Tag Archives: Mary Heather Noble

Community News & Updates November 2016

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to have been part of the “Fantasy of the American Heartland” (with Rob Howell, Lynne Cantwell, Gary K. Wolfe, and Stephanie Loree) and “Shirley at 100: Marking the Shirley Jackson Centennial” (with Eileen Gunn, Peter Straub, Gordon Van Gelder, and Stephanie Feldman) panels at the World Fantasy Convention October 27-30. Her flash undead-grandmother-farm-guardian story “On Rising One Snowy Evening” will be reprinted in a forthcoming issue of Cosmic Roots and Eldritch Shores. Karen’s new poem “Broken Tractor Sonnet,” which contains some mighty shocking language for a midwestern farm girl, will appear in Off the Coast: Maine’s International Poetry Journals Fall 2016 issue. Her Japanese theater alien possession micro story “The Things Between Us” will appear in Daily Nightmare’s Quick Shivers in the Midwest anthology. Also, audio of Karen reading her poem “Effects of Moonlight” is up on the child-safe Science Fiction Poetry Association’s 2016 Halloween Poetry Reading website.

uncanny_issue_thirteen_coverJennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has published her story “Kamanti’s Child” along with an interview in the November/December issue of Uncanny Magazine. Also our own Theodora Goss has a poem in this issue as well!

Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) debut novel The Big Rewind (William Morrow, February 2016) was long-listed for the Kirkus Prize. The original starred review called it “A mystery that will inspire more than one playlist and, hopefully, a sequel.”

the-butchers-daughterFlorence Grende‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) book, The Butcher’s Daughter: A Memoir, has just been released by Hamilton Stone Editions and is available through their catalogue at Hamiltonstone.org., at Amazon.com, and at Goodreads.com. A family portrait drawn in lyrical style, it examines the effects of war and its aftermath.

In his capacity as a screenwriter and television producer, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) received a pilot script order from the Independent Film Channel, a dark comedy about family relationships and the afterlife entitled Get Your Shit Together. IFC is one of the AMC (Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead) family of channels and currently broadcasts Portlandia and the documentary parody series Documentary Now! from Seth Myers, starring Bill Hader and Fred Armisen.

on-hurricane-islandEllen Meeropol’s (Fiction, W ’06) second novel, On Hurricane Island, was named a Massachusetts Must Read Book for 2016 by the Massachusetts Center for the Book.

John Christopher Nelson‘s, (Fiction, S’15) short story “Good Friday,” conceived during his residency in Ireland with the Deppes, will be featured in issue VI (summer 2017) of The New Guard. His flash fiction piece “Detumescence” is currently online in issue II of The Matador Review.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her essay “Eulogy for an Owl” won the Editor’s Prize in Creative Nonfiction’s Learning From Nature Issue (Issue #61, available now here). “Eulogy for an Owl” was also selected as a finalist in Bellingham Review’s 2016 Annie Dillard Award for Creative Nonfiction. Mary Heather is also looking forward to presenting at the Moravian College Writers’ Conference on February 3-4, 2017, in which she will discuss “Crossing Boundaries in Nonfiction,” her evolution from a professional environmental scientist into a writer-scientist, and how science and art can enrich one another. Additional information about the 2017 Moravian College Writers’ Conference, featuring Alison Hawthorne Deming as the Keynote Speaker, can be found here.

Jean M. Peck (Fiction, S’08) will be reading from her new book, Blue Girls, on November 15, 7:00 p.m., at Longfellow Books in Portland. The novel was written as a senior thesis at Stonecoast under the watchful eyes of Lesléa Newman, David Anthony Durham, and Suzanne Strempek Shea.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonficiton, S’08) recent guest post at the Brevity blog discussed the steps she took in the writing process to break into Brevity Magazine with an essay in their Fall 2016 special issue on race. A new hat Lisa is wearing now is editing nonfiction craft essays for Cleaver Magazine.

Ashley Warren‘s (Fiction, S’12) short story “Code Gray” has been published in the latest issue of The Examine Life Journal, a literary journal of the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.

Requiem in StonesRequiem in Stones, a novel by Richard Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05) has just been published by Maine Authors Publishing Cooperative and is available in local book stores, through Amazon, or by going to http://richardwile.com. Brunswick’s Gulf of Maine Book Store will host a launch and reading on Sunday, December 4, at 3:00 p.m. You might also want to check out Rick’s blog. http://geriatricpilgrim.com

FACULTY

An interview with Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction), conducted at Politics & Prose bookstore, is available here.

we-got-himElizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) new novel, We Got Him, will be released by New Rivers Press on November 15th; Elizabeth will have her Book Launch reading and party (all Stonecoasters are invited!) at Newtonville Books in Newton Centre, MA, on November 20th at 2:00 p.m. Then, a week later, Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera opens in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, with Previews November 26 and 27 and Opening Night November 29th. Elizabeth will be at all the November performances; for tickets see Theater Wit.

Soap bubbles are on the horizon! Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) learned this past week that Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune Tomorrow, As the World Turns Restlessly by the Guiding Light of Our Lives, will be published in March of 2017 by McFarland Press. They will be planning readings in New England and beyond this spring, and they hope to meet up and read along with many of the writers and soap insiders who penned stories about their own soap-opera fixations.

