Tag Archives: Kristabelle Munson

Community News & Updates September 2015

ALUMNI

Quenton Baker‘s (Poetry, S’12) first chapbook, Diglossic in the Second America, is now available from Punch Press. You can hear him read two of the poems in recent radio segment with Washington State poet laureate Elizabeth Austen.
diglossic

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) has been honored with a 2015-16 fellowship from the North Carolina Arts Council to support creation of new work. In addition, Sheila has been granted a two-week residency at the Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities in Southern Pines, NC in December. Just before the fellowship news arrived, Sheila had made the difficult decision to decline an offer for two more books in her mystery series to devote time to nonfiction, and she feels well rewarded. They say “follow the money,” but sometimes you have to follow your heart.

Letters to TiptreeKaren Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Bosley Gravel’s Cavalcade of Terror.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) is very happy to see her creative non-fiction essay “Deception in Six Parts” published in the new collection Letters to Tiptree, celebrating the life of famed science fiction writer James Tiptree Jr. (a.k.a. former military officer Alice B. Sheldon). Four of Sandra’s short stories since her graduation from Stonecoast have received Tiptree Award Honor List mentions.

The Girl in the MirrorConstance McKee (Fiction, W’13) is pleased to announce that on September 3 her debut novel, The Girl in the Mirror, will be released by Deeds Publishing. Special thanks to Suzanne Strempek Shea, Boman Desai, and Ted Deppe for the tutelage that led to the completion of this book.

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction, S’15) had a story published by Guernica Magazine & PEN American simultaneously. PEN says: “The Guernica/PEN Flash Series is a collaborative effort in which both journals publish the best flash out there.”

Robert Ortiz (Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, S’14) is happy to announce his new job as an English Affiliate Instructor at Metropolitan State University of Denver.

Love Songs of CarbonJanet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) ironed cloth sculpture Sleep is featured on the cover of U.K. poet Philip Gross’s latest poetry collection Love Songs of Carbon, just released by Bloodaxe Books. Love Songs of Carbon closes with the poem “Thirteen Ways to Fold the Darkness,” which was inspired by Sleep. Sleep is in the collection of the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas, Austin, gift of Laurence Miller, 2015.

“Manhandled,” by Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12), will be published in the September 2015 issue of New Ohio Review. It is an essay about sexual assault in the Alaskan wilderness and is part of her memoir-in-progress.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has been asked to contribute an essay on Bill Gaston’s The Good Body for a critical anthology on Hockey Literature to be edited by noted Canadian writers and scholars, Jamie Dopp and Angie Abdou.

Michaela Roessner (Popular Fiction, S’08) has a short story, “Flattened,” included in Western Weird, this year’s Manifest West anthology. The anthology will be out at the end of August. The art catalog for Viktor Koen’s photomontage bestiary is now published and includes Roessner’s ekphrastic accompaniment, “Mormo,” along with the works of other contributing writers.

PenelopePenelope Anne Schwartz (f/k/a Penelope Schwartz Robinson; Creative Nonfiction, S’04) has recently published two new books of nonfiction: Penelope: Weaving and Unraveling, a Writing and Revising Life, a memoir of her writing life from 1970-2014; and When Lilacs Last, the McLaughlin Garden, an historical biography of Bernard McLaughlin, the “Dean of Maine Gardeners.” Her essay collection Slippery Men was chosen by Katha Pollitt for the Stonecoast Book Prize and published by New Rivers Press in 2009. Schwartz lives in Arcata, California, and teaches in the English Department of the College of the Redwoods in Eureka.

Kevin St. Jarre (Popular Fiction, S’10) will be reading with poet Carmen Mandley and current Stonecoast student Elisha Webster Emerson at LFK, 188A State St, Portland, Maine on September 7, 2015. Drinks at 8:00 p.m., readings start at 9:00 p.m.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) horror story—and her first Stonecoast-workshopped story!—“The Devil’s Hands” appeared in the most recent issue of Black Static. Her Little Mermaid retelling “Sisters” appeared in Scheherazade’s Bequest. Her flash fiction “No Eyes” appeared in Psychopomp. And another flash fiction,”Mrs. Stiltskin,” was reprinted in audio version in Podcastle.

Growing a New TailGrowing a New Tail, Lisa C. Taylor’s (Poetry, S’04) debut collection of short fiction, will launch in Ireland in September and in the U.S. in late October. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press. Watch the book trailer here: https://vimeo.com/133364023

Marco Wilkinson‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) lyric memoir, Madder, which was his Stonecoast thesis, was a semi-finalist for the Cleveland State University 2015 Essay Collection Prize.

In late June, Anne Witty (Poetry, W’12) “published” a work that could best be described as a 4,400-square-foot three-dimensional book. The occasion was the grand opening of a new permanent exhibition for Mystic Seaport in Mystic, Connecticut. Entitled “Voyaging in the Wake of the Whalers,” the exhibit looks at the impact of the whaling industry on American history and culture. It features objects, still and moving images, short explanatory texts, excerpts from literature, poetry (including an excerpt from Tony Barnstone’s  “Parable in Praise of Violence”), song, underwater sound, computer interactives, and much more. The project crowns Mystic Seaport’s many years’ work to restore and sail the last remaining American whaleship, the Charles W. Morgan (built in 1841), with an in-depth look at whaling’s continued effects on America. Creating museum exhibits, like creating books, requires many different skills. Anne’s freelance work as Guest Curator included writing, research, guiding object and image selection, and consultation in other areas (including an appearance in the exhibit’s orientation film). Other team members contributed 3-D design, graphics design, computer interactives, song and sound recordings, special expertise on whales and American whaling history, design and construction coordination, and many other pieces of the three-dimensional puzzle. If any Stonecoasters are interested in learning more about script-writing for exhibits and its kinship with screenwriting and other forms of non-fiction and fiction, please get in touch with Anne at witty[at]gwi.net.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has sold the fourth Cass Neary novel, The Book of Lamps and Banners, to St. Martin’s Press/Macmillan, with audio rights to the third and fourth novels going to Blackstone Audio. All four books have also been sold in Sweden. Liz’s most recent reviews include Austin Grossman’s Crooked, and Ann and Jeff Vandermeer’s Sisters of the Revolution, both for The Los Angeles Times.

