrate literature and defend free expression. PEN New England is a branch of PEN American Center and part of International PEN, the world’s oldest international literary and human rights organization. PEN is headquartered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14): The Literary Reflections department of Literary Mama has recently opened submissions for essays that explore the world of literature—reading, writing, working as a writer—from a mother’s perspective. We seek unique approaches and deep reflection on words and motherhood. Please see our submission guidelines and our archives of past essays. Literary Mama is also hiring several editors and assistant editors. This is a wonderful opportunity to be immersed in the production of a high-quality online literary journal among a team of dynamic and caring literary mamas.

From Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, current):  Call for submissions! Amanda Pleau has been judging a flash fiction competition at MASH Stories. The difference between MASH and most other competitions: no entry fee and they will provide notification of acceptance along with critical feedback and encouragement in almost no time at all. Details at mashstories.com.

 

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