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates July 2016

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Cover art Time TrainEric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W’12) is thrilled to announce the release of his novel, The Time Train. He is doing a book signing at Longfellow Books in Portland, Maine, on July 12th at 7:00 p.m.

ds16Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is pleased to announce a new issue of Escape Artist’s Mothership Zeta Magazine (#4) will publish in July featuring nonfiction articles from Stonecoast alumni Sean Robinson and Adam Gallardo, as well as an article by herself and Stonecoast faculty James Patrick Kelly—Karen serves as the Nonfiction Assistant Editor under Editor in Chief (and alumna) Mur Lafferty. Furthermore, Karen is thrilled to announce her new poem “Syncing Minefields” will appear in a forthcoming issue of Strange Horizons Magazine and her narration of Krystal Claxton’s story “Heartless” is now available for listening at District of Wonders Network’s Far Fetched Fables Podcast. Karen’s short poem “What Dolls Eat” (originally published at The Were-Traveler) has been nominated for a Dwarf Stars award and appears in the Science Fiction Poetry Association’s Dwarf Stars 2016: The Best Very Short Speculative Poems Published in 2015 anthology. The biggest (and scariest) news is that Karen’s first novel will be coming out first quarter 2017—but she tries not to jinx it by talking about it too much. She’s currently neck deep in edits with a July 30 deadline, and continues to be grateful for her Stonecoast experiences every day.

Libby Cudmore (Popular Fiction/Creative Nonfiction, S’10) and Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) have joined the faculty of Western Connecticut State University’s Low-Residency MFA Program. In addition, both Libby and Matthew have contributed stories to the upcoming adoption-themed YA anthology Welcome Home (Jolly Fish Press), which is slated for release in Fall of 2017.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S‘07) is now a contributor at The New Yorker website. You can read his work here and here. His next book, One Nation Under Baseball, will be published by University of Nebraska Press in Spring 2017.

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) has had the following short stories published: “Dumbass” in Massachusetts Review (Winter issue of 2016), “Go Out Like Sunday” in Louisville Review (Spring edition 2016), “Hopeless” in Halfway Down the Stairs, “Charms” in Marathon Literary Review, and “Dancing with Daddy” in Fiction Fix (Summer of 2016 issue). She has also had two poems accepted for publication in the Spring 2016 issue of The Binnacle, “Grackles” and “Again.” Her work has appeared in numerous other literary publications. She has also recently retired from teaching full time at a magnet arts high school in Willimantic, CT, to work on her novel. She writes using the pen name B. P. Greenbaum

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thefourthpiececoverEboni Ardell Harris‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08; pen name E. Ardell) first YA Science Fiction/Fantasy novel The Fourth Piece, published by 48fourteen, comes out in all formats on July 8, 2016. Read more about it here.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to report that her essay “Eulogy for an Owl” was selected as a Finalist in The Bellingham Review’s 2016 Annie Dillard Award for Creative Nonfiction. Her flash piece “Things I (Shouldn’t) Have to Tell My Daughters” was also recently featured in The Fem.

Carolyn O’Doherty (Popular Fiction, W’11) has accepted a two-book deal with Boyds Mills Press for her young adult novel Rewind and a to-be-determined follow up.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is pleased that in June, Purple Clover featured her nonfiction narrative “A Father, A Road Trip, the Polyester Mafia” (or, as the click-aware editors there dubbed it, “Goodfella: I liked being the rich kid whose father may or may not have been in the mafia”). At Cleaver Magazine, a short piece of nonfiction appeared: “Break a Leg” (no connection to the Mafia theme!); while Fifty is the New Fifty published “Not Enough Ways to Remember a Dad.” Finally, at the Submittable Blog, her guest post, “Want to Know How Lit Journal Editors Think? What One Issue’s Accepted Work Can Tell You,” is now live.

Romeo - pic # 2 - Lisa, Cathy, parents at hotel

Konza: A Bioregional Journal on Living in Place will publish Olive L. Sullivan‘s (Fiction/Cross Genre, S’15) essay “Romeo at Pin Oak” in the July issue. The journal is a project of the Kansas Area Watershed Council and is headed by former Kansas poet laureate Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jennifer Castello (Popular Fiction) has been chosen by the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts for an artist residency this November.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be helping to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of BOA Editions when she reads with four other BOA poets in the Bryant Park Reading Series on Tuesday, July 5th. The reading will be held in the outdoor Bryant Park Reading Room off 42nd Street behind the New York Public Library in Manhattan and will begin at 7:00 p.m. It’s free, and it would be great to see some Stonecoasters there!

Theodora Goss‘s (Popular Fiction) modern fairy tale, “Red as Blood and White as Bone,” was published on Tor.com. Her story “Beautiful Boys” is a finalist for the Seiun Award (in Japanese translation). In July, she will be an author guest at Readercon, in Quincy, MA.

ComicConNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will appear at San Diego Comic-Con International. On Friday, July 22 from noon to 1:00 p.m., she will sign Scales and Tales: Finding Forever Homes, a charity anthology, and at 6:00 p.m. she will appear at the International Association of Media Tie-in Writers Scribe Awards ceremony and panel discussion (she is a nominee for Best Adapted Novel for Crimson Peak).

We Got Him-1In the forthcoming summer issue of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an excerpt from her new novel, We Got Him, which will be published by New Rivers Press in November 2016.

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Community News & Updates June 2016

ALUMS

2016 AOE winner - ParanormalPatricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W’12) is thrilled to announce that her paranormal historical romance, Moon Dark, Book One of The Auriano Curse series, won the Colorado Romance Writers’ Award of Excellence. The book, originally available only as an ebook, is now also available as a trade paperback.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is happy to share that Catwalk (Midnight Ink, 2014) has been awarded a Certificate of Excellence and is now a finalist in the Cat Writers’ Association’s international writing contest (winners to be announced in June). Catwalk, the third book in her Animals in Focus mystery series, won the 2015 Maxwell Award for fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America.

Lightspeed_73_June_2016Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) will have a flash fiction story, “Breathe Deep, Breathe Free,” published in a special edition of Lightspeed Magazine called People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction.

