Tag Archives: Penny Guisinger

Community News & Updates May 2017

STONECOAST REUNION 2017

Please mark your calendars for the Stonecoast reunion, July 14-17 in Brunswick, Maine! The planning committee has been hard at work, and we’re excited to announce the schedule of events. We’d like to thank all of you who submitted proposals for readings and seminars!

We are proud to feature readings by Julia Munemo, Tony Pisculli, Richard Squires, and Cheryl Boyce Taylor. Seminar presenters include Mihku Anderson, Melanie Brooks, Meriah Lysistrata Crawford, Alexandria Delcourt, Penny Guisinger, David Healey, Barbara Kelly, Ellen Meeropol, Suri Parmar, Lisa C. Taylor, and Erin Underwood. Reunion attendees will also have the opportunity to sign up for limited-seating faculty seminars.

To see the full events schedule and register to attend the reunion, please visit the site here. All alumni who register by May 15th will receive a beautiful Stonecoast MFA coffee mug!

ALUMS

Emma Bouthillette (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) is pleased to announce her first book, A Brief History of Biddefordis scheduled to launch June 12, 2017. In this work of nonfiction published by The History Press, Emma explores four centuries of her hometown and its evolution from fishing port to booming mill town to a city re-imagined. Visit her website www.EmmaBouthillette.com for further information about the writer, the book, and news updates for Maine reading and signing events.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) had a great time at StokerCon the last weekend of April with other Stonecoasters Alumni and Faculty. She presented as a panelist on “Power Writer: How Games Can Level Up Your Fiction” and “Beat Sheets and Novel Outlines” at StokerCon and gave a paper titled “Shirley Jackson and the Fear of Ordinary People” as part of the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference. Karen attended her first novel-signing fair on April 8 for Swift For The Sun and people seemed to enjoy her pirate ship decorations. She was interviewed on local radio station 89.1 FM KHOI’s Community Bookshelf show on April 11. Viva la Stonecoast!

Karen Bovenmyer at StokerCon 2017, with pirate ship

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Raven Hair” can be found in the most recent issue of The Cream City Review. “Raven Hair,” among other things, is a riff on fairy tales, the seething resentment of a certain type of lover, and the inevitability of transformation. “Raven Hair” is also part of Julie’s collection, Uncommon Miracles, scheduled for release by PS Publishing later this year.

Florence Grende‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) memoir The Butcher’s Daughter has been nominated a finalist for the Eric Hoffer New Horizon Prize, which recognizes “superior work by a debut author.” Winner to be announced in May.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) published a work of literary journalism, “Growing Season,” on The Rumpus, where it was the debut story in the new series Torch, on the refugee and immigrant experience in America. Please check the story out here.

Alison McMahan‘s (Popular Fiction, W’10) short mystery “The New Score” appeared in the Fish Out of Water anthology (Wildside Press, April 2017), and her short story “The Drive By” appeared in the Busted! Arresting Stories from the Beat anthology (LevelBest Books, April 2017). “Kamikaze Iguanas” will appear in the MWA anthology for middle grade readers entitled Scream and Scream Again, edited by R.L. Stine (HarperCollins, 2018).

Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Novelist Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) has two recent essays published: “Losing Mom and Finding Flo” in The Writer Magazine, April issue, and “Fiction and the Costs of Activism” for the Powell’s Bookstore Blog. She will be reading from her new novel, Kinship of Clover, on May 16 at PRINT Bookstore in Portland.

Renée Olander (Poetry, W’05) has a poem, “Grace Sherwood, Witch of Pungo, Advanced in Age,” in the new anthology Forgotten Women (edited by Ginny Lowe Conners, Grayson Books, 2017); another poem, “Llewellyn Avenue Redevelopment,” is forthcoming in Free State Review.

L​isa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is now represented by Joelle Delbourgo Associates Literary Agency. Lisa’s longform essay, “An Attractive Portal to Uncertainty,” appears in the new print issue of the journal Harpur Palate (Vol. 16, No. 1). In early May, Lisa is teaching a one-day workshop, “The Art of Short Nonfiction Prose,” in Bedminster, New Jersey, sponsored by Tiferet Journal. Her lyrical, second person essay, “From Boys to Men.” kicked off Motherwell ​Magazine’s Motherhood and Waiting series. ​Her ​essay​, “Why Can’t It Be Me?,” is part of a new anthology, The Book of Hope: 31 True Stories from Real People Who Didn’t Give Up (Silver Owl Publications). And something light, “March Madness with my Son: Why I Love this Crazy Month” ​was on the Grown and Flown ​website during the NCAA tournament.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) is super excited to announce that her debut novel, In the Context of Love, has won its FOURTH finalist award: the 2016 Sarton Women’s Book Award from Story Circle Network. Also, Linda is in the 2017 Metro Detroit cast of the nationwide live storytelling event, Listen To Your Mother. Linda will be sharing the story of how she coped with the suicide of her eldest child in 2011.

Kara Storti‘s (Fiction, S’06) YA novel, Tripping Back Blue, won a 2017 Independent Publisher Book Award (IPPY) gold medal in the Young Adult Fiction category. The IPPY Awards, launched in 1996, are designed to bring increased recognition to the deserving but often unsung titles published by independent publishers. The contest drew approximately 5,000 entries from across the world.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) take on Kafka’s The Metamorphosis“Needle Mouth”, appeared in Podcastle. Her collaborative triptych poem “The Santa Monica Prophecies” appeared in Mithila Review. And her flash fiction “The Ocean Indoors” appeared in Four Way Review.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ‘04) has a poem in the recent anthology Washing Windows? Irish Women Write Poetry, published by Arlen House in honor of Eavan Boland and Catherine Rose who both played a part in the beginning of this wonderful Irish literary press. Annie Deppe also has a poem in this anthology! Lisa will offer a workshop: She Did What? Surprise in Fiction on May 13 at 10:00 a.m. at the Clickspace in Northampton. This event is sponsored by Straw Dog Writers Guild and the public can register for this event; this will be a generative workshop. She will also be offering a workshop on Hybrid Writing (mixing genres) at the Stonecoast Alumni Reunion July 14-17. I hope to see some of you there!

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) is a nominee for the Best Fanzine Hugo Award with her co-editors of Journey Planet. Her edition of Journey Planet featured a historical look back at 54 years of Boskone, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention. The Hugo Awards, presented annually since 1955, are science fiction’s most prestigious award and are voted on by members of the World Science Fiction Convention (“Worldcon”), which is taking place in Helsinki, Finland, this August.