Demons of the HellmouthNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is proud to announce that she has helped Rupert Giles, who served as the Watcher of Vampire Slayer Buffy Summers, take his newest book to publication. Demons of the Hellmouth: A Guide for Slayers (Titan Books) will debut September 29. Giles’s dear friend, the actor Anthony Stewart Head, wrote the introduction.

The latest installment of Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) column in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine “Welcome to Asimov’s” profiles ten new writers who have recently made their first sale to Asimov’s. His oft-reprinted story “Think Like A Dinosaur” has been selected to be translated for a new and as yet unnamed anthology that will introduce contemporary North American science fiction to the readers in Cuba. Jim plans to visit Cuba in the spring of 2016.

duck and cover--2015-with WB & PR bannerMike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover has been nominated for 8 “Desert Star Awards” in Palm Springs, CA, including “Outstanding Production: Comedy.” For those in the northeast, Duck and Cover will open September 4 at The Players’ Ring Theatre (Portsmouth, NH) and run through Sept 20th. Duck and Cover is about a sheltered American family in 1962 suburbia trying to hold on to its innocence in the era of civil rights riots, birth control pills, rock ‘n’ roll, and an unexpected visit from closeted jazz trumpeter Uncle Bunny and his African-American band-mate and partner on the night that the Cuban Missile Crisis begins. Duck and Cover received the 2014 John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award (New England Theatre Conference) and was also awarded “Best Play” at the Northern Writes Festival (Penobscot Theatre Co, Bangor, Maine) and “Audience Favorite” at the Dezart Performs Festival of New Plays (Palm Springs, CA). The Players’ Ring Theatre has intimate, three-quarter-round seating for 70 (general admission), so reservations are encouraged.

Benedict_Hair_pbkflps_comp.inddElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an essay in the new anthology: Me, My Hair and I: Twenty-Seven Women Untangle an Obsession, released in September 2015 from Algonquin Books, edited by Liz Benedict. Elizabeth’s essay—“Act-Tresses: Hair as Performance Art”—has just been published on the online literary magazine, Solstice. Elizabeth will be reading from the anthology with Liz Benedict at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA, on October 5th. For other upcoming readings and events see  http://www.elizabethsearle.net

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Community News & Updates May 2015

Stonecoast in Ireland

Stonecoast in Ireland will host its 20th residency in January 2016. Information and applications are available from Ted Deppe at theodore.deppe@maine.edu. The deadline for applying is 14 May 2015.

Alumni

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is honored to have learned that guest editor Rebecca Skloot has selected Sheila’s essay “A Question of Corvids” for inclusion in the 2015 Best Science and Nature Writing anthology, to be published this fall by Houghton Mifflin. The essay, an earlier version of which was Sheila’s graduation reading, won the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Award for Creative Nonfiction and has been nominated for a Pushcart Award.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction S ’11) her novel Elysium received the 2014 Philip K. Dick Award Special Citation at Norwescon 38 in Seattle, WA.

Meg Elison, Rod Duncan,  Emmi Itäranta, and Jennifer Marie Brissett (l-r)

Meg Elison, Rod Duncan, Emmi Itäranta, and Jennifer Marie Brissett (l-r)

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Raising Babies”—inspired by memories of southern Indiana,”The Yellow Wallpaper,” and spring—is now available in issue 145 of Crack the Spine.

Sarah R. Flynn (Popular Fiction, W’15) has a piece forthcoming in the July issue of The Writer magazine. The feature article outlines how to create a writing workshop for adult literacy students and was influenced by her third semester project and graduate presentation. This is her first professional sale.

Cynthia Kraack‘s (Fiction, W’10) first literary novel, The High Cost of Flowers, is one of three finalists in two categories of the 25th Anniversary Midwest Book Awards: Literary Fiction and Contemporary Fiction. The competition, sponsored by the Midwest Independent Publishing Association, is judged by experts from all aspects of the book world. They select winners and finalists from a 12-state region based on overall excellence. Cynthia’s first speculative fiction novel, Minnesota Cold, won the 2009 Northeastern Book Award for Fiction.

Mur Lafferty (Popular Fiction, W’14) will be the editor-in-chief and Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be non-fiction editor of Escape Artists’ new speculative fiction e-zine this fall. Issue zero is slated for an August release. Escape Artists are best known for the Escape Pod, Pod Castle, and PseudoPod podcasts.

HazardousMaterial-1Matthew Quinn Martin’s (Popular Fiction, S’10) novella Nightlife: Hazardous Material will be released by Pocket Star/Simon & Schuster on May 11. T.L. Costa, critically acclaimed author of Playing Tyler, has called the book “A taut, mesmerizing tale of horror, madness and video games. It’s as if Stephen King penned Ready Player One. Readers will devour this in one sitting.”

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) has a new essay, “Crossing Borders in Fiction,” in The Cleaver magazine, here.

For the second year in a row, Roxanne Ocasio (Popular Fiction, W’15) and Kristabelle Munson (Fiction, current) have been accepted into the prestigious VONA/Voices writers’ workshop in Miami. Co-founded by Junot Diaz, VONA is the only writers’ conference in the country with a multi-genre focus on writers of color as students and teachers.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’11) has had her latest manuscript, Lost Property Hotline, accepted for April 2016 publication by Biblioasis. Her poem “Margaret Rose” (previously published in The Walrus) will be appearing in Best Canadian Poetry 2015. This has been a busy time for Alexandra, who is also celebrating the release of Measure for Measure: An Anthology of Poetic Meters (Random House/Everyman), co-edited with Annie Finch. Here she is in action earlier this month, reading at the Tree Series in Ottawa:

Janet Passehl’s (Poetry, S’10) poems “Dear Colum,” and “his rented left brother and bottle of yellow music” are published in Calibanonline 19.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) poem “Think of Sophia Loren” will appear in the 2015 edition of Stolen Island Review. He recently played the principal role in the short film Harvey’s Dream adapted from the Stephen King story of the same name that appeared in The New Yorker several years ago. In addition to playing Harvey, he consulted with the writer-director, Ryan Shelley, on the script. A fall premier is to be scheduled at the University of Maine.

“Side Effects,” a short story by Karen Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08), will appear in Reed Magazine, Issue 68, in May. In January, Karen’s story “Brown Jersey Cow” was published online by Every Day Fiction, the once-a-day flash fiction magazine.