The Hanzai Japan anthology (Haikasoru, editors Nick Mamatas & Masumi Washington) was named as a finalist for a Locus award in the Anthology category. The anthology of futuristic Japanese crime fiction features Libby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction, S’10) short story “Rough Night in Little Toke,” which was hailed as a “polished gem” by The Japan Times.

Paul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) published the first of several short stories in the setting of Obsidian Entertainment’s upcoming game, Tyranny. The first—“Under New Management”—introduces one of game’s major factions: the Scarlet Chorus. The story can be found at this link, and more are forthcoming.

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Andrea Lani (Fiction, W14) was pleased that her essay “Love Bugs,” about dead bugs and affection, appeared on Mothers Always Write in May.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to report publication of her environmental essay on the recent drinking water crises in Quartz, as well as publication of her flash piece, entitled “Things I (Shouldn’t) Have to Tell My Daughters,” forthcoming in The Fem. Mary Heather is looking forward to a teaching apprenticeship at the summer Stonecoast residency in July, and has been accepted to the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference in Ripton, Vermont.

Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) won the Vine Leaves Press Vignette Collection award; they will be publishing her first book—a collection of lyric essays—Not A Place On Any Map on December 5th, 2016. Read more here.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) has new work forthcoming in Harpur Palate, Hippocampus, and Cleaver. Meanwhile, an essay about her skeptical stance on Mother’s Day appeared on RoleReboot, and some flash nonfiction, “Searching for Silvio,” about an odd mission undertaken in the name of grief, fatherly love, and annoying relatives, appeared in Litbreak. Her essay about postpartum depression from Fall 2015, for Brain Child, is now recommended reading by the New Jersey Council on Mental Health Stigma.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) is happy to announce her novel, In the Context of Loveis a 2016 Eric Hoffer Category Finalist. The Hoffer Awards honor the memory of American philosopher Eric Hoffer by “highlighting salient books, as well as the spirit of independent presses.” Linda’s novel is also earned an Honorable Mention in the 2016 Great Midwest Book Festival.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Barking Dog Nocturnal” won second prize in Selected Shorts/Electric Lit‘s 2016 Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize, judged by T.C. Boyle. She has also been named a finalist in the The Doctor T. J. Eckleburg Review Gertrude Stein Award in Fiction 2015.

Marco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has a lyric essay, “Shepherd’s Purse,” in Kenyon Review‘s May/June “Nature’s Nature” issue.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching at the Yale Writers Workshop June 15-19. Her novel Wylding Hall has just been nominated for the Shirley Jackson and the Locus Awards, and NPR reviewed her Cass Neary novels in its Time Machine book feature. Hand’s most recent book review was Stephen King’s End of Watch for The Washington Post.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has two books out on June 28th: the paperback edition of her young adult thriller, The Rules, and Ghostbusters: The Official Movie Novelization. She will be participating in a signing at the Teen Book Festival at the Oceanside, California, Barnes and Noble on June 12 at 1:00 p.m.

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In May Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) 600,000-word career retrospective collection, entitled Masters of Science Fiction: James Patrick Kelly, was finally published in a signed limited edition of 500 aimed primarily for collectors. Two weeks later Centipede Press, the publisher, sold out its entire stock, although intrepid buyers may be able to track down one of the remaining scatter of copies online.

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Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) film script based on her novel A Four-Sided Bed was produced as a Staged Reading in Hollywood, starring TV/Film actors Evan Ross (The Hunger Games), Lucy Griffiths (True Blood, Preacher), Gia Mantegna (Under the Dome) and Kenny Leu (NCIS; Independence Day: Resurgence), performed at Zephyr Theater in Los Angeles on May 19th. The performance was produced by Amy Carpenter Scott/Creatrix Films as part of the ongoing project to develop A Four-Sided Bed as a feature film. Elizabeth is also working on a theater version of the ‘menage a trois love story’ script.  Stay tuned!

Elizabeth with stars Kenny Leu and Lucy Griffiths in Hollywood at Zephyr Theater

Elizabeth with stars Kenny Leu and Lucy Griffiths in Hollywood at Zephyr Theater

 

 

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Community News & Updates February 2016

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Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is ecstatic to announce she has signed a contract with a small press for her 26k word novella “Swift for the Sun” (historical pirate adventure/romance) which will be released under a pseudonym in the first quarter of 2017. It’s the biggest advance and largest royalties percentage she’s ever signed for and she’s very excited. Furthermore, Karen’s poem “NeverNever Holes,” originally published on Zingara Poet, will be reprinted in a forthcoming Love Poems anthology edited by Johnny M. Tucker, Jr. Also, the second issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring nonfiction by Stonecoast alumnus Adam Gallardo and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction, for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

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Space Heart,” an essay by Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11), appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of Solstice Literary Magazine. Her poem “Flowering” was re-published in A Year of Being Here. In February, she will be an Associate Artist under writer David Shields at the residency program of the Atlantic Center for the Arts. From there, she will go to Foundation Obras in Portugal for a three-week residency.

Isthmus-issue-4-e1452206003965Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “Holes in Heaven”—a story that concerns itself with sibling rivalry, stellar nurseries, and exiled children—can be found in the print journal Isthmus; an excerpt is available online. Issue 21 of the Small Beer podcast also came out in January and features Julie’s narration of Mary Rickert’s story “Cold Fires.”