FACULTY

The trade paperback version of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) The Risen is now out from Anchor Books. On June 6th, David will be featured in the Mosesian Arts Center’s Earfull series in Boston . He’ll be reading along with Jayne Anne Phillips in an evening of words of and music. He’d love to see some Stonecoast faces at the event!

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a Guest of Honor at Stokercon, in Long Beach, along with George R.R. Martin and Stonecoast’s own Nancy Holder, the convention’s toastmaster. Hand’s novel Hard Light is a finalist for the Bran Stoker Award. She did a podcast interview for Wired.com, talking about her recent book Fire and her experiences with a government think tank, researching the future of fire management in an environmentally challenged age. Forthcoming reviews include Jeff Vandermeer’s Borne, for The Los Angeles Times.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel We Got Him has been chosen as one of three finalists for the 2016 Midwest Book Awards in Fiction. The awards have been running for 27 years by the Midwest Independent Publishing Association; winners will be announced in May. In April, Elizabeth was interviewed about We Got Him on Urban Update (Channel 7, NBC Boston), Woman Watch (forthcoming on WBZ-AM radio, Boston), and WATD-FM, the South Shore News show. On April 30, she and Suzanne Strempek Shea have their book launch for Soap Opera Confidential at Newtonville Books in MA, featuring star readers including Stonecoast alumna Brenda Sparks Prescott. On May 11th, Elizabeth will read from her novel We Got Him at the Kittery Library in Kittery, ME, at 6:30 p.m. Finally: in Chicago, the Jeff Awards for Theater featured two nominations—Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress—for the 2016 Chicago production of Elizabeth’s Tonya & Nancy: the Rock Opera.

 

 

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Community News & Updates October 2016

ATTENTION: ALUMNI

The 2017 Stonecoast Alumni Reunion Committee wants to hear from you! Led by co-chairs Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Frank Ard (Popular Fiction, S’14), Peter Maskaluk (Fiction, ’13), Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06), and Mihku Anderson (Fiction, S’10), Stonecoast is excited to celebrate 15 years in the literary community. Please fill out this brief survey with your attendance and preferences: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/86MCNWV

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A message from the husband of Christine Tierney (Poetry, S’09), who is currently in need of a kidney.

Dear Family, Friends, and Universe,

Christine is a caring, generous, and beautiful person with probably the best sense of humor on the planet. She has been working with children for the past 23 years as an after school director. She is also a gifted poet, artist, and animal lover. But most of all, she is the absolute love of my life.

Eight years ago Christine was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease, (PKD). PKD is progressive and incurable. It causes clusters of cysts to grow inside the kidneys. As these cysts enlarge from fluid buildup, kidney failure can result. Unfortunately, Christine’s cysts are rapidly growing and her kidneys are losing function. She is now in need of a kidney transplant.

Christine was placed on the national kidney transplant list in August 2015, and is awaiting a deceased donor kidney, but this list is 80,000 names long, and the wait time for a deceased donor kidney is eight years or more. Christine is hoping for a transplant from a living donor because living donor kidneys have greater success rates than deceased donor kidneys, and nearly double the years of function. Through the living donation program, a healthy person can donate one of their kidneys and return to full health after a brief recovery.

I was tested to see if I am a match for Christine. Unfortunately, I am not. Both of Christine’s parents are now too old for organ donation. Finally, you may have read the article is The Boston Globe about a former Cambridgeport parent who was willing to donate and was a likely match, but has since been diagnosed with a medical condition that makes her an unsuitable donor.

So now we are casting our net wider, in hopes of finding someone who might be interested in donating a kidney to Christine. This would be a great gift to the both of us.

If you cannot do this, we understand perfectly. If you know anyone who might, please forward this letter widely. We are so grateful to you for passing it along to your family, friends, coworkers or classmates, congregation, or any other communities to which you belong. Also, please feel free to post this on all forms of social media.

If you would like to learn more about living kidney donation, please feel free to call me at (857) 334-9794 or email me at ljblanko@yahoo.com.

Thank you from the bottom of my heart,

Luis Julio Blanco

ALUMS

Eric M. Bosarge (Popular Fiction, W ’12) will present a seminar entitled “Archetypes and the Power of Attraction: Creating Dynamic Characters and Conflict in Fiction” to the Maine Romance Writers Association on October 8th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to report she is now an official Affiliate Member of the Horror Writer’s Association (her sale to Gamut last month made her eligible and her application was accepted!). Two of her Halloween recipes “Mummy Calzones” and “Witches Wands” will appear in the next issue of the HWA newsletter with accompanying photos. She’s also excited her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” originally published in Parsec’s Triangulations: Beneath the Surface will be reprinted in Cosmic Shores and Eldritch Tales this fall. Furthermore, her science fiction romance poem “The Blind Elephants of Io” was selected for performance at Arachnae Press’s Shortest Day: Solstice Shorts Festival 2016 funded by the Arts Council of England, in Greenwich on Wednesday, December 21, and will be published in a subsequent anthology of collected writings accepted by the show—this poem won a Long Form Honorable Mention in the 2016 Science Fiction Poetry Association Contest. A reprint of Karen’s haunted house abduction micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in IronSoap.com’s 200CCs Issue #4 on October 7. Finally, Karen is thrilled to report she’s been asked to write an essay for Pseudopod Horror Podcast’s tenth anniversary Kickstarter.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay published in the Fall issue of The Journal.

9781608933952Kate Cone (Fiction, ’08) announces the publication of What’s Brewing in New England (Down East Books, Camden, ME), a guide to craft breweries in the six-state region. Kate’s first edition of What’s Brewing was published in 1997. After almost 20 years, Kate revisits the explosive New England beer scene with interviews, stories and descriptions of the beers. Available on Amazon.

For the second year in a row, a Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay has been named as a Notable in Best American Essays. This year, her piece “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” (which won a Maine Literary Award and was nominated for a Pushcart) made the notables list; the piece was a Sunday Rumpus Essay in July 2015. Penny’s book, Postcards from Here, just received a glowing review at Tinderbox Poetry Journal. Here is an excerpt from the review: “… the postcards come to the reader as precious objects assembled in a gorgeous yet unruly box. Here, all at once, we experience the lived chaos of mind, marriage, children, body, and place. It is a truth, a difficult representation to achieve, and Guisinger does so with skill and grace. Postcards From Here reminds us that a postcard’s purpose is not memory or story, but to send a small piece of oneself as a memento, rather than a definitive record or missive.”