Michaela Roessner-Herman‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) short story “Flattened” has been picked for inclusion in the Western Weird anthology, the Speculative Fiction edition of the Manifest West literary anthology series.

Beth Slattery‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’10) essay, “Hello to All That,” which explores Joan Didion’s writing, was published in the Spring 2015 issue of Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Study.

J.G. Strauss (Fiction, S’14) will read from her novel-in-progress, The Three Lives of Gráinne Ó Mháille as part of Cape Whale at SEA Space in Provincetown, MA, on May 1st, 2015.

unnamed

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) fairy tale story “Dance Our Shoes to Pieces” appeared in the most recent issue of Farrago’s Wainscot“An Exodus of Wings” has been reprinted in the audio magazine The Drabblecast“Six Ways to Break Her” appeared on the newly-designed SmokeLong Quarterly along with an interview“The Way of Things” appeared in Crack the Spine alongside another interview.

Ashley Warren‘s (Fiction, S’12) short story “Cataphile” has been selected as an honorable mention for Volume 27 of Allegory.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has retired from the Catawba County (NC) Library System. Her  9-year library newspaper column has converted to a more general one titled “Fork in the Road.” Her essays are also posted on her website.

Students

Elisabeth Tova Bailey‘s (Creative Nonfiction) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, was published by Algonquin Books in 2010. Now the digital audiobook has just been released by audible.com. The CD edition of the audiobook will launch from Brilliance in July with narration by Renee Raudman. The Chicago Tribune audiobook review is here.

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction) has been invited to give a presentation at Queers & Comics, the first university conference for queer cartoonists and comics writers with keynote speakers Alison Bechdel and Howard Cruse. Kristabelle will show pages of a graphic novella written at Stonecoast.

Marian Romero‘s (Popular Fiction) poem “A portrait of the witch at sixteen” was featured in Abyss and Apex online magazine.

Faculty

Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has accepted a tenure-track position as assistant professor in the English department at the University of New Hampshire, beginning in fall 2015. He’ll be teaching both in the MFA and undergraduate creative writing programs.

Ted and Annie Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) will be giving a poetry reading at the Connemara Mussel Festival, Mweelrea Hotel, Tully Cross, Ireland, at 6:00 p.m. on 2 May 2015. They will also be reading on the Aran Islands on 21 May for Old Dominion University. Ted’s next U.S. reading has been confirmed for Old Dominion University in Virginia on 8 October 2015.

Beauty and the Beast - Some Gave AllNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new book out: Beauty and the Beast: Some Gave All, based on the Beauty and the Beast reboot on the CW. She and Stonecoast alumna Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) have a new column titled “Writing Reading Guides” in the Science Fiction Writers of America Bulletin.

When astronauts overcorrect a negative turtle jacket on their high-tail thruster, initiating precautionary self-destruct protocol, they have only one recourse: radio Mission Control. Unfortunately, Mission Control has been privatized. Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute play Houston will be staged at the Boston Theatre Marathon—50 ten-minute plays, written by 50 playwrights, produced by 50 theatre companies in one day: Sunday, May 10, starting at 12:00 p.m. at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts, 527 Tremont Street, Boston. Houston will also be staged in Portland, Maine, at the Maine Playwrights’ Festival—seven short plays by Maine playwrights May 13-16 at the St. Lawrence Arts Center.

HoustonElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: the Rock Opera—will be produced in New York City this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with multiple performances in July, dates TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but she hopes to see some Stonecoasters at “ringside” at the show. Check out the coverage in Theater Mania. For info and updates on performances and tickets, visit www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

Poster from previous Boston production; NYC dates TBD.

Poster from previous Boston production; NYC dates TBD.

 

 

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Community News & Updates March 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is pleased to announce her story “The Scarlet Cloak” will be reprinted in Life After Ashes, an anthology published by Alliteration Ink to benefit a military family who lost everything in a fire.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S ’11) will be on panel at the Astro Blackness 2 Conference, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA.

Atro Blackness 2 Conference

xiii_webJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Pretty Little Boxes” is now available in the Resurrection House anthology XIII edited by Mark Teppo.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has recently sung the US and Canadian anthems at UMaine men’s and women’s hockey and basketball games, and will sing them again at the opening ceremonies for US National Alpine Skiing Championships next month at Sugarloaf USA. Currently he’s playing the part of Harvey in Harvey’s Dream, a short film based on the Stephen King story of the same name being filmed in Bangor. He will be reading at the Poetry & Science Reading on Sunday, March 22, at 1:00 p.m. at The Rock & Art Shop, 38 Central St. in downtown Bangor, and again at the annual Poet’s Speak on April 4th in Bangor. He would also ask that anyone who has recently published a book that deals with sports—in the broadest sense—consider sending a copy for possible discussion on his weekly Sports Lit 101 segment on the Downtown with Rich Kimball Show heard in Eastern and Central Maine on WZON 620 AM on Wednesday at approximately 4:35 p.m. The station is also available on the web and on the free WZON app.

Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12; formerly Tamie Harkins) won second place for her essay “David the Green Dragon Goes to the Opera” in the Literal Latte essay competition. The essay can be read online here.

Gina Troisi (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) is happy to announce that her essay, “The Angle of Flickering Light,” was recently published in Fourth Genre‘s Spring 2015 issue (17.1). Her email is ginatroisi@yahoo.com.

Dumped coverThe anthology Dumped: Stories of Women Unfriending Women is now available! This anthology, edited by Nina Gaby, contains the work of twenty-five women writers, including six Stonecoast students, alumnae, and faculty. The book explores “the fragile, sometimes humorous, and often unfathomable nature of lost friendship.” Stonecoasters included in the book are: Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Kristabelle Munson (Fiction), Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14), Judith Podell (Fiction, ’06), Julie L. Vandekreke (Creative Nonfiction, S’10), and faculty member Elizabeth Searle. A selection of the SC contributors to the anthology will participate in a reading at the summer 2015 residency with books available for purchase. To hear editor Nina Gaby interviewed about the book on ListenUP! Talk Radio, click here.

STUDENTS

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction) won the title of The Flash at the Boskone Flash Fiction Slam. Kristabelle took first place and was invited to compete at the New Hampshire Institute of Art for the NH Writers’ Project Three-Minute Fiction Slam.

