Tag Archives: Erin Roberts

Community News & Updates January 2018

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) essay “Biophilia at my Bedside” was just published in the anthology Nature, Love, Medicine. The anthology, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Torrey House Press, includes essays by twenty-three writers including Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jane Hirschfield, and thich Nhat Hanh.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited her story “The Scarlet Cloak” was reprinted in Like A Woman, a domestic violence benefit anthology. Her short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” was published in December’s issue of Gamut Magazine—classmates will recognize this story as inspired by her thesis novel-in-progess The Sleeping Boy. This just in: Factor Four Magazine will be publishing Karen’s science fiction short story “To Infinity and Beyond” in their inaugural issue. With this sale, Karen’s happy to announce she is applying to SFWA. She’s serving as a guest editor for Pseudopod Podcast for March 2018 and hope you all tune in to listen to the five awesome stories she selected (with the associate editing help of fellow ‘coasters Shawna Borman, Erin Roberts, and Cecelia Dockins). Her poem “Fire Lover” will appear in February’s Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, with an accompanying narration. Karen also has been narrating stories by others. Karen has created a recording of Penelope Evans’ “Wasps Make Honey” for a forthcoming episode of Escape Pod and Evan Dicken’s “The Taking Tree” for Pseudopod.

Illustration for Karen’s story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow”

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) puts her memories of being a bookseller to use in a flash fiction story for the anthology Welcome to Dystopia edited by Gordon Van Gelder from OR Books. (Shh, most of the story I didn’t have to make up!)

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Re-stitched” can be found in the January edition of Split Lip magazine. “Re-stitched” is about two sisters, Alicia and Stephanie, their family dysfunction, and the impurity of human flesh. It’s about as creepy as you’d expect…

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) Terri’s poem, “Violet Green Swallows” was published in Young Raven’s Review, Issue 6. Her poem “Cow Tipping Tuesday” will be published in the 2018 San Diego Poetry Annual and her haiku in the Spring Issue of The Fourth River.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry, W’08) received the 2017 Oregon Book Award for Drama for her play Words That Burn. The play dramatizes the WWII experiences of conscientious-objector William Stafford, Japanese-American internee Lawson Inada, and Chicano Marine Guy Gabaldón in their own words. The play premiered at Milagro Theatre in Portland, Oregon, in September of 2014 in commemoration of the William Stafford Centennial, Hispanic Heritage Month, and the 70th anniversary of the rescindment of Executive Order 9066 (incarcerating Japanese-Americans). Words That Burn was also produced in 2017 at the Merc Playhouse in Twisp, Washington, and the Linkville Playhouse in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Alan King’s (Poetry, W’13) Point Blank was reviewed in The Washington City Paper, Auburn Avenue, and Run Tell That Magazine.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) third collection of short fiction tinged with crime and the supernatural, Acres of Perhaps, will be appearing in April 2018. It is available now for preorder from Lethe Press if you would like to support the small press.

Carolyn O’Doherty‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) debut novel, Rewind, will be released April 10, 2018. The novel, published by Boyds Mills Press, tells the story of a group of teenagers with the ability to freeze time. The sequel will be published in Spring 2019.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’12) recently attended Continuum Music’s Urgent Voices multimedia performance in Toronto, featuring the debut of From the Diaries of William Lyon Mackenzie King, an operatic work for which she write the libretto. The Birmingham-based composer, Scott Wilson, was also in attendance. The Canada Council for the Arts has provided Oliver, Wilson, and Continuum director Ryan Scott with funding to develop the project.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) play Radio Silent has won the 2017 Meeting House Theatre Arts Lab’s annual new play contest and will receive a staged reading on January 20 at Schoodic Arts for All in Winterport, Maine. Pratt also won the award last year for his play The King of France. Several of his plays are among those being considered for full production next spring.

In addition to winning one of the South Carolina State Poetry Society contests, Steve Rhodes’s (Poetry, W’11) poem “Inheritance” won First Prize in Still: The Journal’s annual poetry contest.  He and his wife, Ann, moved to Charleston, South Carolina, three years ago. Steve recently completed his third poetry collection, What You Don’t See, and is looking for a publisher. He is currently working on a prose and poetry memoir. This past summer and fall he was invited to give poetry readings as part of hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park led by the singer/song-writer Doug Peters. Great fun.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) poem “Thirteen Ways of Killing the Captain’s Son” was published in Selkie Zine, issue 5. You can find it here.

Kathleen Saville (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has been invited as a speaker to the Match 2018 Virginia Festival of the Book to share her memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey, published by Skyhorse/Arcade Publishing in February 2017. Information on how to attend the Festival is here.

Olive L. Sullivan‘s (Fiction/Poetry, S’15) poetry collection Wandering Bone is now available on Amazon or directly from the publisher, Meadowlark Books. Several of the poems in this book were written as part of her second semester project with Jeanne Marie Beaumount.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) has three poems—“Memory of Museum of Memory,” “How to Remember,” and “The Morning After”—in the current issue of Blackbird. Her poem “Death Spends Halloween at the Country Bar” was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Escape into Life, where her work was featured in July. And her short story “High Side” appeared in Five on the Fifth earlier this year; this was her first fiction publication.

Marco Wilkinson’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay, “Hidden Light, Wooden Ladder, Bucket of Clay, Pillar of Water,” will appear in issue four of the Bennington Review. His nonfiction manuscript, Madder, was the first runner-up in the 2017 Red Hen Press Non-Fiction Prize, judged by Mark Doty.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) was published in Vol. VI of The New Guard. “Dearest Mum” is part of The Dream Letters, an ongoing feature of the journal. Wilson’s fictional letter is excerpted from a novel-in-progress based on her great-grandmother, an orphan train.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction), publishing under S.M. Mack, won first place for the Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult Writing for her short story “The Carrying Beam.” The story was published online in Hunger Mountain, The VCFA Journal for the Arts, and is available here.