Andrea Lani‘s (Fiction, W’14) essay “Monarch Summers” appeared in the Spring-Autumn issue of Snowy Egret. She also had two essays published online this month: “The Big Night” at Coffee + Crumbs and “How I Went from Domestic to Wild” at Role Reboot.

Will Ludwigsen’s (Popular Fiction, W’11) story “The Leaning Lincoln” is appearing in the October/November 2016 double issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction; he describes the story as “an autobiographical journey into the psyche of a boy coming to terms with the absence of magical justice in the world.” He also sold his story “Night Fever” to Asimov’s, too, and it’s likely to appear later in 2017.

9843219Alexis Paige‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in 2015, has been named a Best American Essays Notable in the 2016 anthology. In addition, Paige’s first book, Not a Place on Any Map, which won the 2016 Vine Leaves Press Vignette Collection Award, will be published December 5th by Vine Leaves Press. The book, a collection of lyric essays, will be available for pre-order in early November.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was honored to learn that one of her essays was selected for the Notables Essays section of Best American Essays 2016. (The piece, “Not Quite Meet Cute,” originally appeared in the Spring 2015 issue of Blue Lyra Review.) Lisa’s essay, “On the Near Side of the Tracks,” appears in the current (Fall 2016) issue of Brevity.

Beyond Rain Man by Anne K. Ross (pen name for Creative Nonfiction, Winter ’07 graduate) is reviewed by Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) in the current issue of Mom Egg Review; the book review can be found here. Also, Anne will be on a LitQuake “Politics of Parenting” panel in the San Francisco Bay Area on October 9. Other events listed at www.beyondrainman.com.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz‘s (Fiction, S’09) novel, In the Context of Love, is a 2016 Readers’ Favorite Book Award Finalist. That marks the third award for the book she worked on while at Stonecoast.

Wilde Stories 2016Bonnie Jo Stufflebeams (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

Ashley K. Warren‘s (Fiction, S ’12) poem “Symptoms of a Brain Injury” was nominated by Easy Street for the 2016 Best of the Net anthology. Also, Ashley will serve as an artist in residence at the Billings Public Library in Billings, Montana, beginning in October. During her residency she will work with teen writers on the Letters to the Next President project, an initiative hosted by the National Writing Project, KQED, public media, and Educator Innovator partners.

Lindsey Wells (publishes as Lindsey Kemp; Creative Nonfiction, S’15) won the Empire Award (second place) in the New York Screenplay Contest for her New Girl spec script, “B.C.,” which she wrote as part of her third semester project under the guidance of the amazing Mike Kimball.

FACULTY

Letters from LimboJeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) new book of poetry, Letters from Limbo, will be launching this month from CavanKerry Press. Additional information can be found on Jeanne Marie’s website.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Guiltless Pleasures” has been accepted for publication in Crazyhorse Magazine. Aaron’s essay “Edward Albee Was My Mailman,” a tribute to the late playwright who wrote Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and many others, is in The Millions. In other news, Aaron will be delivering a presentation on Drown by Junot Diaz for Hispanic Heritage Month at the DC Public Library. And last but not least, if you’re in the DC area and having trouble with writer’s block, come to Aaron’s two-session class at Politics & Prose Bookstore, Breaking Through Writer’s Block.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just returned from a book tour in Sweden, where her novels Generation Loss and Available Dark (briefly) topped the bestseller list at #1 and #3 (the new Harry Potter was #4). In September, she’ll be featured at the National Book festival in Washington, DC, where she’ll be interviewed by NPR’s Maureen Corrigan, and will also appear at the Fall for the Book festival in Fairfax, Virginia. Recent reviews include Tama Janowitz’s memoir Scream for The Los Angeles Times and Nisi Shawl’s novel Everfair for The Washington Post.

As noted in a previous Community blog, October 1 will see the debut of two new works by Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction). His short play “Glitch” premieres as part of the Paragon Science Fiction and Fantasy Theater festival at the The Public House Theatre in Chicago. And his novelette “One Sister, Two Sisters, Three” will be published in the Tenth Anniversary Issue of Clarkesworld Magazine.

Mike Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play The Secret of Comedy runs October 20-30 (Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.; Sundays at 2:00 p.m.) at Mayo Street Arts, Mayo Street, Portland, ME. For more information and reservations, click here.

the-secret-of-comedy

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) lyric essay “Some Things About that Day” was featured in Becoming a Great Essayist, a twenty-four part online “Great Courses” lecture series taught by the literary scholar Jennifer Cognard-Black (2016). Her essay “The Microphone Erotic” was published in the anthology From Curlers to Chainsaws: Women Writers and Their Machines (Michigan State University Press, 2016), and her essay “When the Band Broke Up” was awarded the 2016 Alligator Juniper Nonfiction Prize and was published in Alligator Juniper, Issue XX, 2016. In July and August 2016, Debra was invited to complete a month long artist residency at Le Moulin à Nef, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts location in Auvillar, France. Working with the painter Thomas Rice, Debra worked on a collaborative research nonfiction project about the oil boom in her home state of North Dakota, entitled “The Future Eaters.”

Tickets are now on sale for the six-week Chicago run of Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera; recent media coverage has included a Chicago Tribune piece that included the show on a Theater Preview list of “Tuneful Treats.” For ticket info, visit Theater Wit.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

Amanda Horvath as Tonya in the Chicago production of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera.

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates February 2016

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is ecstatic to announce she has signed a contract with a small press for her 26k word novella “Swift for the Sun” (historical pirate adventure/romance) which will be released under a pseudonym in the first quarter of 2017. It’s the biggest advance and largest royalties percentage she’s ever signed for and she’s very excited. Furthermore, Karen’s poem “NeverNever Holes,” originally published on Zingara Poet, will be reprinted in a forthcoming Love Poems anthology edited by Johnny M. Tucker, Jr. Also, the second issue of Mothership Zeta Magazine, featuring nonfiction by Stonecoast alumnus Adam Gallardo and faculty James Patrick Kelly is now available for download! Karen is the Assistant Editor, Nonfiction, for this magazine, which is led by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, Editor in Chief.