FACULTY

German The Sacred Band CoverBlanvalet will publish the German edition of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) final Acacia novel, The Sacred Band (Reiche Ernte), on March 16th.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) served as a judge for the Bethesda Magazine Fiction Contest.  Also, his Stonecoast-themed essay “How a Gay Guy from the City Found his Inner Rugged Country Boy in Snowy Maine” appeared on Matador.

On Wednesday, March 4th, at 7:30 p.m., The Provincetown Theater (238 Bradford Street, Provincetown, MA 02657 | 508-487-7487) will present a staged reading of Mike Kimball‘s play Best Enemies, the story two cowboys, lone survivors of a sabotaged rodeo cruise, who are marooned together on a tiny desert island. To preserve their sanity, they’ve invented imaginary geography and instituted a system of laws, but ultimately they go to war over their shared cowboy hat. As they rob each other of food and sleep, and their carefully constructed universe begins to unravel, each man faces his death and, in so doing, each begins examining his life. The Portland Phoenix called it “A sly, haunting, and remarkably fun new existential comedy.”

Scene from Best Enemies.

Scene from Best Enemies.

Poetry faculty members Eléna Rivera and Stephen Motika read in San Francisco March 22, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. at CCA Writers Studio, co-presented by the Poetry Center. The reading is a celebration of the work of Kathleen Fraser on her 80th birthday with participants including Bev Dahlen, Frances Richard, John Sakkis, Brenda Hillman, Robin Tremblay-McGaw, Linda Russo, Brian Teare, Latasha Diggs, Eléna Rivera, Lauren Shufran, Stephen Motika, and Susan Gevirtz. Also, Eléna reads in New York on Wednesday, March 25, 2015, as part of “Collection Processed by Poets: Five Writers Respond to the Wagner Labor Archive”; other poets reading are John Keene, Robert Fitterman, Paolo Javier, and Johannah Rodgers. The reading is at the Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University, Bobst Library, 10th floor. The event is co-sponsored by Nightboat Books.

Mags Riordan, the subject of Suzanne Strempek Shea’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, is returning to New England in March for two weeks of talks. Riordan, a native of Ireland, ten years ago founded The Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Cape Maclear, Malawi, in memory of her son who drowned in Lake Malawi in 1999. The former high school guidance counselor now lives in the African nation and runs the clinic that has served more than 275,000 people in an area that previously had one doctor for 800,000 people. Since its publication last year, This Is Paradise has been featured in publications in the U.S. and Ireland, including the Boston Globe, Yankee magazine and The Irish Times. Copies of This Is Paradise and Shea’s ten other books will be available for sale and signing at all events, which are open to the public free of charge. Crafts from Cape Maclear also will be sold to benefit the clinic. Kelly’s Books to Go will be selling at both Maine events, so stop by and say hi to Kelly, too. The schedule:

March 19, 7:30 p.m., Cheshire United Methodist Church, 205 Academy Road, Cheshire, CT.
March 23, 6:00-7:30 p.m., Centerville Public Library, 585 Main St., Centerville, MA.
March 24, 7:00 p.m., Maine Irish Heritage Center, 34 Gray St., Portland, ME
March 25, 12:00-1:00 p.m., Wells Public Library, Route 1, Wells, ME
March 25, 7:00-8:30 p.m., West Springfield Public Library, 11 Main St., West Springfield, MA.
March 26, 7 p.m., Kingston Public Library, 6 Green St., Kingston, MA. With Marianne Leone.
March 27, dinner event, time TBA, Ludlow Country Club, Ludlow, MA.
March 28, 2:00 p.m., Sandwich Public Library, 142 Main St., Sandwich, MA.

For more information, visit www.suzannestrempekshea.com or write the author at sess7(at)comcast.net

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) and Annie Deppe of Co. Galway, Ireland, were the visiting writers last month at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA, where Suzanne Strempek Shea is writer in residence. They spoke to and wrote with classes and gave a reading open to the public, and Ted gave a presentation on “Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous” at the university’s eleventh Writers’ Day, February 14. Taking second prize for longest distance covered to get to Longmeadow was grad Penny Guisinger, who braved several of the many February snowstorms to drive from Lubec, ME, to present a Writers’ Day talk on “You Should Get a Grant for That! Applying for Funding to Support Your Writing—A Nuts and Bolts Approach.” Suzanne sends many thanks to all the Stonecoasters, past and present and including Stonecoast Ireland alums, who attended the events.

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe reunite with Stonecoast grad and Stonecoast Ireland participant Melanie Brooks at Bay  Path University in Longmeadow, MA.

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe reunite with Stonecoast grad and Stonecoast Ireland participant Melanie Brooks at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA.

Penny Guisinger begins her talk at Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day.

Penny Guisinger begins her talk at Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Stonecoast Reviewa journal edited and produced by students at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, is now accepting submissions of literary fiction, pop fiction, nonfiction and poetry, for their third and fourth issues. Emerging and established writers welcome. (Deadline: APRIL 1st)

 

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Community News & Updates February 2015

ALUMNI

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) is happy to announce that Medallion Press has acquired his novel The Time Train. It will be released in 2016.

Jennifer Marie Brissett‘s (Popular Fiction S’11) debut novel Elysium has been listed as a Locus New and Notable Book and also has been nominated for the 2014 Philip K. Dick Award. She will be reading and signing with Carlos Hernandez at the NYRSF Reading Series in SoHo on February 3rd.

13coverimage Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Church of Forgotten Gods” is out in the latest issue of the magazine A cappella Zoo.

Terri Glass’s (Creative Nonfiction / Poetry, S’13) haiku chapbook, Birds, Bees, Trees, Love, Hee Hee will be forthcoming from Finishing Line Press in mid-March. Cait Johnson states, “Glass delivers her crystalline observations of nature—and of being human—with incisive thrust and an unexpected wry humor. I could spend hours happily inhabiting these beautiful miniature worlds, each so alive, so sensual, so ultimately delicious. Like gems shining with concentrated brilliance, here we find language and insight distilled to the bone.” To order, click here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) recently enjoyed having her first flash fiction publication at Stirring: A Literary Collection. She’d love for you to read “Speaking in English, Speaking in Sudanese” here. Her memoir piece, “Saudade,” which was originally published in the Stonecoast Review, will be reprinted in Hippocampus Magazine in May 2015. Her email is lesleyheiser@yahoo.com.

Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11) is a 2014 Julie Suk Award finalist for best poetry book by an independent press.

Flowers-COVERIt has been a busy six months for Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10). Leaving Ashwood, the final book in the dystopian Ashwood trilogy, was released by North Star Press. In December, Calumet Editions released The High Cost of Flowers, a literary novel. The opening chapters of this book were reviewed in workshop sessions at Stonecoast. The High Cost of Flowers follows a family adapting to the rapid decline of its matriarch from heart disease and dementia.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold the short story “Farmer” to Analog Magazine, an excerpt of an unpublished novel.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) sold the story “The Cthulhu Navy Wife,” a Lovecraftian mash-up, to the anthology The Mammoth Book of Cthulhu for publication later this year. She tweets about markets, writing tips, and more @sandramcdonald.

22999456Ellen Meeropol‘s (Fiction, W’06) second novel, On Hurricane Island, will launch on March 3 at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA, with events scheduled in Massachusetts, Virginia, New York, Texas, Minneapolis, and Calfifornia (full event schedule here). Former Stonecoast faculty member Walter Wetherell writes that “Meeropol takes on the complexities and dangers of contemporary life in a novel that starts fast and ratchets up the tension all the way to the end.” On Hurricane Island can be pre-ordered from Red Hen Press.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) has an untitled poem in Caliban Online 18.

Michaela Roessner-Herman (Popular Fiction, S’08) just wrapped up a year of serving as one of the judges on the 2014 Philip K. Dick science fiction award panel.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) had three original stories out in January: “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth” in Lightspeed (cross-published on io9), “Everything Beneath You” in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, and “Nostalgia” in Interzone“The Damaged” was reprinted in Story; it first appeared in the January 2014 issue of Interzone. Her story “Six Ways to Break Her” appeared on SmokeLong Quarterly, accompanied by her mother’s artwork.

STUDENTS

David Arroyo‘s (Poetry) poem “Eve’s Cheeseburger” was published in the January issue of Stirring.

FACULTY

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) and Annie Deppe will be giving a reading on 12 February at 7:00 p.m., Breck Suite, Wright Hall, Bay Path University, Longmeadow, MA (free and open to the public). On 14 February, Ted will give a talk on writing titled “Taking it All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous,” at Bay Path’s Writer’s Day from 11:05 a.m. to 12:20 p.m.  On Thursday 5 March at 7:00 p.m., Ted and Annie will give a reading at Trinity House, at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, FL (free and open to the public).  On Wednesday 25 March, at 8:00 p.m. Ted and Annie will read at the Maier Museum of Art, 1 Quinlan Street, Randolph College, Lynchburg, VA (free and open to the public).

1-Marquart_Small Buried Things_2015Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem, “Lament,” was published in New Letters Magazine (Issue 81.1) in December of 2014 and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She was awarded the 2014 Paumanok Poetry Award from Farmingdale State College, New York, and in November 2014 she read from her prize-winning work at the college. She was invited by the North Dakota Humanities Council to travel in North Dakota for six weeks in January and February of 2015 to do field research and teach creative writing workshops in several communities impacted by the oil boom.  The name of the project is Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015. Debra’s poetry collection, Small Buried Things, will be published by New Rivers Press in March of 2015.

Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015.

Our People. Our Places. Our Stories. 2015.

 

DumpedCoverElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) joins fellow Stonecoasters Kristabelle Munson, Alexis Paige, Judith Podell, Penny Guisinger and Julie L. Vandekreke as contributing authors in the new anthology Dumped: Stories of Women Unfriending Women, which is now available as a pre-order on Amazon and which was reviewed as “gripping from beginning to end” on MomsRising. Watch for news of an AWP reading for this anthology:  www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) looks forward to welcoming Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Mass., where they’ll visit classes for a week. The university, where Suzanne is writer in residence, well host a reading by both Ted and Annie Feb. 12 at 7:00 p.m. in Breck Suite on campus. The event is free and open to the public. Copies of books by both Ted and Annie will be sold.

On Feb. 14, Ted will speak on “Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous” at  the university’s eleventh Writers’ Day. Other speakers will include Stonecoast alum Penny Guisinger, who’ll talk about grant writing, and former Stonecoast faculty member Roland Merullo, who’ll talk about conquering the demons of the blank page. Information including schedule, fees and how to register is available at http://www.baypath.edu/news-and-events/writers-day

The Irish Times recently published an essay by Suzanne and an excerpt from her book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, and African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, about the work of Irishwoman Mags Riordan and the medical clinic she founded in Malawi in memory of a son who drowned there. Southern Maine readers interested in meeting Mags Riordan are invited to the Maine Irish Heritage Center, at the corner of State and Gray Streets in Portland, March 24 at 7:00 p.m. Mags will give and update on the clinic. Copies of This Is Paradise and craft items from Malawi will be offered for sale. The center will be charging a $5 admission fee.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Via Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction): Stonecoast Reviewa journal edited and produced by students at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, is now accepting submissions of literary fiction, popular fiction, nonfiction and poetry, for their third and fourth issues. Emerging and established writers welcome. (Deadline: revolving)

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates August 2014

Those in the Stonecoast community who’d like to send a message of support to alum Beth Wilkins Lombardo (Fiction) as she deals with a serious health issue are invited to join the crowd of well-wishers at CaringBridge. Financial donations are being accepted here.

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction / Cross Genre, S’13) has won Prime Number Magazine‘s Creative Nonfiction contest, judged by Ned Stuckey-French, for her essay “A Question of Corvids.” The essay will be published in Prime Number Magazine in the fall and in the Prime Number Magazine, Editors’ Selections 2015 print annual. Sheila also had two poems published in July: “To a Kurdish Child” appears in Red Earth Review, and “Spin” appears in The Written River: A Journal of Eco-Poetics (free online).

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) continues to sneak genre fiction into literary venues—her haunted house short story “Something So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in Festival Writer‘s upcoming flash fiction issue (the publication of offsite AWP’s & M/MLA’s Festival of Language).