Nikki Flionis (Fiction, ’10) is among many long-time Bostonians reflecting on their lives in Streets of Echoes, the latest volume in the City of Boston’s memoir project series. Developed in collaboration with Grubstreet, this volume includes residents of Back Bay, Fenway, Beacon Hill-West End, and Dorchester. Flionis’ essay, “Rooms with Adieu,” focuses on the old rooming house culture, wiped out with stunning speed by the advent of the residential condominium in the 1980’s.

_6757124Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Maine author and former Pushcart winner Jennifer Lunden in December 2015. And 2016 is off to a grand start: Penny’s book Postcards from Here is now available for order.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry/Artistic Collaboration, W’08) was awarded the first Oregon Literary Fellowship for Writers of Color in 2016. Her debut poetry collection, the small claim of bones, placed second in the 2015 International Latino Book Awards, and she was selected by Poets & Writers Magazine as a 2014 Notable Debut Poet.

Joe M McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) short story “Snowbird” appears in the March 2016 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to have her essay “Seduction” included in Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, an anthology to be released by Ice Cube Press later this month. Fracture explores the well-known and little-known complexities of fracking through first-hand experience, investigative journalism, storytelling, and verse. The collection will also feature the work of Stonecoast faculty Debra Marquart, former Stonecoast faculty Barbara Hurd, and several other acclaimed environmental writers. The book can be pre-ordered here.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) essay “Sound and Fury, Signifying” appeared in Synaesthesia Magazine in January. Another CNF piece, “​Gray,” received honorable mention in the 2015​ Our Past Loves contest and 9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webis now posted online (scroll down). ​Lisa has ​been invited to present a craft seminar at HippoCamp 2016​: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA, in August​. ​Conference registration is now open.​ Lisa’s humor essay, “The Long Pink Line,” has been accepted for Flash Nonfiction Funny.

Anne K. Ross’s (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) book Beyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be published on April 5, 2016, by Leatherback Press.

Tripping Back Blue coverKara Storti‘s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Tripping Back Blue, will be released on April 1st by CarolRhoda Lab, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about Finn, a 17-year-old full of paradoxes. He’s a drug dealer, but he’s scoring money to send his twin sister to Harvard. He’s desperate to shoot up even though he’s the most popular kid in Dammertown. He’s a philosopher and orator who’s failing all his classes. The only time he finds peace is when he’s bird-watching. Finn’s life begins to spiral out of control, until he discovers a miracle drug called indigo. Finn is convinced that the drug is the way out of everything broken in his life. But is it really as magical as it seems?

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) stories “Feeding the Skeleton Cats” and “Tornado Season” appeared in Eleven ElevenHer story “The Damaged,” originally published in Interzone, appeared on the podcast StarShipSofa. “Skeletons,” originally in Room, was reprinted on the LGBTQ podcast Glittership.

Olive Sullivan (Fiction/Cross-Genre Poetry, S’15) is the editor of a new fine arts magazine produced by students in the Department of Communication at Missouri Southern State University, where Sullivan is an assistant professor. The magazine, Vivid, hosted a launch party January 22nd in downtown Joplin. The website is www.vividfinearts.com. Here is a link to a TV news feature about the launch.

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grimmdj-front-finalBoskone 53, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, will feature among their program participants Stonecoast faculty James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss as well as alumnae Julie C. Day and Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09). This year Erin Underwood is serving as Program Head for Boskone, and she was recently appointed as Chair for next year’s convention. Join us in Boston, MA from February 19-21, 2016, and visit the Boskone website for membership information. The Grimm Future, edited by popular fiction alumna Erin Underwood, will be released in February 2016 by NESFA Press and will be featured as this year’s Boskone book. The Grimm Future is a new science fiction anthology of reimagined Grimm fairy tales that features original fiction by 14 of today’s most exciting authors including Stonecoast faculty member Nancy Holder and alumna Sandra McDonald.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) marks a return to songwriting with a new record deal and a new album! Preacher Boy – The National Blues is now available direct from Altco Recordings, or on iTunes and other digital music services

An Unfinished Story about Eagles,” by Rick Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05), appears in the latest edition of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. His blog, The Geriatric Pilgrim, now comes out twice a month.

FACULTY

kanth3Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) review of Garth Greenwell’s novel What Belongs to You appeared in the New York Times Book Review.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new story titled “Whatever Kills in Vegas” in Kolchak: Passages of the Macabre, published by Moonstone Books.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem “Lament” has been selected by guest editor, Edward Hirsch, for inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology. The poem, “Lament,” a section of a long poem in Marquart’s recent collection, Small Buried Things, addresses the ravages of best-american-poetry-2016-9781501127557_lgfracking in her home state of North Dakota. The poem was originally published by New Letters in 2014. The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology will be published by Scribner in September 2016.

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

By request of the editors, Lisa Romeo S’08 would like to pass along this opportunity:​  Flash Nonfiction Funny, a planned collection of humorous short-short nonfiction pieces. Editors Tom Hazuka and Dinty W. Moore are soliciting submissions, 750 words maximum; both unpublished and previously published selections are welcome. Email submissions as Microsoft Word documents to either tom@tomhazuka.com or moored4@ohio.edu (not both, please).

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Community News & Updates June 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) drabble about an unfortunate house cat entitled “What Dolls Eat” will appear in The Were-Traveler in late May/early June. She is most pleased the editor called it “damn creepy” in her acceptance letter.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) published a short story “A Song For You” on Motherboard themed from the Donny Hathaway song of the same name and the myth of Orpheus. Her novel Elysium has been placed on the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Honor List and is a Finalist for the Locus Award for Best First Novel.

808_largeJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Re’em Song” is now available in issue 258 of Interzone. Turns out so is Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Doors.” This is almost more fun than one Stonecoast writer can handle—thankfully there are two of them to handle the load.