Illustration for Sarah’s story “The Carrying Beam”

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story with Redwave Films, as well as the film/TV option for Pride of Carthage with Sonar Entertainment. His short story “All the Girls Love Michael Stein” will be republished in The Stonecoast Review and was recently published in translation in the Polish SFF magazine Nowa Fantastyka. He’s also signed on as one of the judges for the 2018 World Fantasy Awards. Details here via Locus.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel We Got Him (New Rivers Press) is forthcoming as an AudioBook in 2018, recorded by Stonecoast alum Tanya Eby and her Blunder Woman Productions. Both Elizabeth’s opera and her rock opera about Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan will be produced in early 2018, at the time of the Winter Olympics. In January, the operetta group Mixed Precipitation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will present Tonya and Nancy: The Opera—a one-act opera with libretto by Elizabeth and music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross—on Lake Harriet for the Art Shanties. Meanwhile, in New York City at 54Below on February 13th, Broadway stars sing a concert version of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, a show which will be recorded as a CD from Broadway Records and which has recently received coverage from Playbill and Broadway World (you can read the Broadway World article here). For updates, see: www.elizabethsearle.net

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates December 2017

ALUMS

Jen Hodsdon (Fiction, W’08) edited and published the first issue of the zine That’s What She Said: News from Florence House. Florence House is a Portland, ME, homeless shelter for women operated by Preble Street. TWSS publishes writing and art created by guests of the shelter. Issue 2 is forthcoming in early 2018.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) has written an essay on memory and childhood experience with racist remarks at The Nervous Breakdown, “Unspoken Words that Begin with N (even when they don’t)”.

Lisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry, S’04) short story “Salt and Blue” will be published in the March issue of Tahoma Literary Review. Lisa received an AAUP Faculty Development Award for her project “Turbulence and Tenor: Hybrid Forms and Diverse Voices.” This project will take her to Ireland for the month of July to launch a book, offer a class, and host a writing retreat. For information about the retreat, contact Lisa at lisactaylor22@gmail.com

CURRENT STUDENTS

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction) was recently awarded the 2017 Diverse Writers Grant and the 2017 Diverse Worlds Grant from the Speculative Literature Foundation. The Diverse Writers Grant supports new and emerging writers from underrepresented groups, while the Diverse Worlds grant is intended for work that best presents a diverse world, regardless of the writer’s background.

FACULTY

The Spanish edition of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel The Risen has just been published by B DE BOOKS. It’s called La Rebelión. (And Spartacus is now called Espartaco…)

T Clutch Fleischmann‘s (Creative Nonfiction) book-length essay Time Is the Thing a Body Moves Through will be published by Coffee House Press in Spring 2019.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) short story “Refugees” has been accepted by The Bennington Review for publication next year. Also watch out for his creative non-fiction personal essay “Sweetness Matters” in Tin House Magazine, due out winter 2018.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) contributed an essay to the rotating Another Word guest column in the November issue of online magazine Clarkesworld. It’s called “Listen Up!” and discusses his lifelong love affair with audiobooks. His short novel The Wreck of the Godspeed has been reprinted as an ebook in Italy by Delos Digital.

A New York City concert of Broadway stars singing songs from Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will be produced at 54Below at 254 54th St. on February 13, 2018, during the Winter Olympics. The show stars Ashley Spencer as “Tonya” and Lauren Worsham as “Nancy” (Lauren is a Tony nominee and Drama Desk Award winner for A Gentleman’s Guide and Ashley starred in Broadway’s Grease, Hairspray, Priscilla Queen of Night, as well as on TV and film). This concert will be recorded and released n the 54Below Concert CD series of Broadway Records. Join Elizabeth at ‘rink-side’ at 54Below (formerly Studio 54). For updates, see: www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

Ashley Spencer as “Tonya” and Lauren Worsham as “Nancy”

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Community News & Updates July 2017

THE STONECOAST REUNION


The Stonecoast Reunion is coming up fast, and we’re excited to welcome you to Brunswick, Maine, July 14th-17th!  The weekend will be an exciting time for readings, seminars, and networking with fellow graduates of the program. If you have not done so, please register now! Please visit: http://usm.maine.edu/stonecoastmfa/stonecoast-alumni-0.

If you are not able to attend the reunion’s day events, we’re still delighted to invite you to the evening events, including the alumni reunion reading, welcome reception, and book fair on Friday, July 14th! A professional photographer will be present at the reading and reception, and we’re planning for a group photo. We’d love to have as many alumni as possible participate!

We ask that if you are not registering for the reunion but wish to attend the evening alumni reading and reception (July 14th) or the graduation and dance party (July 15th) that you RSVP here. Family and friends are also welcome, and donations will be accepted at the door for attendees not registered for the reunion.

ALUMS


Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) was pleased to learn his novel The Time Train won the Maine Literary Award in the speculative fiction category.

Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) poem “Pseudopod” will be reprinted in The Were-Traveler’s Mythos Planet Issue.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has reprinted her story “The Executioner” in the special issue People of Color Take over Fantastic Stories of the Imagination Magazine. She also has published a story in FIYAH Magazine called “The Breeze in the Boughs,” which is a fabulist short story about life in gentrifying Brooklyn as well as a bit of a parody of Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willow.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “The Rocket Farmer” can be found in Interzone 271—the magazine’s July/August edition. “The Rocket Farmer” concerns itself with a family of rocket farmers and the ugliness that arises out of their crop’s many failed launches. It’s also about a fourteen-year-old girl who is sick of her mom.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was pleased that her essay “The World in their Hands” was published in issue 3.2 of The Maine Review. She also had a short piece on mountain lingo appear in TrailGroove and an interview with Rad Dad founder, Tomas Moniz, in Literary Mama.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) flash piece “Inroads Up Hills” is featured online for Broke-Ass Stuart‘s new fiction series. Incidentally, John workshopped this piece at Stonecoast in Sarah Braunstein‘s Flash Fiction workshop.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has been away on an Amtrak Writer’s Residency from June 22 through July 2. Her trip took her to Chicago, New Orleans, and New York City for research, writing, and revision on her next novel. She is more than grateful to Amtrak for this opportunity for work and adventure.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “Barachois,” is included in the just-released 3 nations Anthology: Native, Canadian, and New England Writers from Resolute Bear Press in both its original French and in an English translation by the author. Barachois is an Acadian word many believe come from the M’iq M’ac language and might best be translated as a delta or the sand bars in the mouth of a tidal tributary. The anthology is available as an electronic publication and a print journal.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction W14) has been busier than expected. After returning from the Stonecoast in Ireland Residency in Howth in January, he began a career change. He’s happy to announce that he’s left social work behind and accepted a position teaching high school English in New Hampshire. June saw the publication of his flash piece “Spindle Talk” at The Future Fire (Cinderella meets Mean Girls meets Narcan). His essay “I Would Fly with Dragons” was released in Invisible 3, and his short story “Tide Child” is forthcoming from On Spec.