Julie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) flash piece “Drinking Grandma’s Tea” is now available in the online magazine Bartleby Snopes. If you feel so inclined, you can cast a vote to make it their Story of the Month; voting is open for the first few days of August.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has another novel due out August 19th. Blind Moon Alley (Prometheus/Seventh Street Books) is the second in a series of crime novels featuring Jersey Leo, an albino bartender working in an underground speakeasy during Prohibition. The book has already garnered excellent reviews, including a starred review from Publishers Weekly. Find out more at John’s website.

ZomburbiaAugust will see the release of Adam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) debut novel, Zomburbia, on the 26th. The book was given a very nice review by Kirkus. Here’s the pull quote: “Comics author Gallardo nails her voice—likable yet self-absorbed… the interpersonal drama strikes a comfortable balance with undead action. More brains than your average zombie novel…and more entrails as well!” More information about the book may be found at Adam’s web site, www.adamgallardo.com.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) is on a roll. Her second novel, The Beginning Things, will be published through Underground Voices in May 2015, and her first poetry collection, Bone Song, won the Liam Rector First Book Price 2014 and will be published through Briery Creek Press (Longwood University), also in May 2015.

July 25th was big for Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13). Two pieces went live at online magazines on the same day! “Route Nine: Bangor to Lubec” appeared at Guernica, and “Batboy is Disappointed” went up in the new issue of Proximity. Later that afternoon, her name appeared in a Tweet for the first time! (She wonders if this is the big time?)

unnamedLissa Kiernan‘s (Poetry, S’11) first poetry collection—Two Faint Lines in the Violet—was published in July by Negative Capability Press. Her collection explores poetry’s unique ability to document yet revision the nuclear age, how when singing somewhere between the personal and political—if we listen closely—we might hear the social. She will be reading from her book on August 6th at Bar Thalia2537 Broadway at 95th St., New York, NY 10025. For future readings, videopoems, audiopoems, and more, visit twofaintlines.com.

PillarsPaul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) is once again writing for Obsidian Entertainment. This time he’s working on their upcoming Almanac of the Eastern Reach, 2823 AI—For Colonists, Explorers, and Curiosity-Seekers, which is one of the Kickstarter rewards for Pillars of Eternity. He previously wrote their Collector’s Edition book, which should be available this Winter.

An image of Janet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) 2011 installation “Dam,” at St. Cecelia Convent In Brooklyn, New York, appears in Ploughshares Fall 2014 issue accompanying “Before Letting Go,” flash fiction by Carole Burns.

Dam by Janet Passehl

“Dam” by Janet Passehl

Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ’11) is honored that her memoir, Pigs Can’t Swim, is a 2014 New England Book Awards finalist in the company of former Stonecoast faculty Richard Hoffman with his new memoir Love & Fury.

futuredaze2-cover-pcsize-325x477Futuredaze 2: Reprise, edited by Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) and Nancy Holder (Faculty), will be published by Underwords Press on August 12, 2014. Erin will also be appearing at Loncon3 (the World Science Fiction Convention) in August 2014, and her press has launched a new website at www.underwordspress.com.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) story “In-Depthness: Everywhere There Was Wine” has just been published at Grape Collective, and his piece “Taking Heat: Wresting The Jazz Back From Parker Jr.” appeared in Corkzilla. Watkins’ story “Beauty Is A Rare Thing: Building The 2012 Monte Bello” was recently a finalist in the “Blog Post of the Year” category for the 2014 Wine Blog Awards.

FACULTY

Jim Kelly‘s (Popular Fiction) newest story “The Rose Witch” will debut in the August edition of Clarkesworld.  His story “Someday” first appeared in the May issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction.  Two anthologies reprinting Jim’s stories which were scheduled for publication did indeed get published (no surprise!): “Soulcatcher” in The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2014, edited by Rich Horton (June), and “The Promise of Space” in The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection, edited by Gardner Dozois (July).  Jim’s story “The Chimp of the Popes” in The Book of Silverberg, edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schafer, was singled out as one of the best in the anthology in a review in the Los Angeles Review of Books. In late June, Jim was tapped as an emergency replacement to teach a week at the Clarion West Writers Workshop in Seattle, WA; he was workshopping three days after being asked.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has Flash Fiction on TheGloriaSirens.com (July 2014). She just had a personal essay accepted in a forthcoming anthology from She Writes Press titled Dumped: Women Unfriending Women—and was happy to learn the anthology also will include Stonecoast stars Kristabelle Munson, Penny Guisinger, Judith Powell, Alexis Paige, and Lindsey Wells.  In addition, Elizabeth is happy to know that she will be joined as contributing author in another forthcoming anthology—Paper Camera from New Rivers Press—by Stonecoast alumnai Nancy Swan.

Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) newest book, This Is Paradise, was the subject of the “Behind the Book” feature in the Julyl 27 Boston Globe. She’s celebrating that while packing her bags for Iota: The Conference of Short Prose on New Brunswick’s beautiful Campobello Island Aug. 14 to 17. The conference is the brainchild of grad Penny Guisinger, who has invited Suzanne to lead the fiction workshop while Barbara Hurd will work with nonfiction writers and Charles Coe will guide the poets. Spaces remain available so please visit the website if you’re interested. After that, Suzanne will be packing for Ireland, where she’ll be promoting This Is Paradise with September readings in Dingle, Howth, Galway, and Clifden. In Galway she will read with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe, and in Clifden her reading will feature a performance by Leo Moran and Anthony Thistlethwaite of the Saw Doctors.

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Community News & Updates November 2013

SCRCoverSpace11The first issue of Stonecoast Review, Stonecoast MFA’s new literary publication, has just been released. You can read the issue here or purchase the issue here. About Stonecoast Review:

The Stonecoast Review is an online literary journal edited by students in the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing. We are inspired by the Stonecoast program’s goals: excellence of craft, independence of voice and an acknowledgement of literature’s responsibility in shaping society. Publishing works of Creative Non-Fiction, Fiction, Poetry, and Popular Fiction, we are especially interested in quality writing that embodies our core values of social and environmental justice, cultural awareness, and international perspectives. We seek submissions from a diversity of writers—both published and emerging. If you would like to contact us with any questions or comments, please direct emails to editor@stonecoastreview.com.

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) will be teaching a workshop and giving a reading at the North Carolina Writers’ Network annual conference in Wrightsville Beach, NC, November 15-17.