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Space Heart,” an essay by Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11), appeared in the Winter 2015 issue of Solstice Literary Magazine. Her poem “Flowering” was re-published in A Year of Being Here. In February, she will be an Associate Artist under writer David Shields at the residency program of the Atlantic Center for the Arts. From there, she will go to Foundation Obras in Portugal for a three-week residency.

Isthmus-issue-4-e1452206003965Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “Holes in Heaven”—a story that concerns itself with sibling rivalry, stellar nurseries, and exiled children—can be found in the print journal Isthmus; an excerpt is available online. Issue 21 of the Small Beer podcast also came out in January and features Julie’s narration of Mary Rickert’s story “Cold Fires.”

Nikki Flionis (Fiction, ’10) is among many long-time Bostonians reflecting on their lives in Streets of Echoes, the latest volume in the City of Boston’s memoir project series. Developed in collaboration with Grubstreet, this volume includes residents of Back Bay, Fenway, Beacon Hill-West End, and Dorchester. Flionis’ essay, “Rooms with Adieu,” focuses on the old rooming house culture, wiped out with stunning speed by the advent of the residential condominium in the 1980’s.

_6757124Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “The Sound of Galton’s Whistle” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Maine author and former Pushcart winner Jennifer Lunden in December 2015. And 2016 is off to a grand start: Penny’s book Postcards from Here is now available for order.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry/Artistic Collaboration, W’08) was awarded the first Oregon Literary Fellowship for Writers of Color in 2016. Her debut poetry collection, the small claim of bones, placed second in the 2015 International Latino Book Awards, and she was selected by Poets & Writers Magazine as a 2014 Notable Debut Poet.

Joe M McDermott‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) short story “Snowbird” appears in the March 2016 issue of Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to have her essay “Seduction” included in Fracture: Essays, Poems, and Stories on Fracking in America, an anthology to be released by Ice Cube Press later this month. Fracture explores the well-known and little-known complexities of fracking through first-hand experience, investigative journalism, storytelling, and verse. The collection will also feature the work of Stonecoast faculty Debra Marquart, former Stonecoast faculty Barbara Hurd, and several other acclaimed environmental writers. The book can be pre-ordered here.

Lisa Romeo’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) essay “Sound and Fury, Signifying” appeared in Synaesthesia Magazine in January. Another CNF piece, “​Gray,” received honorable mention in the 2015​ Our Past Loves contest and 9780997040005-BeyondRainMan2_Front_RGB_72dpi_5.5x8.5_webis now posted online (scroll down). ​Lisa has ​been invited to present a craft seminar at HippoCamp 2016​: A Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA, in August​. ​Conference registration is now open.​ Lisa’s humor essay, “The Long Pink Line,” has been accepted for Flash Nonfiction Funny.

Anne K. Ross’s (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) book Beyond Rain Man: What One Psychologist Learned Raising a Son on the Autism Spectrum will be published on April 5, 2016, by Leatherback Press.

Tripping Back Blue coverKara Storti‘s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Tripping Back Blue, will be released on April 1st by CarolRhoda Lab, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about Finn, a 17-year-old full of paradoxes. He’s a drug dealer, but he’s scoring money to send his twin sister to Harvard. He’s desperate to shoot up even though he’s the most popular kid in Dammertown. He’s a philosopher and orator who’s failing all his classes. The only time he finds peace is when he’s bird-watching. Finn’s life begins to spiral out of control, until he discovers a miracle drug called indigo. Finn is convinced that the drug is the way out of everything broken in his life. But is it really as magical as it seems?

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular fiction, S’13) stories “Feeding the Skeleton Cats” and “Tornado Season” appeared in Eleven ElevenHer story “The Damaged,” originally published in Interzone, appeared on the podcast StarShipSofa. “Skeletons,” originally in Room, was reprinted on the LGBTQ podcast Glittership.

Olive Sullivan (Fiction/Cross-Genre Poetry, S’15) is the editor of a new fine arts magazine produced by students in the Department of Communication at Missouri Southern State University, where Sullivan is an assistant professor. The magazine, Vivid, hosted a launch party January 22nd in downtown Joplin. The website is www.vividfinearts.com. Here is a link to a TV news feature about the launch.

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grimmdj-front-finalBoskone 53, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, will feature among their program participants Stonecoast faculty James Patrick Kelly and Theodora Goss as well as alumnae Julie C. Day and Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09). This year Erin Underwood is serving as Program Head for Boskone, and she was recently appointed as Chair for next year’s convention. Join us in Boston, MA from February 19-21, 2016, and visit the Boskone website for membership information. The Grimm Future, edited by popular fiction alumna Erin Underwood, will be released in February 2016 by NESFA Press and will be featured as this year’s Boskone book. The Grimm Future is a new science fiction anthology of reimagined Grimm fairy tales that features original fiction by 14 of today’s most exciting authors including Stonecoast faculty member Nancy Holder and alumna Sandra McDonald.

Christopher Watkins (Poetry, W’08) marks a return to songwriting with a new record deal and a new album! Preacher Boy – The National Blues is now available direct from Altco Recordings, or on iTunes and other digital music services

An Unfinished Story about Eagles,” by Rick Wile (Creative Nonfiction, W’05), appears in the latest edition of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices. His blog, The Geriatric Pilgrim, now comes out twice a month.

FACULTY

kanth3Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) review of Garth Greenwell’s novel What Belongs to You appeared in the New York Times Book Review.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new story titled “Whatever Kills in Vegas” in Kolchak: Passages of the Macabre, published by Moonstone Books.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) poem “Lament” has been selected by guest editor, Edward Hirsch, for inclusion in The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology. The poem, “Lament,” a section of a long poem in Marquart’s recent collection, Small Buried Things, addresses the ravages of best-american-poetry-2016-9781501127557_lgfracking in her home state of North Dakota. The poem was originally published by New Letters in 2014. The Best American Poetry 2016 anthology will be published by Scribner in September 2016.

CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS

By request of the editors, Lisa Romeo S’08 would like to pass along this opportunity:​  Flash Nonfiction Funny, a planned collection of humorous short-short nonfiction pieces. Editors Tom Hazuka and Dinty W. Moore are soliciting submissions, 750 words maximum; both unpublished and previously published selections are welcome. Email submissions as Microsoft Word documents to either tom@tomhazuka.com or moored4@ohio.edu (not both, please).