Hank Garfield (Fiction, S’04) will present a paper entitled “Madmen on the Water: The Golden Globe Singlehanded Sailboat Race of 1968-69 and Robert Stone’s Outerbridge Reach at the annual Sport Literature Association conference June 28 in Johnson City, Tennessee. See Hank’s blog, Slower Traffic, on walking, bicycling and not owning a car, at slowertraffic.net.

Bone SongBunny Goodjohn‘s (Poetry, W’07) first poetry collection, Bone Song, launches at the downtown YWCA in Lynchburg on June 18th at 7:15 p.m. Bone Song won the 2014 Liam Rector Prize and includes a jacket blurb from the rather fabulous Baron Wormser. The collection is available at Amazon; however, signed copies with free positive energy may be ordered from Bunny’s Etsy store.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is proud to announce that her first book, a collection of micro-essays called Postcards from Here, will be released by Vine Leaves Press in 2016. Some pieces from the book have been previously published, and curious people can read online excerpts here and here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Short Nonfiction for her lyric essay “Saudade,” which was first published in The Stonecoast Review. She thanks Review editors Alexandria DelCourt, Alexis Paige, and others for helping to improve the piece. A shorter version was published this month in Hippocampus Magazine and is available here. Earlier this month, Lesley had a review/essay inspired by Los Angeles writer Wendy C. Ortiz’s second memoir, Hollywood Notebook, up on The Rumpus.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a book trailer for his debut poetry collection, Drift.

The High Cost of Flowers by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) won the best literary fiction award and the best contemporary fiction award in the 2014 Midwest Book Awards held April 13. This was the 25th anniversary of the awards with books submitted by independent, small, and academic presses in a twelve-state region. The High Cost of Flowers was released by Calumet Editions.

0615asimovs_smWill Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11) appears in the July 2015 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction with “Acres of Perhaps.”

Mary Heather Noble‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) essay “Reintroduction” is featured in Issue 7: Wilderness of Minerva Rising. She will be participating in the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, this month, and will be working with acclaimed environmental writer Scott Russell Sanders. Mary Heather has also been invited as a writer-in-residence for PLAYA’s “Beyond Creating: A Climate of Change,” an Art + Ecology themed artist retreat that fosters collaboration among artists and scientists around environmental issues. PLAYA is a nonprofit organization based in Summer Lake, Oregon, that supports innovative thinking through work in the arts, literature, natural sciences and other fields of creative inquiry.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction (New Rivers Press)—an annual anthology of the best new fiction from established and emerging writers, edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04)—has just been awarded the Midwest Independent Publishers Association award for Fiction: Short Story/Anthology, the first time an anthology has won the top prize. Former Stonecoast Director Lee Hope is one of the authors in the anthology, and founding faculty member Michael C White was the finalist and prize-awarding judge. He read the submissions blind. Submissions for the 2016 are being accepted through Submittable. Details are available at the New Rivers Press web site.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essay “Your Boyfriend’s Back” appears in the May issue of Front Porch. Lisa will present at HippoCamp 15, Hippocampus Magazine’s creative nonfiction conference in August. A preview of her session is at their blog.

Kara L. Storti’s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Indigo in D-Town, will be released in Spring 2016 by CarolRhoda Lab, a division of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about charming but tortured Phineas “Finn” Walt, a seventeen-year-old drug dealer who develops an unexpected friendship with an 80-year-old addict. Together they harvest and deal an unknown drug that transports the user to a favorite memory after which a “souvenir” appears from the past. The drug “hippo” is miraculous, highly addictive, and threatens to ruin Finn’s life by dredging up horrific childhood memories, tumbling him further into heroin abuse, and involving a psychopathic drug king out for blood.

51K-wdh5TxL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) is honored to have her essay “An Internship at New Rivers Press” included in the 50th Anniversary publication of New Rivers Press titled Paper Camera. This edition is published as a celebration of the enduring quality of the small press in the face of an ever-increasing pressure by other modes of publication in the writing world. The contents are intended to highlight the dynamic range of material considered by New Rivers Press as noteworthy of finding its way into print.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) is the winner of the New Works Competition at Hugo House for a flash fiction story, “Mosaic.” She will read alongside Meg Wolitzer, Justin Torres, and Amelia Gray in Seattle the end of May. Growing a New Tail, Lisa’s debut collection of short fiction, will launch late summer 2015 and in September in Dublin and Galway. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press.

Julie L. Vandekreke‘s (formerly Scharf; Creative Nonfiction, S’10) poem “Transparent” is forthcoming in the June 2015 edition of Mused: Bella Online Literary Review.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her full-length poetry manuscript, Pierce & Brand’s World of Dangerous Wonders, is currently a semifinalist in the 2015 Negative Capability Press Book Competition. In addition, her chapbook manuscript, Imperative, is currently a semifinalist in YesYes Books’ 2015 Vinyl 45s Chapbook Contest.

2015 Negative Capability Press Book CompetitionMarco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has two new pieces out.  His essay, “A House of Swing Doors: This Future Life (Calvatea gigantea)” on mushrooms and mortality, which began and greatly profited from being in a Stonecoast workshop, is in the May issue of DIAGRAM. His piece “Some Rules for Foraging” will appear in the summer issue of Taproot. Marco was also a finalist for the Sumer Literary Seminar Disquiet program in Lisbon and will be participating in the program this summer.

FACULTY

Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) will be telling a story for The Moth, on May 30th, at a sold-out show at Portland’s State Theater. The episode will be broadcast nationally on NPR. His story will be about the brief and wondrous life of Poppins, the cat.