During June, Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) moderated the panel “Nurturing the Writer in Your Child or Teenager” at the Maplewood-South Orange (NJ) Book Festival and was on the panel “Nothing But the Truth: A Women’s Perspective on Writing the Memoir” at BooksNJ (Paramus, NJ).

An Elder Man, the new short film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W’07), premieres July 2 at the Walla Walla Movie Crush in Washington State. Further festival screenings will follow later this year.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has an essay, “It Could Happen to You,” in the 2017 issue of City Works Literary Journal. City Works is a publication of San Diego City College.

FACULTY


On Sunday, July 30, 2017, Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be reading in the East Hampton Poetry Marathon Reading at the Marine Museum, Bluff Road, Amagansett, NY. The event starts at 5:00 pm.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) essay on writers in translation, why some make it and others don’t, is in the current issue of Tin House. Read it here. Also, Aaron is thrilled to be participating in TWO readings in support of the anthology Soap Opera Confidential, edited by our very own Stonecoast rock star faculty Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea. The first will be on July 9th at 1:00 p.m. at Politics & Prose Bookstore in DC, along with contributors Kyoko Mori and Shara McCollum. The second will be in Portland, Maine, during the break at the Stonecoast residency, Wednesday, July 12th, at the USM Glickman library on the seventh floor in the University Events Room at 6:00 p.m. Free and open to the public. Come hear Aaron confess about his obsession with Dynasty II: The Colbys, as well as his struggles to learn ballroom dancing…. Finally, Aaron will be teaching a class on food writing at Politics & Prose Bookstore in DC this month, July 18th and 25th. Details are here.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) neo-noir novel Available Dark has been optioned for television as a joint venture between producer Mike Ryan’s Greyshack Films and Votiv Film. She was profiled by The Portland Press Herald for her work on a National Forest Service study on the future of fire management, and for Fire, her new book of fiction and essays (mostly) related to climate change. Hand was a recent guest on The Writer’s Cast and the Eating the Fantastic podcasts. Her recent novel Wylding Hall has just been released in Spain, with foreign rights sold in Russia, and she was named one of the Six Literary Horror Writers You Should Read in an article on Tor.com. Recent reviews include Jeff Vandermeer’s Borne for The Los Angeles Times, and Literary Wonderlands, edited by Laura MillerPeter Beagle’s Summerlong, and Graeme Macrae Burnet’s His Bloody Project: Documents Relating to the Case of Roderick Macrae, all for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will be reading and signing “Look Homeward, Vampire,” her essay on Dark Shadows, with the Soap Opera Confidential crew at 5:00 p.m. on July 12th at Glickman Library in Portland, Maine. She’ll appear at San Diego Comic-Con, working in the Kymera Press booth, #2003, during exhibitor hall hours on Thursday and Friday. This is her additional schedule:

  • Signing a special limited edition issue of her new comic book, Mary Shelley Presents, Thursday, July 20th, from 12:30–2:30 p.m. and Friday, July 2nd, from 3:30–5:30 p.m.
  • Signing at Mysterious Galaxy booth, #1119, on Thursday, July 20th at 5:00 p.m.
  • Panel with other members of the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers Friday, July 21st, 2:00-3:00 p.m., Room 32AB

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and her show Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera were featured in The New York Times article “Tonya Harding: a Tragic Muse?” published on June 13 with a photo from the NYC NYMF production of Tonya & Nancy in the NYT print edition and a reel from the Boston production of the show online at nytimes.com. Elizabeth is writing the book for a new rock opera—Skypaint: A Cyber Rock Opera—with music and lyrics by guitarist Russell Chudnofsky who has toured with Frank Black, Trisha Yearwood, Faith Hill, and more. The show will be performed in October, details TBA; check out the website here.

Stonecoasters and Soap-lovers, join Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) and Elizabeth Searle and All-Star readers Aaron Hamburger, Nancy Holder, Allan Hunter, and Erin Roberts as they read from Soap Opera Confidential (on sale via our own Kelly!) at Glickman Library USM in Portland 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 12th. D.C. soap opera fans: Hear Soap Opera Confidential contributors Aaron Hamburger, Shara McCallum (former Stonecoast faculty member), and Kyoko Mori read from their soapy essays July 9th, 1:00 pm at Politics and Prose. Suzanne discussed Soap Opera Confidential on a radio interview on Pine Valley Radio. The June 28th issue of the national magazine Soaps In Depth features Soap Opera Confidential with a special “giveaway” offer—the issue will available at supermarket or drugstore near you!

 

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Community News & Updates June 2017

UPCOMING READINGS

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11), founding director, Poetry Barn, is pleased to announce a reading of Stonecoast faculty and alumni Jeanne Marie Beaumont, Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Cait Johnson, and Elizabeth Searle, on August 18th at the Woodstock Public Library, Woodstock, NY.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14), co-editor of the Literary Reflections department at Literary Mama, seeks essays by mother writers, both established and emerging, about the intersection of motherhood and literature. We’re looking for first-person reflections with an intellectual as well as personal focus. Potential topics include: how motherhood influences the creative process and vice versa; a close reading of a piece of literature through the motherhood lens; how reading with children builds connections; how literature can provide answers or solace during difficult times. Please see our submissions page for complete guidelines, as well as our recent “Tips from the Editors” blog post, which rounds up several of our favorite essays.