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Community News & Updates January 2016

ALUMS

Catwalk_NewElisabeth Tova Bailey (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) received a 2016 National Endowment of the Arts fellowship. There were 1,763 submissions this year and 37 fellowships awarded. NEA press release can be viewed here.

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is delighted to share that Catwalk, the third book in her Animals in Focus Mystery series from Midnight Ink, is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for fiction in the Dog Writers Association of America’s annual writing competition. The first book in her series, Drop Dead on Recall, won the Maxwell in 2013, and the second book, The Money Bird, was a finalist last year. Winners will be announced in February.

Blood RegisterPaul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) has published “Blood Register,” a short story for the Pillars of Eternity campaign setting. Find it on Obsidian Entertainment’s media/stories page alongside the work of his colleagues.

Nylah Lyman‘s (Poetry, S’10) poem “God and Illness” has been accepted for publication in the winter 2015 issue of Poetry Quarterly.

Susan MacLean, pen Name S.J. MacLean (Fiction, S’06), was awarded First Prize in Fiction in the Briar Cliff Review annual fiction contest. Her fiction has appeared or will appear in Inkwell, Pennsylvania Literary Review, May Day Magazine (New American Press) and several San Francisco newspapers.

Autumn Newman‘s (Poetry, ’09) double-sonnet, “Shopping with Whitney Houston,” has been published by Able Muse in their Winter 2015 issue. You can see a video of her reading the poem on their website. This poem has also been nominated for a Pushcart poetry prize by the editor of Able Muse. 

Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) served as Visiting Artist in October 2015 at Bay Path University, where she spoke with university classes and taught workshops, lectured at Writers’ Day, and was the featured speaker for the Kaleidoscope Series; she will join the Bay Path University writing faculty in January 2016. At the end of October, Alexis presented on a panel (with Summer ’13 CNF alum Penny Guisinger) about the dangers of publishing narrative nonfiction at the NonfictionNow conference in Flagstaff, AZ. Her essay “Drunkalogue Diptych” appears in the Fall 2015 issue of The Pinch, and essay “Entropy as Islands as Stars” will be published in the Winter 2016 issue of the New Madrid Journal. Her work has also been accepted into the anthology Second Blooming, forthcoming from Mercer University Press, edited by Susan Cushman. Her essay “The Right to Remain,” published in The Rumpus in March, was nominated by the Sunday Rumpus Essay editors for a Pushcart Prize; this is her second Pushcart nomination.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) had two stories appear in December. Her Stonecoast-workshopped “In the City of Martyrs” appeared on The Toast, and her story “Sleepers,” originally in Interzone, appeared in audio on The Overcast. 

Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14) has a story in the January 2016 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction magazine, titled “The Singing Bowl.” Another story first published in Asimov’s, “The Redemption of Kip Banjeree,” appears in translation in a recent issue of the Russian science fiction magazine Esli.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Jennifer Castello (Popular Fiction), Marian Rosarum (Popular Fiction, S’15), and Theodora Goss (Faculty) have had a panel accepted to the upcoming International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts. This cross-genre panel is titled: “The Wonder Piece in Alternate History: Using Fantastical and Scientific Elements to Highlight the Past, Present, and Future.” M.W. Bychowski from George Washington University will also be appearing on this panel. They will present in Orlando, FL, in mid-March.

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FACULTY

Sarah Braunstein‘s (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) essay “Night of the Moose” is forthcoming in The Sun magazine (February 2016). In January, she will teach at the National YoungArts Foundation in Miami.

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was a literary Guest of Honor at Comic-Con Portugal in early December. The film option for Gabriel’s Story has been renewed (for the thirteenth time!) by Redwave Films, and Pride of Carthage has gone into its second option period with Sonar Entertainment. They’re hoping to develop it as a television miniseries.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching a four-week class titled “Becoming a Better Writer: Revising and Rewriting” at legendary DC bookstore Politics and Prose this coming February. His short story “Loo Rolls” is a finalist in the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival Contest. As a finalist, the story will be published in an anthology published by Bold Strokes Books. To learn more about this international festival of LGBT literature, which takes place April 1-3 in New Orleans, see www.sasfest.org.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be a guest (and the only U.S. writer!) at the 2016 Crimetime Gotland literary festival, Sweden’s celebration of Nordic Noir. She’s just been announced as guest of honor at the 2017 World Horror Convention, along with George R. R. Martin and Peter Crowther. Recent work includes a Washington Post piece on writing novelizations, a Los Angeles Times review of the iconic Finnish writer Leena Krohn, and a column on tribute anthologies to Octavia Butler and Samuel R. Delany for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will be a guest at Gallifrey One: Station 27, the 27th Annual North American Dr. Who Convention. Gallifrey will be held February 12-14 at the Marriott Los Angeles International Airport Hotel in Los Angeles, CA. She will be teaching “Finding the Scary” (Workshop #15) at Horror University, which takes place during the 2016 Horror Writers Association StokerCon™ May 12-15 at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas. Nancy has accepted an invitation to be a keynote speaker at the Spokane Film and Literary Convention (“Connecting Writers with Hollywood”) in Spokane, WA, next September 8-10. She has also accepted an invitation to preside over the Horror Writers Association 2017 StokerCon™ as Toastmistress  in April 2017 aboard the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA; guests will include George R.R. Martin.

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51Px4GD+sML._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_Upcoming on January 12:  Jim Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) massive (700 page!) career retrospective collection from Centipede Press.  This is a limited edition aimed at book collectors in the Masters of Science Fiction series, which has honored some of the greats of the genre.  It’s called (surprise) James Patrick Kelly: Masters of Science Fiction. Jim is the first living author to be chosen for this series.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 20-minute play Sully’s Gone will be part of “Evening Broadcasts” (think Twilight Zone), which will run Jan 22-Feb 7 at The Players’ Ring Theatre, in Portsmouth, NH. Reservations are encouraged.

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StonecoastRElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) have signed on bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard and soap star Cady McClain, a two-time Daytime Emmy winner, for their forthcoming 2017 anthology on Soap Operas. The book will also include a poem by the current lead star of The Bold and The Beautiful, Thorsten Kaye, as well as an essay by Stonecoast’s own star poet and author Ted Deppe. Elizabeth and Suzanne are also happy to have work together in the new December 2015 issue of The Stonecoast Review.