Portuguese The Sacred Band V2The final volume of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) Acacia series comes out this month in Portugal. It’s called Acácia – Vozes da Profecia, and is the sixth book in the series, as the publisher, Saída de Emergência, divided each book into two volumes.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” will be published in the fall issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) recent reviews include The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings, in the Los Angeles Times, and Stephen King’s Finders Keepers for the Washington Post.

Labor Poetic Labor! 2Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has a new poem available on-line at Essay Press in the second volume of Labor Poetic Labor!. Stephen Motika (Poetry) has written an afterword to this issue.

The New York City premiere of Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera—now has tickets on sale. It will be produced this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with dates now announced and tickets available June 1st for NYMF pass holders and June 15th for the general public. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera will be performed on June 25 at two showcase events: a NYMF Preview at the World Wide Plaza, West 50th and 8th Ave in NYC, 12:00-2:15 p.m. and also a showcase in the Broadway Sessions series at the Laurie Beechman Theater, 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. In addition, there will be a Songwriters’ Showcase for Elizabeth in NYC later in July, details TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but will be at Stonecoast in spirit and hopes to see Stonecoast alums at Rinkside. Check out the coverage in Backstage and Theater Mania. For more info and updates on performances and tickets, visit the show’s website.

Tonya & Nancy The Rock Opera NYMF Logo Hi Res

Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, will feature Stonecoast grad Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) at its eighth annual “Are you a Bookie?” gathering of book clubs and book lovers, June 14, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Admission is free of charge and cake will be served. Elli will be reading from On Hurricane Island, her new novel. Several Stonecoasters are featured in the anthology that will be read from by panelist Nina Gaby, editor of Dumped. The event will include Karen Shepard as keynote speaker. She is the author of The Celestials, an historical novel inspired by the true story of 75 Chinese laborers brought to North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1870 to break a strike at a shoe factory. Emcee will be Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), the university’s writer in residence and director of its writing program. All authors’ books will be available for sale and signing.

CONFERENCES

DSC_5904There is still space for writers to enroll at Iota: Short Prose Conference! Started by alum Penny Guisinger as a third semester project, Iota is now in its third year of offering high-quality writing instruction in short fiction, essays, prose poems, and all things flash and micro. You define “short”—it’s anything shorter than “long.” This year’s dates are July 23-26, and faculty are Richard Hoffman and Sarah Einstein. Come spend a long weekend writing short forms in Downeast Maine!

charles and sue-iotaCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Interested in writing for the Stonecoast Community blog? We’re looking for all types of essays from alumni, students, and faculty about creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, film, writing, MFAs, post-MFA, interviews, etc. Please contact Robert E. Stutts if you have something you’d like to share.

 

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Community News & Updates January 2015

Happy New Year!

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) had a lovely December. Her essay “A Question of Corvids,” winner of the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Creative Nonfiction Award, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for the Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology. Her novel The Money Bird (Midnight Ink, 2013) is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for Fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. And her poem “On Eating My Way Through a Feast of Poems” appeared in Minerva Rising, Issue 6: Food. That poem began as an “evaluation” of a class on using food in writing taught by Cait Johnson, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, and Aaron Hamburger at the summer 2012 residency—you never know where the seeds will be planted!

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) had two stories published by on-line journals in November: (1) “Honor Thy Wife” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and published in Crabfat Literary Magazine. (2) He was the featured fiction writer in Mud Season Review and the story, “Making Weight,” can be viewed here.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the December issue of the online magazine Luna Station Quarterly.

The Fragile World final front coverPaula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) second novel, The Fragile World, was published on October 28 by Harlequin MIRA. She was recently a guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss the book. Her first novel The Mourning Hours (June 2013) was a recent finalist for the Housatonic Book Award (info here). Paula would like to give continued thanks to Ted Deppe, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Boman Desai, who mentored her through early drafts of that book. A third novel is scheduled for publication in 2016. More information can be found on her website or on Facebook.

ZombifiedAdam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) book, Zombified, will be available from Kensington books in stores and online later this month. As a promotion for the book’s release, Kensington will also be offering the e-version of his first book, Zomburbia, for just $2.99 across all platforms.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two CNF pieces published last month: an untitled essay about a tree, an owl, and a growing boy in the “A Place in Mind” section of the Winter 2014 issue of Northern Woodlands and  “Four Days at Russell Pond,” an account of her family’s first backpacking trip, in issue 19 of TrailGroove. She also read an abridged version of her recently published essay, “Here Be Dragons,” at November’s Local Writers at the Local Buzz event in Cape Elizabeth, ME, alongside novelist Maria Padian and poet Christian Barter.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her book manuscript, Plumes: On Contamination of Home and Habitat, was selected by Karen Joy Fowler as the winner of the 2014 Siskiyou Prize in New Environmental Literature. The Siskiyou Prize, sponsored by Ashland Creek Press, honors literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife.  Winners receive a cash prize, an offer of publication from Ashland Creek Press, and a four-week residency at PLAYA near Summer Lake in the Oregon Outback. Plumes was Mary Heather’s Stonecoast thesis.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, has been acquired by Bedazzled Ink Publishing Company for their B Ink imprint and will be published in summer 2015. That’s two different books next year, for the 10th anniversary of her Stonecoast graduation!

In September, Passages North ran Alexis Paige’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) Stonecoast graduation speech, and later that month she joined Brevity Magazine as assistant editor.