ALUMS

AJ Bauers’ (Popular Fiction, W’17) flash-fiction story “The Wrong One” can be found in the most recent issue of Chantwood Magazine. “The Wrong One” examines the grief of a self-editing protagonist as she walks her path toward closure. For AJ’s more lighthearted fiction, check out her weekly webcomic.

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) was thrilled to publish his short story “A Unified Drone Theory” in the summer issue of The Indiana Review.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) had a fabulous time at the ConQuesT 48 Science Fiction Convention in Kansas City presenting on “Dark Fantasy vs. Horror,” “From Fan to Pro: Writing as a Career,” “Horror Fiction and Xenophobia,” “Where Do We Go from Here: Current Developments in Writing Speculative Fiction,” and “Why Write Short Stories” over Memorial Day Weekend. Her flash “Like a Soul” will be reprinted this month in Darkhouse Books’ Descansos anthology. Stonecoasters have supported her throughout the hardest challenges of her life and she is forever grateful! Viva Stonecoast!

Michael L. Joy (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been named the Co-Chair of SleuthFest, the annual educational mystery writers’ conference put on by the Florida chapter of the MWA.

Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her book-length braided essay, Glass Needles & Goose Quills: Elementary Lessons in Atomic Properties, Nuclear Families, and Radical Poetics, is now available for pre-order. Also, Lissa, as founding director of Poetry Barn, is pleased to announce Poetry Barn’s 2017 programming celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) was thrilled that her humorous and hot short story, “Toy Story,” about a mom who finds herself in a sex-toy shop, found a home in the anthology If Mom’s Happy: Stories of Erotic Mothers, which was released by Cwtch Press on May 1.

Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) is thrilled to report the feature-film script he co-wrote, Being, is now in pre-production. Directed by Doug C. Williams, it stars Lance Henriksen (Aliens, Near Dark, Millennium) and Robert John Burke (Stephen King’s Thinner, Law & Order: SVU), with more casting announcements forthcoming. The practical effects-heavy, science-fiction movie is slated to begin principal photography in mid-August.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to share that her essay “Things Seen in the Dark: A Triptych” will appear in the June 2017 issue of Hippocampus Magazine. Special thanks to Suzanne Strempek Shea, Melanie Brooks, and Penny Guisinger for their moral support with this publication.

Shannon Ratliff‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’16) essay “The Collected Cathedrals of Mary Magdalene” appears in the Spring 2017 issue of Seneca Review, currently out. Her essay “The Man on the Moon” will appear in the new issue of Gulf Coast this month.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S ’08) announces with great pleasure that the University of Nevada Press will publish her memoir, tentatively titled Every Loss Story is a Love Story: The Father Daughter Reunion, in June 2018.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) was a finalist for the 2017 Iowa Review Awards. Her article on land-locked salmon and Arctic char, two native Maine fishes, is in Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Magazine. Catherine has also been elected to a second term as a member of the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance Board of Directors. Later this month she will be attending the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents as part of a project with Mount Desert Island Historical Society.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) first published short story, “They Come In Through the Walls,” got its first audio version at Tales to Terrify. Her story “Secret Keeper,” a Phantom of the Opera retelling set in a high-school theater where the phantom is an outcast teenage girl, will be out from Nightmare in early June.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ‘04) has her first piece of nonfiction up on Gravel Literary Magazine’s web site. A short story, “Second Lives,” is forthcoming in Quail Bell.

Ashley Warren‘s (Fiction, S’12) poems “Alice and the Snake”, “Neighborhood”, and “To Those Who Meet Me After” appear in the current issue of Typehouse Literary Magazine.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Graduating student Brenda Cooper‘s (Fiction) next novel, Wilders, will be released by Prometheus Books on June 13th, 2017. Ramez Naam, award-winning author of the Nexus series, call it “A vivid picture of a world rebuilding from the edge of ecological ruin and the seeming conflicts between civilization and the nature it depends on.”

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be reading along with National Book Award Finalist/Bestseller Jayne Anne Phillips at Earfull, presented by the Mosesian Center for the Arts in Watertown, MA, on Tuesday, June 6th. The readings will be accompanied by the music of Jen Trynin and Aaron Perrino. If you’re near Boston please consider coming out! Tickets available here.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has been combining writing with activism this month. His piece “My Grandmother, the Undocumented Immigrant” appeared in Tablet Magazine. Also, he recently taught a sold-out course called “Writing as an Act of Resistance” at Politics & Prose Bookstore. The class was so successful that it’s going to be offered again this fall. Details will be posted on the store website.

Wonder Woman: The Official Movie Novelization, written by Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction), comes out on June 6th, to coincide with the worldwide release of the film starring Gal Gadot.

Stonecoast alumna Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) will be among the featured authors at Bay Path University’s annual Booklovers event, June 4th, 2:00-4:00 p.m., in the dining commons at 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. The author of Not a Place on Any Map, Alexis will be joined by Kate Clifford Larson (Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter), Ed Orzechowski (You’ll Like it Here), and Sophfronia Scott (A Child of Faith: Raising a Spiritual Being in a Secular World). Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), Bay Path’s writer-in-residence and director of writing programs, will welcome the audience. The event is open to the public free of charge, and both book clubs and individual readers are welcome. Books will be sold and refreshments will be served.