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Community News & Updates October 2015

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51+sb3Zv9WL._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is pleased to announce the release of Shepherd’s Crook, her fourth Animals in Focus mystery from Midnight Ink. Her essay “A Question of Corvids” will also appear this month in the 2015 Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology edited by Rebecca Skloot, and her poem “Spin” will be appear in 27 Views of Wilmington, also being released in October by Eno Publishers. Sheila will be giving a reading with several other North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship recipients in Wilmington on October 4th, and as part of a “release slam” for 27 Views on October 24.

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W’12) short story “Taking My Time” appeared in The New Haven Review.

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Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “What the Dollhouse Said” will be in a forthcoming episode of Pseudopod! She’s so excited! She’s been an avid listener for four years and has every episode on Podisc. Her micro fiction “So Normal and Unwritten” will be reprinted in a forthcoming edition of Bosley Gravel’s Cavalcade of Terror. Her story “The Scarlet Cloak,” from her Stonecoast thesis, will be reprinted in the December 1 issue of Luna Station Quarterly, a speculative fiction magazine featuring stories by emerging women authors. She is using skills she learned writing Stonecoast homework to create book reviews and editorials for the magazine Mothership Zeta, which debuts October 15 with its first issue (she is the nonfiction editor, alumna Mur Lafferty is the editor-in-chief). Issue 0, featuring book reviews from Stonecoast faculty Liz Hand and short story reviews from alum Bonnie Stufflebeam is already available for free download at http://mothershipzeta.org/. Issue 1 will feature a short story by Bonnie and a “Story Doctor” analysis of why her story works so brilliantly by faculty James Patrick Kelly, as well as a “Favorite 2014-2015 Graphic Novels” review by alum Adam Gallardo. Karen is thrilled to be working with so many talented people!!!!

The Big Rewind CoverLibby Cudmore‘s (Creative Nonfiction/Popular Fiction S’10) debut novel The Big Rewind (William Morrow) received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews, who called it “A mystery that will inspire more than one playlist and, hopefully, a sequel.” The book is slated for release on February 2, 2016.

A short film written by Adam Kreutz Gallardo (Popular Fiction, S’12), Monster Movie, is an official selection at this year’s McMinnville Short Film Festival on October 3rd. The film is based on his novel, Zomburbia.

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Penny Guisinger’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) piece “Coming Out” is listed as a notable essay in the 2015 volume of Best American Essays, edited by Ariel Levy. The piece originally appeared in Fourth Genre, fall 2014.

9780373211722_BB.inddLexa Hillyer (Poetry, S’10) was named producer on a forthcoming TV show from WBTV based on Legacy of Kings by Eleanor Herman, the first book in a series she created, plotted and edited with her literary company Paper Lantern Lit. Read more here.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold his short story “Snowbirds” to Analog Science Fiction and Fact.

Authors Bill Roorbach, Susan Conley, and Meredith Hall will discuss the “Joys & Challenges of Writing Fiction, Non-fiction, & Memoir,” moderated by Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ’11) on October 18, 2015, from 1:00-4:00 p.m. Open to the public. Authors will have books for signing. Contact Laurie Skillings: laurie@addwithease.com for location and directions.

Karen Pullen‘s (Popular Fiction, S’08) short story “#grenadegranny” is included in the Bouchercon 2015 anthology Murder Under the Oaks, edited by Art Taylor and published by Down & Out. The anthology will be available after Bouchercon, the world’s biggest mystery fan convention, in Raleigh, NC, on October 8-11. Her second mystery novel, Cold Heart, has been accepted by Five Star Cengage for publication in August 2016.

Marian Romero‘s (Popular Fiction, S’15) story “Ruta Lato and the Ghost of the Revolution” will be appearing in Betwixt this month.

AOY+poster+WEBAll Our Yesterdays, a new film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W ’07), begins its festival run with an October 18th premiere at HorrorQuest Film Festival in Atlanta, Georgia, just in time for Halloween.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s (Popular fiction, S’13) “Sleeping With Spirits” is due to appear in Motherzhip Zeta, the new magazine edited by fellow Stonecoasters Mur Lafferty and Karen Bovenmyer, on October 15; this story was written for a Stonecoast humor workshop with James Patrick Kelly and Aaron Hamburger. Her roundup of the best short fiction of 2014 was in their Issue 0, available for free download at http://mothershipzeta.org/. Her dark fantasy story “A Careful Fire” will appear in Beneath Ceaseless Skies this month. Her poem “The Werewolf” has been reprinted in Tony Barnstone and Michelle Mitchell-Foust’s Monster Verse anthology.

Growing a New TailLisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry, S’04) first collection of short fiction launched in Ireland on September 3rd (Pearse Street Library in Dublin) and September 5th (Charlie Byrne’s Book Shop in Galway). Ted and Annie Deppe were among the attendees at the Galway reading. It will launch in the United States on November 14, 2015, at the Mansfield Center Library in Mansfield, CT. See www.lisactaylor.com for details of her upcoming readings. Here is a link to one of the early reviews of the book (even though it says it was released in January, this is incorrect; the book was published in Ireland in August). This collection should be widely available by mid-November. Lisa looks forward to reading in Maine, perhaps in December or January.

FACULTY

51WzKfO4hIL._SX343_BO1,204,203,200_Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) poem “Bride” appears in the new anthology Monster Verse: Human and Inhuman Poems, edited by Tony Barnstone and Michelle Mitchell-Foust.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) will give a reading for Old Dominion University’s 38th Annual Literary Festival at 12:30 p.m. on 8 October at the Virginia Beach Higher Education Center, Virginia Beach, VA.

Vivas to Those Who Have Failed CoverMartín Espada‘s (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) new collection of poems, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed, is forthcoming from W.W. Norton in January.

Crimson Peak novelization cvrNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a new book out on October 15: the official novelization for the new Guillermo del Toro movie, Crimson Peak. She was approved by del Toro and attended a private screening at Legendary Pictures with some VIPs from Universal Studios. Both the movie and book will come out in mid-October. “In Arkham Town Where I was Bound,” a Lovecraftian story narrated by Edgar Allan Poe received an honorable mention in Ellen Datlow’s Year’s Best Horror of the Year Volume 7. Nancy read the story last winter at Stonecoast.