Catherine Schmitt‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) essay “The Coyote Gangs of Hope” is in the current issue of 1966: A Journal of Creative Nonfiction. This piece was improved with the help of Rick Bass and participants in the Summer 2011 nonfiction workshop.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) is the head of programming for Boskone 52, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, which takes place in Boston from February 13-15, 2015. There will be a panel titled “Writers on Writing: Talking Plot with Stonecoast MFA Faculty,” featuring faculty members David Anthony Durham, Theodora Goss, Elizabeth Hand, and James Patrick Kelly—moderated by alumna Allison Hartman Adams. Stonecoast faculty and alumni will also be participating in a variety of other panels, readings, and discussions. Boskone is free to the public on Friday the 13th from 2:00-6:00 p.m., and attending memberships are required after 6:00 p.m. on Friday as well as for the duration of the convention. More information about the convention, programming, and weekend/one-day memberships can be found at www.boskone.org

boskone-52-image

CWIsTypingChristopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) new column, “The Bottle & the Pen: An Exploration through Wine and Literature,” debuted on GrapeCollective on December 26, 2014. You can find the column here.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) book Letters from Limbo has been accepted for publication by CavanKerry Press.

Stonecoasters who wish to meet or reconnect with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will be interested in two Western Massachusetts appearances next month at Bay Path University, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. Ted and Annie will give a reading open to the public free of charge Thursday, February 12, at 7:00 p.m. at Bay Path University. On Saturday, February 14, at Bay Path’s Writers’ Day, Ted Deppe will give a talk on Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous. He will be joined by speakers Charles Coe, on Writing About Those Close to You: The Joys and the Terrors; Bruce DeSilva, on Writing Crime; Penny Guisinger, on Grant Writing; Nell Lake, on How I Went Deep: Writing Intimate Stories About Other People; and Roland Merullo, on The Demons of the Blank Page. For information on registration and fees for Writers’ Day, please write Briana Sitler, at bsiter@baypath.edu

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has completed his long-delayed historical novel about the Spartacus slave rebellion. It’s off to his publisher, Doubleday, for publication sometime in 2016. Also, Redwave Films has renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story for the twelfth year. The producer, Uberto Pasolini, and director, Alan Taylor, seem more confident than ever that this is the year they’ll be able to move the project forward.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has been been named the new vice president of the Horror Writers Association following the death of president Rocky Wood. She has also been invited to the annual Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock Holmes birthday dinner in New York City, which takes place during the first half of the Stonecoast winter residency. She will be signing In the Company of Sherlock Holmes with her NYT bestselling, Edgar-Award-winning editors Leslie Klinger and Laurie King, as well as Pulitzer-Prize winner Michael Dirda. She is also a Juror for the Shirley Jackson Awards and encourages published horror writers to consider asking their publishers to submit their work. Details are on the website.

James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Someday” which originally appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction in April, 2014, has been selected for inclusion in two Best of the Year anthologies: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year Volume 9, edited by Jonathan Strahan from Solaris Books, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction 32, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press.

dezart flyerMichael Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover will run January 30 through February 8 in Palm Springs, CA. On January 22, Mike’s Actual Glass will be performed by The Boiling Point Players, in Houston, TX. Mike did the sound design for The Diary of Anne Frank, running January 9-18 (dates sound familiar?) at The Actors’ Studio of Newburyport, Newburyport, MA.

In 2014, Eléna Rivera‘s (Poetry, Translation) poetry appeared in two new chapbooks: Atmosphered published by Oystercatcher Press, U.K., and Overture published by Metambesen Books. Her poems were also published in the following print and on-line journals: Aethetica Magazine, Creative Writing Annual 2015 Edition, London, UK; Aufgabe 13, Litmus Press; Upstart: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies: Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed; Jacket2, John Taggart feature; The Volta, Trash issue. She has a new book of translation, Parting Movement, Constantly Prevented by Isabelle Baladine Howald, published by Oystercatcher Press, Norfolk, U.K., 2014. She also gave a reading in Paris, France, as part of Thomas Hirschhorn’s art installation, Flamme éternelle, at the Palais de Tokyo.

81---ImageElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to report that her newest novel, We Got Him, will be published in 2016 by New Rivers Press. NRP is currently celebrating its 40th year in publishing and published Elizabeth’s most recent novel, Girl Held In Home.  Excerpts from We Got Him have appeared as stories in Epoch (story cited in Best American Short Stories), Words & Images, and Michigan Quarterly Review (the story was winner of the Lawrence Foundation Prize).  Details and dates for the novel TBA; visit:www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has been named to the board of directors of PEN New England, where she joins fellow boardmember and Stonecoast grad Anthony D’AriesPEN is a worldwide association of writers and all who celebrate literature and defend free expression. PEN New England is a branch of PEN American Center and part of International PEN, the world’s oldest international literary and human rights organization. PEN is headquartered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14): The Literary Reflections department of Literary Mama has recently opened submissions for essays that explore the world of literature—reading, writing, working as a writer—from a mother’s perspective. We seek unique approaches and deep reflection on words and motherhood. Please see our submission guidelines and our archives of past essays. Literary Mama is also hiring several editors and assistant editors. This is a wonderful opportunity to be immersed in the production of a high-quality online literary journal among a team of dynamic and caring literary mamas.

From Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, current):  Call for submissions! Amanda Pleau has been judging a flash fiction competition at MASH Stories. The difference between MASH and most other competitions: no entry fee and they will provide notification of acceptance along with critical feedback and encouragement in almost no time at all. Details at mashstories.com.

 

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Community News & Updates December 2014

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled to announce her space zombies story “Failsafe” (The Crimson Pact Volume 5, Iron Dragon Press, July 2013) has been listed by Ellen Datlow as an honorable mention for Year’s Best Horror 2013. This was the story she read from for her graduate reading. Note, you’ll see other Stonecoast names on this list too (Bonnie Stufflebeam is on there twice)! If you write horror, this list is a great way to see what publications Datlow is reading—consider submitting to them.

elysium-cvr-lrJennifer Marie Brissett‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) book Elysium, which was her Stonecoast thesis, has been published by Aqueduct Press  and is available on AmazonIndieBoundPowell’sBarnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million  or ask your local bookseller. Also, she will be interviewed on Hour of the Wolf with Jim Freund on WBAI on December 3rd.