A few winters back, faculty members Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea met in Elizabeth’s Harraseeket Inn room during lunch at January residency to press “send” on their proposal for a collection of essays on soap operas by writers and poets who have some fixation with the classic television and radio form of storytelling. The result, Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow as the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives, was launched April 30th at Newtonville Books in Newton Center, MA. The co-editors and seven of their 33 contributors enjoyed a standing-room-only crowd at the bookstore owned by Stonecoast alumna Mary Cotton and her husband, author Jamie Clarke. Among the readers was Stonecoast alumna Brenda Sparks Prescott, who read from her essay “The Doctors and William Beaumont General Hospi-tale.” Other Stonecoast connections among the 35 contributors: student Erin Roberts; alums Marie Hannan-Mandel, Tigh Rickman, and Susan Lilley; faculty members Ted Deppe, Aaron Hamburger, and Nancy Holder; former faculty members Jamie Cat Callan, Ann Hood, Lesléa Newman, and Shara McCallum; and Nuala Ni Chonchuir, who’s read and lectured at Stonecoast Ireland. The book is dedicated to the late Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo, an award-winning fiction writer who was a member of Stonecoast’s inaugural graduating class and who was to have contributed an essay on how soap operas helped her learn the culture of Japan when she moved there for what turned out to be ten years of work in radio and television broadcasting. Elizabeth and Suzanne send many thanks to Stonecoast students including Shellie Leger, who made the trip to help celebrate the book. Suzanne and Elizabeth continue to celebrate—most recently over the fact that, at a grocery or pharmacy checkout very near you, from coast to coast, readers can find CBS Soaps in Depth magazine and its two-page spread on Soap Opera Confidential. The May 29th issue dedicated two pages to the story “Fan Nonfiction: Soap Opera Confidential Examines Why We Always Have—and Always Will—Tune in Tomorrow.” The piece included photos of The Bold and the Beautiful star Thorsten Kaye, who contributed a poem to Soap Opera Confidential and is shown holding a book. Is it Soap Opera Confidential? Tune in tomorrow to find out… Soap Opera Confidential also is featured in a story by G. Michael Dobbs of The Reminder in East Longmeadow, MA. Join Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne as they celebrate Soap Opera Confidential June 7th, 7:00 p.m. at Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main St., Northampton, MA. The night will feature readings by contributors Lesléa Newman, Tommy Shea, and Sebastian Stuart.

Alumna Brenda Sparks Prescott reads from her essay “The Doctors and William Beaumont General Hospi-tale” at the April 30th launch of Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow as the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives at Newtonville Books.

Elizabeth Searle with Newtonville Books owner and Stonecoast alumna Mary Cotton.

Soap Opera Confidential featured in the national magazine Soap Opera Insider.

Yes, at a shop counter near you: Soap Opera Insider and its two-page feature on Soap Opera Confidential.

Contributors and co-editors at Newtonville Books’ launch of Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow as the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives: (from left) alumna Brenda Sparks Prescott, Sebastian Stuart, Emily Franklin, Elizabeth Searle, Allan Hunter, Lisa Borders, Marianne Leone, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Leigh Montville.

Soap Opera Confidential co-editors Suzanne Strempek Shea and Elizabeth Searle at the Newtonville Books launch.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates February 2017

ALUMS

swift-for-the-sunKaren Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) thrilled to announce her first novel, an LGBT romantic pirate adventure set in 1822 Caribbean, Swift for the Sun, now has a cover (by the amazing Anna Sikorska) and a release date: March 27, 2017, from Dreamspinner Press. Karen’s also sold a 300-word prose poem featuring marooned interstellar spies called “Save Our Souls” to Silver Blade Magazine for their February issue and created an audio recording of the poem as a companion piece. She’s excited to announce that her zombies vs robots 1500-word story “We Are Still Feeling” earned a Finalist for 4th Quarter 2016 in L Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future contest. Her 15,000-word Dickensien fairytale novella, “The Beaded Slipper,” will appear in Crimson Edge Press’s Maidens and Magic maidens-magicanthology, February 14, 2017; she’s thrilled that her character Sasha is on the cover (the blonde woman holding the red slipper). Karen is also chuffed her unrequited astronaut love poem “The Blind Elephants of Io” (which you can hear read by British actress Patsy Prince) has been nominated for a Rhysling award by members of the Science Fiction Poetry Association. Two other flash stories “Samuel Alexander’s Storm Angel” (Roane Publishing’s Flash Fiction Fridays) and a reprint “Like a Soul” (Creepy Campfire Quarterly: Science Fiction Issue) will be published in February. STONECOAST REPRESENT!

Two new stories by Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) are out this month. “Everyone Gets a Happy Ending” concerns itself with female friendships, national fertility, and the desert Southwest; it’s available in the January/February issue of Interzone. Julie’s second story, “One Thousand Paper Cranes,” melds ideas about the neurobiology of memory, restricted-environmental-stimulation therapy, and part selves; you can find it online in the Winter 2017 issue of Kaleidotrope. On the podcasting front, both episode 135 of Far-Fetched Fables and episode 433 of Podcastle are now available. The first podcast features Julie’s narration of Sharon Shinn’s “The Double-Edged Sword.” The second contains Julie’s reading of Sandra O’Dell’s fabulous and fabulously funny “Telling Stories.” You can also find Julie—live and in person!—on various panels at Boskone 54, February 17-19 at the Westin Waterfront Hotel in Boston, MA. Stop by and checkout her reading on Saturday, February 18th, at 1:30 p.m. in the Independence room.

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Alan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book Point Blank was named among the “Best New Poetry of the New Year 2017” by the Washington Independent Review of Books! Learn more here.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) is writing for Obsidian Entertainment’s upcoming game—Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire—which has recently launched a crowdfunding campaign through Fig. You can learn more about the game and the campaign here. Fig is similar to Kickstarter in many respects, but also incorporates opportunities for financial investment in the game’s success. (Whether you’re a backer, an investor, or just an enthusiastic gamer with a taste for isometric D&D-esque PC games, I can’t recommend Deadfire enough. This is going to be a fun ride, and thanks for reading this deep into my ramblings. ~PK)

pillars2

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be on a panel at AWP titled “Second Blooming: Women Authors Debuting after Fifty” on Friday, February 10, 10:30 a.m. She will also be reading from her third novel, Kinship of Clover, at Politics and Prose Bookstore on Friday, February 10, at 6:00 p.m.

red-hen-press

rowing-for-my-lifeBruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) short-story collection The Trash Detail has been selected for publication by New Rivers Press. His full-length play The King of France, which won the Meetinghouse Theatre Lab’s annual new play contest, received a staged reading on January 21 in Winter Harbor Main.