Anthony D’Aries‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) essay “Heart of the City” is a finalist for the Diana Woods Memorial Creative Nonfiction Award. His essay will appear in Antioch MFA program’s literary journal, Lunch Ticket. Below is a video of Anthony reading the essay at Literary Fields, a reading series at the Middlesex Lounge in Cambridge, MA:

Kendall Giles’ (Popular Fiction, W’13) macabre short story “Rebel Yell” is in the anthology Surreal South ’13, edited by Josh Woods and published in Press 53. For more information, please visit Kendall’s blog. His flash fiction story “Here to Help” has been selected to be displayed as a part of the ThinkSmall7 art exhibition at the artspace Gallery @ Plant Zero, Richmond, VA, October-December 2013. ThinkSmall is a biennial international miniature invitational exhibition that challenges artists to produce small-scale work with a maximum dimension of 3″ x 3″, and ThinkSmall7 is in the 7th installment in the series. For more information, please read this blog post.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) has three poems in the current issue of Prime Number Magazine: “To My Husband on the One-Year Anniversary of Our Separation,” “Conversation at Tastee Freeze: Stage Five,” and “Hard to Believe.”

Penny Guisinger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “Coming Out” (which was a finalist in the 2013 Essay Contest at Fourth Genre) has now formally been accepted for publication at Fourth Genre and will appear in 2014. Also, she will participate in an online reading for the lit mag Under the Gum Tree on November 15th at 9:00 p.m. EST. The event is physically located in Sacramento, CA, but the broadcast will be streamed live for anyone who wants to watch. For more information, visit her website.

41816_119537834768708_605_nJeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) recently had his poem “Elegy for a Sweathog” accepted by The Museum of Americana and his poem “I told the dentist” accepted by Union Station. In addition, Jeff’s Literary Arts Program, The VOLUME Youth Poetry Project, will host the 15th annual Poetry Night in Ann Arbor this November featuring Aaron Samuels and Kim Addonizio. Finally, Jeff’s youth-run Red Beard Press has released Uncommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning and Living, what the press is calling the ultimate collection of contemporary poems for classroom use. It features over 200 poems from 92 poets, including Stonecoast alums Adrienne Wallner, Kaarrie Waarala, and Teresa Scollon, as well as current and past Stonecoast instructors Tim Seibles, Patricia Smith, David Mura, and Lesléa Newman. Information about how to purchase the book and other Red Beard Press titles can be found here.

In October, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) was hired as a creative consultant and writer on the web series The Day Crew, co-created by Jamie Widdoes and Tim O’Donnell. The Day Crew is the sequel to The 4 to 9ers, an original production of Hulu that was the service’s most-watched original programming last year. The Day Crew is the story of four “millennials” dealing with their first years out of college and living on their own.

Ellen Meeropol‘s (Fiction, W’06) second novel, Hurricane Island, has been sold to Red Hen Press for publication in Spring 2015.

Laura Navarre (Popular Fiction, W’11) signed a deal to co-author her first screenplay with writing partner Steven Denlinger. A dark historical adventure set in medieval France with paranormal and romantic elements, this film adaptation of The Execution by Sharon Cramer goes into pre-production in February. Laura and Steven were also contracted to develop at TV pilot for the series. Laura’s sinister twin, diplomat and playgirl Nikki Navarre, is celebrating the print release this month of her sexy spy romance The Russian Temptation with a Facebook Event on November 20. This “Passport to Suspense” party features six award-winning romantic suspense authors who write in exotic settings. Stop by, comment, and help spread the word for more chances to win a new Kindle Paperwhite and other fun prizes!

9780989512534-BorrowedBike-Panepinto-COVER-v1r4-350x525-200x300Three Rooms Press just published Lisa Panepinto‘s (Poetry, W’13) debut poetry collection, On This Borrowed Bike, available here and here.

“Bleat and Sigh, Night,” the second section of Janet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) extended prose poem written in response to Gertrude Stein’s “Tender Buttons,” will be published in Caliban Online, issue 14, coming out in mid-November. “Bleat and Sigh, Night” was inspired by the “Mutton” section of “Tender Buttons.” (The previous section, “Glazed, blind cushion not mercy,” published in Caliban Online #13, which Janet erroneously attributed to “Mutton,” was actually inspired by Stein’s “Roast Beef.”) Janet will be reading poetry with Basil and Martha King at Infinite Well, 123 Court Street, New Haven, CT, on Wednesday, November 13, at 7:30 p.m.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction ’04) will host Rich Kimball on Downtown, a sports entertainment show on 92.9 FM The Ticket for a regular segment called “Sports Lit 101” where he will discuss literary works, novels, stories and story collections, poems and poetry collections that in some way reference sports. For the next few weeks, the segment will be heard at 4:45 Wednesday afternoons. The program is heard on a network of stations across Maine and may be streamed at www.929theticket.com.

sixfold fall 2013 coverKaren Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08) entered a story in Sixfold‘s writer-judged competition. “Something to Tell Henry” made it through three elimination rounds and was published in their Fall 2013 Fiction issue. She recommends Sixfold—the feedback is honest and extensive from each round of writer-judges. Also, she’s grateful to Stonecoasters Lisa Romeo and Linda Sienkiewicz for recently inviting her onto their blogs.

An essay by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), “Not a Shore Thing,” about her reaction to the destruction of the New Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy last fall and her circuitous relationship with the region, appears in bioStories. Lisa recently taught a series of Writing Your Life Stories interactive seminars at several senior living centers in southern New Jersey.

Adrienne S. Wallner‘s (Poetry, W’09) poem “Letter to Lake Michigan” was featured in the Wisconsin DNR Great Lakes Calendar 2013-2014. “Cheers” and “Morning” will be published in the forthcoming edition of Puff Poetry Prose and a Play, and “Never Fell” has been chosen for inclusion in Uncommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning and Living by Red Beard Press.

“Fit to Kill,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Fall issue of The Main Street Rag.

STUDENTS

beyond_the_pillars___cover_for_kindleErin Lyn Bodin (Fiction) is thrilled to share that her creative nonfiction essay “Waking Up in the City of Joy” has been selected by guest judge Dan Raffel as an Honorable Mention in Tiferet Journal‘s 2013 Writing Contest. Erin is also honored to have her poem, “Heavy,” selected by guest editor Laila Halaby for the most recent volume of Magnolia: A Journal of Women’s Socially Engaged Literature.