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) just had two stories published: “About Time” will appear in the Fall issue of The MacGuffin, and “A Sensitive Man” appeared in The Penman Review in September. Barbara directs and teaches the creative writing program at Arts at the Capitol Theater, a public magnet arts high school in Willimantic, CT. Her stories and poems have appeared in a number of journals. She is currently working on her first novel. She writes under the pen name B. P. Greenbaum.

Susan Lilley‘s (Poetry, S’08) essay “Delmonico’s” was selected by Amy Hempel for Honorable Mention in Gulf Coast’s Barthelme Prize. She also has poems forthcoming in American Poetry Review. 

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) published her essay “Experimental Road” in Issue 16.2 of Fourth Genre (Fall 2014) and is pleased to report that the essay will also appear in the Winter 2014 print issue of Utne Reader.  Her essay “Acts of Courage,” winner of Creative Nonfiction’s The Human Face of Sustainability contest (Spring 2014, Issue #51), has also been nominated for a Pushcart Prize by the editors of Creative Nonfiction.  You may listen to Mary Heather’s podcast reading of “Acts of Courage” from her interview on the Jenny Green Jeans: Everyday Sustainable Living blog.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) will have a new chapbook, Planes and Trains and Automobiles, coming out from Portent Press (UK) in early 2015.

An interview with Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) about her forthcoming book, Clutching Lambs, has been posted on the Negative Capabilities Press blog.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction: The Best Unpublished Stories by New and Emerging Writers has been released by New Rivers Press. Michael C. White—Stonecoast founding faculty member, Director of the Fairfield University MFA Program, and author of Five New York Times Notable Books—read twenty stories chosen by editor Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) from nearly five-hundred entries and selected three prize winners and an honorable mention. White read all the submissions “blind.” Lee Hope, Stonecoast’s founding Director, was awarded Honorable Mention for her story “What to Take in Case of Fire” and Libby Cudmore‘s story “The Hand of God” is also included in the anthology.  The 2015 edition is currently in production and was judged by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout. The 2016 submission period will be announced in late winter.

“The Nurse We Needed,” an excerpt from a memoir manuscript by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), appears in the Fall 2014 issue of The Healing Muse. Lisa recently read at the Live Literature event on the campus of Montclair State University (NJ), where she’s teaching an undergraduate CNF course this fall and spring semesters. Her manuscript was a finalist in the lyric CNF category of the recent Subito Press contest.

Lisa Taylor’s (Poetry, ’04) story “Immersion” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Crannog Magazine. She has new fiction forthcoming in Crack the Spine and Sonder Review, and her poem “Cathedral of Shadows” was nominated for the 2014 Best Indie Lit New England anthology.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont‘s (Poetry) poems “Fifteen Views of a Christening Gown” and “Portrait with Closed Eyes” appear in the new Winter edition of Ploughshares.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just turned in Hard Light, the third Cass Neary noir novel, to St. Martin’s Press. Her essay on the photographer William Mortensen appeared recently in the Los Angeles Times. Recent reviews include  Sarah Waters’ The Paying Guests for the LA Times, and in the Washington Post, Stephen King’s Revival, Meg Wolitzer’s Belzhar, and Anne Rice’s Prince Lestat.  On December 4, she’ll give a talk about Ursula K. Le Guin and literary fantasy as part of the NEA’s Big Read at the University of Maine-Machias.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) has sold a triptych of flash fiction to the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Two of the stories, now called  “Test” and “Tryst,” were written during previous Stonecoast residencies as part of his infamous Flash Fiction Challenge. Jim thanks his workshops for their help! His one-act play “The Promise of Space” has been published in the anthology Geek Theater, edited by Erin Underwood (a Stonecoast grad) and Jen Gunnels. Browse it here. The latest installment of his “On the Net” column, called “Billions and Billions,” has appeared online and in print in Asimov’s Science Fiction. Jim will be teaching at the Clarion Writers Workshop next summer, right before the Stonecoast residency; Jim is a graduate of Clarion and is returning to teach for the eleventh time.

December 5-14, Midcoast Actors Studio, of Belfast, Maine, will stage two of Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute plays: Henny and Hitler in Hell (Adolf Hitler awakens in Henny Youngman’s Catskills dressing room) and The Muffin Man (an upscale brunch is interrupted by a homeless man who demands his English muffin grilled, not toasted).

Maine Playwrights' ShowcaseElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an essay in a new January 2015 collection from New Rivers Press: Paper Camera: A Half Century With New Rivers Press. The collection includes author Charles Baxter and Stonecoast alumni Nancy Swan. Elizabeth has work forthcoming in two more 2015 anthologies, including one from Algonquin Press edited by Elizabeth Benedict.   FINAL Book-Paper-Camera-1

Yankee Magazine features a new book by Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) in its November/December issue. This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both is one of six books written by Yankee contributors and included in a piece titled “Where We Ought to Be” by Tim Clark, who has been the award-winning national magazine’s book reviewer for two decades. Called by Clark “a true story that vitalizes an Irish woman and an African village,” This Is Paradise is the first of two books Suzanne had published this year by PFP Publishing. The second, Make a Wish But Not For Money, a novel about a palm reader in a dead mall, launched in October.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12): Submit to The Catch: Writings from Downeast Maine. Deadline December 31. Poetry, fiction, nonfiction welcome.

 

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