Kathleen Saville‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey has recently been published by Arcade Publishing, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing; read about it here. She teaches creative writing at the American University in Cairo, Egypt.

incendiary-artPatricia Smith‘s (Poetry, S’08) 8th book of poetry, Incendiary Art, will be released on February 17 from Northwestern University Press. Her last two books were Gotta Go, Gotta Flow (City Files Press, 2015), a collaboration with award-winning Chicago photographer Michael Abramson, and Shoulda Been Jimi Savannah, winner of the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize for the best U.S. poetry book of 2012. Patricia has also been chosen as a 2018 Civitella Rainieri fellow—this summer, she will be in residence for six weeks in a 15th-century castle in rural Umbria, Italy.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Maneaters” appears in the January issue of Black Static. This was the first story Bonnie brought to Stonecoast workshop.

FACULTY

On Friday, February 3, 2017, Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be visiting Syracuse to read in the Visiting Author Reading Series at the Downtown Writers Center at the YMCA, 340 Montgomery St., Syracuse, NY. The reading starts at 7:00 p.m. and is free. Later in the month, Jeanne Marie will be traveling to the AWP Conference in Washington, DC. If you are there, please stop by the CavanKerry Press Bookfair booth #330 on Friday, February 10th from 11:00-11:30 a.m., where she will be signing copies of Letters from Limbo.

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) is going to be the Genre Fiction Keynote speaker at this year’s Writing the Rockies Conference at Western Colorado University. He’ll be flying out there right after the Stonecoast summer residency to deliver an address he’s calling “The Virtues of the Multi-Genre Toolbox.”

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) flash fiction “The House Husband” was a runner-up for DC’s City Paper‘s fiction issue. It’s his first foray into Washington, DC-themed fiction, and given the current political situation, he’s expecting to write quite a bit more!

fireFire, a collection of interviews, essays, and short fiction by Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction), has just been published by PM Press. In January, she was the subject of a profile at Literary Hub by Adrian Van Young, and her 2014 Salon essay on the Affordable Care Act was picked up by the Dept. of Health and Human Services as part of the effort to encourage people to enroll in the ACA. Recent reviews include Simon Reynolds’ Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy and Al Ridenour’s Krampus and the Old, Dark Christmas for The Los Angeles Times, and Anne Rice’s Prince Lestat and the Realms of Atlantis for The Washington Post.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) hopes to see fellow Stonecoasters at AWP February 8-11 in DC! She has had two events accepted at AWP 2017: she will read in the event “Written on a (Woman’s) Body: A Cross Genre Reading of Bold Writings about Women and Their Bodies”—which also features Dolen Perkins-Valdez—and Elizabeth will moderate “Adaptation in Three Acts: Adventures in Adapting Material for Scripts” (featuring Suzanne Strempek Shea as well as Danny Eaton and David Shields). Elizabeth will also give a brief reading at a New Rivers Press/Fairfield University party at Mandu restaurant February 9th at 6:00 p.m. Back home in Boston, on March 3rd at 7:00 p.m., Elizabeth will read from her novel We Got Him at the Dire Reading Series in Cambridge, MA, at The Out of the Blue Gallery. At 7:00 p.m. on March 24th, Elizabeth will read at Falmouth Public Library on Cape Cod. Finally, check out this new piece on Elizabeth and We Got Him by bestselling author Caroline Leavitt.

soap-opera-confidentialElizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) soon will be reading proofs of Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow as the World Turns Restlessly to the Guiding Light of Our Lives (McFarland). The life-long soap fans are delighted to have so many Stonecoast voices—current and past—in this collection of essays. In order of appearance in the book, past and present contributors from our community include Aaron Hamburger, Brenda Sparks Prescott, Ann Hood, Lesléa Newman, Shara McCallum, Nancy Holder, Ted Deppe, Marie Hannan-Mandel, Tigh Rickman, Erin Roberts, Susan Lilley, and Jamie Cat Callan. Stay tuned for the exact publication date and a schedule of readings… Suzanne is looking forward to being on two panels at AWP in DC this month, and thanks the hosts for including her. On Thursday, February 9, find her on Washington Convention Center Level 2, Room 209 ABC, from 10:30-11:45 a.m. as a panelist on Elizabeth Searle’s “Adaptation in Three Acts: Adventures in Adapting Material for Scripts.” Other panelists will include Danny Eaton, who wrote the one-woman play Mags: A Conversation With an Audience, based on Suzanne’s book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both (PFP). From 4:30 to 5:45 p.m., find her again on Level Two, this time in Room 203 AB, for Helen Peppe’s panel “Juggling from Within: The Art of Voice,” also featuring Sue William Silverman, Alice Cohen, and Melanie Brooks. Speaking of Melanie Brooks, Suzanne is looking forward to the launch of Melanie’s first book, Writing Hard Stories (Beacon), at AWP, and also to introducing her when Melanie reads from her book Wed., February 15, at 7:00 p.m. at Broadside Bookshop, 247 Main St., Northampton, MA. Any Stonecoasters in the Western New England area are invited to meet up at the Broadside and cheer Melanie on as she begins to get this vital title into the world.

 

 

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Community News & Updates January 2017

Stonecoast Rocks Manhattan….

Calling all Stonecoasters past and present in the New York City area—please join us on Wednesday, January 4th, 2017, for a special Stonecoast Night at the KGB Bar in Manhattan, 85 E. 4th St. from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. Featured faculty readers will be Jeanne Marie Beaumont, Elizabeth Searle, and Breena Clarke. Joining in with flash readings will be students and alums Daniel Ball, Peter Behravesh, Anthony D’Aries, Jessica de Koninck, Gro Flatebo, Lissa Kiernan, Erin Roberts, and Alex Sherman. Please come to cheer and toast the New Year. We hope to see many of you there!