October 14-25, Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Best Enemies will be staged at the Studio Theater at Portland Stage, 25A Forest Ave, Portland ME. Two cowboys, lone survivors of a sabotaged rodeo cruise, are marooned together on a tiny desert island. To preserve their sanity, they’ve invented imaginary geography and instituted a system of laws, but ultimately they go to war over their shared cowboy hat. The Portland Phoenix called the Best Enemies “A sly, haunting, and remarkably fun new existential comedy . . . nimble, irreverent, and immensely entertaining,” and The Portsmouth Herald described it as “Smart, funny, poignant and creepy.” Tickets available for purchase here.

Best EnemiesDavid Mura (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) published his essay, “Asian Americans: The Front & Back of the Bus” in the anthology A Sense of Regard: Essays on Poetry & Race. He was guest blogger for the Gulf Coast Literary Journal (his own blog is blog.davidmura.com). He’s just completed a book of essays on creative writing and is finishing up his book of essays on race. His conversations on race and the arts with Minnesota artists can be found on youtube and his conversation with Stonecoast faculty member Alexs Pate is also on the Minnesota Public Radio website.

 

 

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Community News & Updates June 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) drabble about an unfortunate house cat entitled “What Dolls Eat” will appear in The Were-Traveler in late May/early June. She is most pleased the editor called it “damn creepy” in her acceptance letter.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) published a short story “A Song For You” on Motherboard themed from the Donny Hathaway song of the same name and the myth of Orpheus. Her novel Elysium has been placed on the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Honor List and is a Finalist for the Locus Award for Best First Novel.

808_largeJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Re’em Song” is now available in issue 258 of Interzone. Turns out so is Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Doors.” This is almost more fun than one Stonecoast writer can handle—thankfully there are two of them to handle the load.

Hank Garfield (Fiction, S’04) will present a paper entitled “Madmen on the Water: The Golden Globe Singlehanded Sailboat Race of 1968-69 and Robert Stone’s Outerbridge Reach at the annual Sport Literature Association conference June 28 in Johnson City, Tennessee. See Hank’s blog, Slower Traffic, on walking, bicycling and not owning a car, at slowertraffic.net.

Bone SongBunny Goodjohn‘s (Poetry, W’07) first poetry collection, Bone Song, launches at the downtown YWCA in Lynchburg on June 18th at 7:15 p.m. Bone Song won the 2014 Liam Rector Prize and includes a jacket blurb from the rather fabulous Baron Wormser. The collection is available at Amazon; however, signed copies with free positive energy may be ordered from Bunny’s Etsy store.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is proud to announce that her first book, a collection of micro-essays called Postcards from Here, will be released by Vine Leaves Press in 2016. Some pieces from the book have been previously published, and curious people can read online excerpts here and here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Short Nonfiction for her lyric essay “Saudade,” which was first published in The Stonecoast Review. She thanks Review editors Alexandria DelCourt, Alexis Paige, and others for helping to improve the piece. A shorter version was published this month in Hippocampus Magazine and is available here. Earlier this month, Lesley had a review/essay inspired by Los Angeles writer Wendy C. Ortiz’s second memoir, Hollywood Notebook, up on The Rumpus.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a book trailer for his debut poetry collection, Drift.

The High Cost of Flowers by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) won the best literary fiction award and the best contemporary fiction award in the 2014 Midwest Book Awards held April 13. This was the 25th anniversary of the awards with books submitted by independent, small, and academic presses in a twelve-state region. The High Cost of Flowers was released by Calumet Editions.

0615asimovs_smWill Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11) appears in the July 2015 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction with “Acres of Perhaps.”

Mary Heather Noble‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) essay “Reintroduction” is featured in Issue 7: Wilderness of Minerva Rising. She will be participating in the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, this month, and will be working with acclaimed environmental writer Scott Russell Sanders. Mary Heather has also been invited as a writer-in-residence for PLAYA’s “Beyond Creating: A Climate of Change,” an Art + Ecology themed artist retreat that fosters collaboration among artists and scientists around environmental issues. PLAYA is a nonprofit organization based in Summer Lake, Oregon, that supports innovative thinking through work in the arts, literature, natural sciences and other fields of creative inquiry.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction (New Rivers Press)—an annual anthology of the best new fiction from established and emerging writers, edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04)—has just been awarded the Midwest Independent Publishers Association award for Fiction: Short Story/Anthology, the first time an anthology has won the top prize. Former Stonecoast Director Lee Hope is one of the authors in the anthology, and founding faculty member Michael C White was the finalist and prize-awarding judge. He read the submissions blind. Submissions for the 2016 are being accepted through Submittable. Details are available at the New Rivers Press web site.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essay “Your Boyfriend’s Back” appears in the May issue of Front Porch. Lisa will present at HippoCamp 15, Hippocampus Magazine’s creative nonfiction conference in August. A preview of her session is at their blog.

Kara L. Storti’s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Indigo in D-Town, will be released in Spring 2016 by CarolRhoda Lab, a division of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about charming but tortured Phineas “Finn” Walt, a seventeen-year-old drug dealer who develops an unexpected friendship with an 80-year-old addict. Together they harvest and deal an unknown drug that transports the user to a favorite memory after which a “souvenir” appears from the past. The drug “hippo” is miraculous, highly addictive, and threatens to ruin Finn’s life by dredging up horrific childhood memories, tumbling him further into heroin abuse, and involving a psychopathic drug king out for blood.

51K-wdh5TxL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) is honored to have her essay “An Internship at New Rivers Press” included in the 50th Anniversary publication of New Rivers Press titled Paper Camera. This edition is published as a celebration of the enduring quality of the small press in the face of an ever-increasing pressure by other modes of publication in the writing world. The contents are intended to highlight the dynamic range of material considered by New Rivers Press as noteworthy of finding its way into print.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) is the winner of the New Works Competition at Hugo House for a flash fiction story, “Mosaic.” She will read alongside Meg Wolitzer, Justin Torres, and Amelia Gray in Seattle the end of May. Growing a New Tail, Lisa’s debut collection of short fiction, will launch late summer 2015 and in September in Dublin and Galway. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press.

Julie L. Vandekreke‘s (formerly Scharf; Creative Nonfiction, S’10) poem “Transparent” is forthcoming in the June 2015 edition of Mused: Bella Online Literary Review.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her full-length poetry manuscript, Pierce & Brand’s World of Dangerous Wonders, is currently a semifinalist in the 2015 Negative Capability Press Book Competition. In addition, her chapbook manuscript, Imperative, is currently a semifinalist in YesYes Books’ 2015 Vinyl 45s Chapbook Contest.