Genevieve Williams’ (Popular Fiction) short story “The Girl Whose Name Means Girl” is in the new anthology Beyond the Pillars from Bibliotheca Alexandria. The book is available in print and e-book format.

FACULTY

Tony Barnstone (Poetry, Translation) has won first place in the CZP/Rannu Fund for Writers of Speculative Poetry Prize. He will publish four books in the next year and a half: a new book of poems titles Beast in the Apartment (Sheep Meadows Press, 2014); a selected poems in Spanish translation titled Buda en llamas (Ediciones El Tucan de Virginia, 2014), translated by Mariano Zaro; Dead and Undead Poems (Everyman, 2014) and Human and Inhuman Monsters Poems (Everyman, 2015), both edited with Michelle Mitchell-Faust.

Jeanne Marie Beaumont‘s (Poetry) poem “A Stein’s Sestina” appears in the new anthology The Incredible Sestina Anthology, edited by Daniel Nestor, and she answers questions about her poem in a short interview on the website. She also has a poem in the latest issue of Harvard Review and appears in the new issue of Warwick Review (UK) in their feature on new poetry from the U.S.

BOMAN DESAI DANCING ABOUT ARCHITECTUREBoman Desai (Fiction) has two bits of news: The first chapter from his novel The Lesbian Man was a joint winner in a competition for First Chapters. You may read it online until December 1st here. Second, he published Dancing About Architecture: A Songwriter’s Guide to the Lennon-McCartney Catalog, which runs through the 162 songs by Lennon and McCartney, tracing the song fingerprints of each songwriter. Most interesting, perhaps, is the origin of “Yesterday,” the only song for which Paul requested sole credit, saying it had blossomed full-blown when he woke from a night’s sleep and no one had anything to do with it but himself. Yoko Ono denied the request, but for the wrong reason. John’s influence on the song is undeniable, the book makes it clear, but Yoko doesn’t know what it is, and Paul McCartney himself may just be amazed. boman@core.com

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be speaking at the Maine College of Art in Portland at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 6, in Osher Hall. Topic: Outsider Artists and the Strange Case of Richard Dadd. On Tuesday, November 12, she’ll speak at the Belfast Free Library, Belfast, Maine, at 6:30 p.m. Topic: Guided by Voices: Reading Aloud and Characterization.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is appearing at the World Fantasy Convention in Brighton, England, through November 3rd. She’s teaching “Romancing YA” for the Romance Writers of America University, November 4-8. She’ll appear at YALLFest in Charleston, SC, on November 9th and at Atomacon on November 10th. She’ll be doing a reading with James P. Blaylock at Whittier College on November 19, courtesy of fellow Stonecoast faculty member Tony Barnstone (poetry), and she’s tentatively scheduled for Long Beach Comic & Horror Con November 23-24.

Barbara Hurd‘s (Creative Nonfiction) essay “Keys” is one of thirteen essays now short-listed for a major award in Great Britain: the William Hazlitt Prize, which honors “the best essay in the English language, published or unpublished, on any subject.” She was also first runner-up for the Prairie Schooner Creative Nonfiction Contest and a finalist for the 2013 Annie Dillard Award. Those essays will be published in Prairie Schooner and in the Bellingham Review in the spring. All three essays are part of her forthcoming collection Putting an Ear to the Ground.

cov1311lg-250Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) has had two new stories published. The first, titled “The Promise of Space,” was in the September issue of Clarkesworld. In addition to the print version, there is an audio version which features Jim and Clarkesworld‘s Podcast Director Kate Baker doing the readings. “The Promise of Space” is a story told entirely in dialog; a theatrical version will debut in March 2014 as part of the New Hampshire Theatre Project’s Intelligent Theatre Festival in Portsmouth, NH. The second story, “Sing, Pilgrim,” is a flash piece in the November/December issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. The first draft of this story was written at a Stonecoast residency, during one of Jim’s (infamous) flash fiction challenges. Jim has also sold a new story to the online magazine Lightspeed; “Miss Nobody Never Was” will be published in the December issue. Also, Jim will be reading with Mercurio D. Rivera on November 20th at 7:00 p.m. at the KGB Bar (85 East 4th Street just off 2nd Avenue, upstairs) in New York City. The reading will be the latest in the “Fantastic Fiction at KGB” monthly reading series, which began in the late ’90s. Fantastic Fiction is held on the third Wednesday of every month at the famous KGB Bar. Admission is free.

Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is directing the play Red, which will run three weekends, November 1-17, at The Actors Studio of Newburyport, MA. Red, by playwright/screenwriter/director John Logan is the story of abstract-expressionist Mark Rothko, holed up in his New York Studio in 1958-9, painting a group of murals for the exclusive Four Seasons restaurant. He gives orders to his assistant, Ken, as he mixes the paints, makes the frames, and paints the canvases. Ken, however, brashly questions Rothko’s theories of art and his acceding to work on such a commercial project. In 2010 the play won six Tony awards, including Best Play. The Actors Studio is located in The Tannery, 50 Water Street, Mill #1, Suite 5, Newburyport, MA. For reservations, call 978.465.1299 or visit the website.

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Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has a personal essay in a new anthology from Norton: Knitting  Yarns, edited by former Stonecoast faculty Ann Hood and featuring fellow faculty Suzanne Strempek Shea along with writers such as Barbara Kingsolver, Anita Shreve, Andre Dubus III, Elinor Lipman, Ann Patchett, and Jane Smiley. Elizabeth and Suzanne will read from the anthology along with Ann Hood and others at Newtonville Books on November 14; Elizabeth will read from the anthology with others in Wellesley, MA, on November 21 at Wellesley Books. Elizabeth will also be reading “bedtime stories” from her fiction along with Suzanne at a “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun Pajama Party” event sponsored by the Republican Newspaper in Springfield, MA, on November 15 at Delaney House. The event is featured in an article in The Republican and on Mass.Live. Elizabeth is also reading and partying on November 2nd at the Stonecoast Northeast event Lost Lit presents Stonecoast MFA in NYC, hosted by Stonecoast student Kristabelle Munson and featuring Stonecoast students and alumni. The reading is 7:00-8:00 p.m. at Grumpy Bert, 82 Bond Street in Brooklyn. Seating is limited, so RSVP for this event with lynne@lostlit.com.

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