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) received a 2016 Jane Morrison Film Fund grant and a 2017 Fellowship in Literature from the Maine Arts Commission.

boundaries-withoutKaren Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled her story “What the Dollhouse Said” is scheduled to air on the Pseudopod Podcast on January 13, 2017. Her zombie masters vs robot apocalypse flash fiction “We Are Still Feeling,” originally published in alumni Cynthia Kraack’s Boundaries Without: The Calumet Editions 2017 Anthology of Speculative Fiction on October 29, 2016, will be reprinted in Sockdolager magazine’s Women of War Special Issue, Winter 2017. MK Gibson’s interview Karen Bovenmyer – Drop and Give me 20! 20 Hard Questions for Hard Authors was published on November 30, 2016, revealing Karen’s biggest failure, greatest shame and what Frankenstein, a bunch of grapes, and a broken closet door have to do with it. She also goes on and on about how wonderful you all are in the Stonecoast program. Another interview promoting her forthcoming fantasy novella “The Beaded Slipper” in Crimson Edge Press’s Maidens and Magic anthology went live on December 11. In her role as nonfiction editor for Mothership Zeta Magazine, Karen is assisting alumna Mur Lafferty in preparing the January issue (#6), which will include an awesome story from alumna Jennifer Castello and a Story Doctor article from faculty member James Patrick Kelly.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) received a Pushcart Prize nomination for her essay “Two Strangers on a Train,” published in Jabberwock Review.

Michael L Joy (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been voted to the board of the Florida chapter of the Mystery Writers of America for 2017.

Alan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book Point Blank was named among the “Ten Best Poetry Books of 2016” by Beltway Poetry. He also just finished a new trailer for the book, which you can watch here.kinship-of-clover

Joe M. McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) new novel, The Fortress at the End of Time, about clones on a military listening station in deep space, comes out on January 17 from Tor.com.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ’06) is delighted to share the cover of her third novel, Kinship Of Clover. She will be signing copies at the Red Hen Press booth at AWP and reading at Politics & Prose on February 10, 6:00 p.m.

midsummer-magickHarlequin has picked up all three books in The Magick Trilogy by Laura Navarre (Popular Fiction, W’11) for its paranormal romance DTC program. Midsummer Magick, a sexy Tudor fallen angel romance about the son of Lucifer and a secret Tudor princess, is a January 2017 release.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) full length play The King of France has won this year’s Meetinghouse Theatre Lab’s play competition and will receive a staged reading in Winter Harbor on January 21 at 7:00 p.m. at Hammond Hall, 427 Main Street, Winter Harbor, ME 04693. The event is free and open to the public and will feature a talk back with the playwright and actors following the performance. The play set in the fictional town of Hopton Maine in Aroostock County examines both the deep pull of that region on its inhabitants and its serious limitations for young people, as well as the devastating effects of isolation and abuse. For information please call 207-963-2569 or contact Schoodic Arts for All at info@schoodicartsforall.org.

cold_heart_coverKaren Pullen‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) second mystery novel, Cold Heart, will be released by Five Star Cengage on January 18. The series features an undercover drug agent who is pulled into a homicide investigation. In November, her story “No Falling Ribbons” was included in an anthology, Stuck in the Middle (Main Street Rag).

STUDENTS

Brenda Cooper‘s (Fiction) novel, Edge of Dark , won the 2016 Endeavour Award, which was presented ay Orycon in November, 2016.  The Endeavour award is “…for a edge-of-darkdistinguished Science Fiction or Fantasy Book written by a Pacific Northwest author or authors and published in the previous year.” Edge of Dark, edited by Rene Sears, was published by Prometheus Books in 2015. The award includes a $1,000 cash award and a glass trophy.

FACULTY

Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “One Sister, Two Sisters, Three” published in October in Clarkesworld (read and/or listen to it online here).  has been selected for The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Fourth Annual Collection, edited by Gardner Dozois. This will be Jim’s sixteenth appearance in this anthology series.

we-got-himIn addition to the January 4th KGB reading in New York City, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will read from her new novel We Got Him at the Brookline Booksmith in Brookline, MA, on Jan. 23rd at 7:00 p.m. Elizabeth’s show Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera completed its six-week run in Chicago, fully produced by Underscore Theater. The show was listed as one of the Top Five Musicals of 2016 by New City, which had written in its review: “The play radiates like strobe light hitting a disco ball.  Tonya and Nancy’ relates a cautionary tale of ambition, manipulation, competition and the appalling way men and women treat girls.”  For quotes, pictures, and film clips from Chicago, see: www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

 

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Community News & Updates September 2016

ALUMS

Bailey_SoundofWildSnail_pbk_jkt_rgb_HRThe paperback edition of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S‘15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, launches September 6th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Scholarship ($2500 professional development funds) by the Horror Writers Association. She owes her Stonecoast mentors and classmates so very much and is extremely grateful for this honor and opportunity. Her retelling of murderous little-red-riding-hood, “The Scarlet Cloak,” will be reprinted in Burning Willow Press’s Crossroads in the Dark II: Urban Legends anthology this fall and her dark sci-fi novella tribute to Aliens, “Failsafe,” will be reprinted in Manawaker Studio’s Starward Tales II anthology next year. Her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” appeared in Parsec Inc’s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface Triangulationanthology and is now available for purchase.  Her first novel, a historical piratical romantic LGBT adventure, titled Swift for the Sun, is on schedule for a first quarter 2017 release from DSP Publications. She’s also very excited to announce that she’s sold a flash piece titled “Skin as White as Snow as White as Skin” to Gamut neo-noir magazine some ‘coasters may recognize as inspired by her novel-in-progress The Sleeping Boy, which they helped workshop at residency. She’s thrilled to announce the sale of her poem “Lady of Gold” to Remixt Magazine, especially since it was inspired by a drawing of the same title by Jackson Zorn, a fellow contributor to Stonecoast alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art and Words show. Her lesbian zombie puppeteers vs. terminator robots flash fiction “We Are Still Feeling” will appear in a forthcoming science fiction anthology edited by Stonecoast alumni Cynthia Kraack for Calumet Editions. LONG LIVE STONECOAST!

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “A Pinhole of Light”—which concerns itself with ghost hordes, photography, and transformation—is out in the September/October issue of Black Static. On the podcasting front, episode 116 of Far Fetched Fables and episode 438 of StarshipSofa came out this summer. The first podcast features Julie’s narration of Paul Jessups’s story “Sun Sorrow”; the second includes Julie’s reading of Sunil Patel’s “The Attic of Memories.”

Pinhole

Paula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) has been promoting her novel The Drowning Girls (Mira, 2016) and will be appearing on a thriller writing panel with Kimberly McCreight, Catherine McKenzie, and Emily Bleeker at the Mohegan Sun as part of its Winning Author series on September 30. This summer, Paula spoke on a horror/thriller panel called “Sweet Dreams Aren’t Made of These” at Comic Con with writers Jonathon Maberry and Paul Tremblay. She’ll be featured as part of San Francisco’s LitQuake literary festival on October 15. This fall, she accepted a full-time position as a writing lecturer at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

Mohegan Sun advertisement

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest piece examines post-Olympic depression, and you can read it here. His next book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press in Spring 2017; Bob Costas has written the foreword. John is now putting the finishing touches on his latest crime novel, “The Curiously Confounding Case of Revus Apollo.”

Point Blank by Alan KingAlan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book, Point Blank, which he worked on at Stonecoast with Tim Seibles and Joy Harjo, found a publisher: Silver Birch Press, who will publish it November 2016. Folks can learn more about the book at http://bit.do/PointBlank.

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) is thrilled to announce that Terrapin Books has released  her full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room. For information on ordering or to see a list of places where she will be reading, go to her website: www.jessicadekoninck.com. Cutting RoomShe’d also love to read at a venue near you and welcomes any suggestions.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ’06) is pleased to have her essay “Smoke Signals” published in Guernica.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) will be reading a new as-yet untitled ekphrastic poem as part of Imagistic: 7 Artists, 7 Writers, 7 New Stories, at Hillyer Art Space in Washington, DC, on September 9 at 7:30 p.m. Passehl’s poem is a response to “STC_0002-2 2016-06-08 PFVA” an ethereal infrared photograph of a deer seen in silhouette, by artist Allyson Salomon. The poem interweaves the formal implications of the photograph with imagery, language, and proper names relating to the James River Park area of Virginia, where the photo was taken. In Passehl’s poem, discussion of the meaning, presence or absence of God is bracketed by a brief history of the Charles City County born missionary Lott Cary, and rumination on the fate of the deer. Also: Imagistic is the brainchild of Wales-based writer Carole Burns and artist Paul Edwards, and Passehl participated in a previous Imagistic as a visual artist. This is the first time that she will be one of the featured writers. For more information go the Facebook Event page  or contact Janet at janetpassehl@gmail.com

H is for Hoosier: A State Alphabet, written by Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, W’12has been chosen as the official picture book for Indiana schools during the state’s bicentennial year. The book won a Young Hoosier Book Award. Reynolds has completed The Purple Rose of Chelsea, a history chronicling actor Jeff Daniels’ life and the 25th anniversary of the theater he founded in Chelsea, MI, named for the movie he considers his breakthrough from theater to movies. This book is under consideration for a 2016 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), is pleased that Brevity has accepted a narrative essay for its upcoming special issue on race. (Folks, it took six tries to break into this bucket-list pub!) Lisa’s three linked CNF flash pieces, “Funereal,” appear in Issue 2.2 of Change Seven. In July, Hippocampus Magazine ran her narrative essay “The Amazing Technicolor Horse Dream” in their themed issue on “firsts.” Lisa was recently interviewed on the MFA Director’s Blog for Bay Path University, where she teaches in the all-online, all-CNF program.

Richard Squires (Fiction, S’14) is excited to share that a story of his placed second in the Gemini Magazine 2016 Short Story Contest. In addition to publication in the online journal, he won the $100 prize, which officially makes him a Professional Fiction Writer! Thanks to a number of mentors who helped him with this story: Suzanne Strempek Shea, Rick Bass, and Sarah Braunstein. You can read the story here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Clifford Royal Johns’ (Popular Fiction) storyThe Shooting Gallery will appear as the cover story in the September issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (which publishes monthly).

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction) has a short story, “Wolfy Things,” out in audio fantasy magazine PodCastle. The story was workshopped in Erin’s very first residency (thanks Nancy & co!) and can be either listened to or read online. It is her debut publication and bonus story notes can be found on her website.

FACULTY

Harvard ReviewSarah Braunstein (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has a short story in the current issue of The Harvard Review.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) has three new poems in the online journal Número Cinq. They are included in his new book, Liminal Blue, most easily ordered from Kenny’s Bookshop in Galway, which offers free shipping worldwide.

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Drop City” has just been accepted for publication in a forthcoming Wild Cards mosaic novel, Texas Hold ‘Em, edited by George RR Martin. Publication date is yet to be announced.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Blue Points” will be published in volume five of ImageOutWrite Magazine this fall.

King of Crows IVFor the second time, Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has the honor of having written the best “Worst Play,” a precious adaptation of his literary masterpiece about a drug-addled squirrel and chipmunk in mating season, a 10-minute play so egregious that only one producer in the state of Maine would dare breathe life into it. The play, No One Named Johanna, is only one of a full evening of theatre presented in tasty 10-minute servings that run the gamut from serious drama, to farce, to outrageous comedy, to some that can’t be classified. Each has won the monthly Crowbait Club competition in order to be served up here for you. “King of Crows IV: All Hail The King” will be held at the St Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland, ME, on September 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday Sept 11 at 5:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door or ordered online.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) interviewed on Rob Mclennan’s blog.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will have a six-week run in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, starting November 25, 2016; the run was announced in Broadway World, The Chicago Tribune, and more. The Boston Herald featured an interview with Elizabeth in August about Tonya & Nancy as well as her upcoming novel We Got Him (coming out in November) and the feature film development project on her first novel, A Four-Sided Bed.

Tonya & Nancy

 

 

 

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