2015 Negative Capability Press Book CompetitionMarco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has two new pieces out.  His essay, “A House of Swing Doors: This Future Life (Calvatea gigantea)” on mushrooms and mortality, which began and greatly profited from being in a Stonecoast workshop, is in the May issue of DIAGRAM. His piece “Some Rules for Foraging” will appear in the summer issue of Taproot. Marco was also a finalist for the Sumer Literary Seminar Disquiet program in Lisbon and will be participating in the program this summer.

FACULTY

Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) will be telling a story for The Moth, on May 30th, at a sold-out show at Portland’s State Theater. The episode will be broadcast nationally on NPR. His story will be about the brief and wondrous life of Poppins, the cat.

Portuguese The Sacred Band V2The final volume of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) Acacia series comes out this month in Portugal. It’s called Acácia – Vozes da Profecia, and is the sixth book in the series, as the publisher, Saída de Emergência, divided each book into two volumes.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” will be published in the fall issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) recent reviews include The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings, in the Los Angeles Times, and Stephen King’s Finders Keepers for the Washington Post.

Labor Poetic Labor! 2Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has a new poem available on-line at Essay Press in the second volume of Labor Poetic Labor!. Stephen Motika (Poetry) has written an afterword to this issue.

The New York City premiere of Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera—now has tickets on sale. It will be produced this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with dates now announced and tickets available June 1st for NYMF pass holders and June 15th for the general public. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera will be performed on June 25 at two showcase events: a NYMF Preview at the World Wide Plaza, West 50th and 8th Ave in NYC, 12:00-2:15 p.m. and also a showcase in the Broadway Sessions series at the Laurie Beechman Theater, 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. In addition, there will be a Songwriters’ Showcase for Elizabeth in NYC later in July, details TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but will be at Stonecoast in spirit and hopes to see Stonecoast alums at Rinkside. Check out the coverage in Backstage and Theater Mania. For more info and updates on performances and tickets, visit the show’s website.

Tonya & Nancy The Rock Opera NYMF Logo Hi Res

Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, will feature Stonecoast grad Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) at its eighth annual “Are you a Bookie?” gathering of book clubs and book lovers, June 14, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Admission is free of charge and cake will be served. Elli will be reading from On Hurricane Island, her new novel. Several Stonecoasters are featured in the anthology that will be read from by panelist Nina Gaby, editor of Dumped. The event will include Karen Shepard as keynote speaker. She is the author of The Celestials, an historical novel inspired by the true story of 75 Chinese laborers brought to North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1870 to break a strike at a shoe factory. Emcee will be Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), the university’s writer in residence and director of its writing program. All authors’ books will be available for sale and signing.

CONFERENCES

DSC_5904There is still space for writers to enroll at Iota: Short Prose Conference! Started by alum Penny Guisinger as a third semester project, Iota is now in its third year of offering high-quality writing instruction in short fiction, essays, prose poems, and all things flash and micro. You define “short”—it’s anything shorter than “long.” This year’s dates are July 23-26, and faculty are Richard Hoffman and Sarah Einstein. Come spend a long weekend writing short forms in Downeast Maine!

charles and sue-iotaCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Interested in writing for the Stonecoast Community blog? We’re looking for all types of essays from alumni, students, and faculty about creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, film, writing, MFAs, post-MFA, interviews, etc. Please contact Robert E. Stutts if you have something you’d like to share.

 

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Community News & Updates March 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is pleased to announce her story “The Scarlet Cloak” will be reprinted in Life After Ashes, an anthology published by Alliteration Ink to benefit a military family who lost everything in a fire.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S ’11) will be on panel at the Astro Blackness 2 Conference, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA.

Atro Blackness 2 Conference

xiii_webJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Pretty Little Boxes” is now available in the Resurrection House anthology XIII edited by Mark Teppo.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) has recently sung the US and Canadian anthems at UMaine men’s and women’s hockey and basketball games, and will sing them again at the opening ceremonies for US National Alpine Skiing Championships next month at Sugarloaf USA. Currently he’s playing the part of Harvey in Harvey’s Dream, a short film based on the Stephen King story of the same name being filmed in Bangor. He will be reading at the Poetry & Science Reading on Sunday, March 22, at 1:00 p.m. at The Rock & Art Shop, 38 Central St. in downtown Bangor, and again at the annual Poet’s Speak on April 4th in Bangor. He would also ask that anyone who has recently published a book that deals with sports—in the broadest sense—consider sending a copy for possible discussion on his weekly Sports Lit 101 segment on the Downtown with Rich Kimball Show heard in Eastern and Central Maine on WZON 620 AM on Wednesday at approximately 4:35 p.m. The station is also available on the web and on the free WZON app.

Tamie Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12; formerly Tamie Harkins) won second place for her essay “David the Green Dragon Goes to the Opera” in the Literal Latte essay competition. The essay can be read online here.

Gina Troisi (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) is happy to announce that her essay, “The Angle of Flickering Light,” was recently published in Fourth Genre‘s Spring 2015 issue (17.1). Her email is ginatroisi@yahoo.com.

Dumped coverThe anthology Dumped: Stories of Women Unfriending Women is now available! This anthology, edited by Nina Gaby, contains the work of twenty-five women writers, including six Stonecoast students, alumnae, and faculty. The book explores “the fragile, sometimes humorous, and often unfathomable nature of lost friendship.” Stonecoasters included in the book are: Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13), Kristabelle Munson (Fiction), Alexis Paige (Creative Nonfiction, S’14), Judith Podell (Fiction, ’06), Julie L. Vandekreke (Creative Nonfiction, S’10), and faculty member Elizabeth Searle. A selection of the SC contributors to the anthology will participate in a reading at the summer 2015 residency with books available for purchase. To hear editor Nina Gaby interviewed about the book on ListenUP! Talk Radio, click here.

STUDENTS

Kristabelle Munson (Fiction) won the title of The Flash at the Boskone Flash Fiction Slam. Kristabelle took first place and was invited to compete at the New Hampshire Institute of Art for the NH Writers’ Project Three-Minute Fiction Slam.

FACULTY

German The Sacred Band CoverBlanvalet will publish the German edition of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) final Acacia novel, The Sacred Band (Reiche Ernte), on March 16th.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) served as a judge for the Bethesda Magazine Fiction Contest.  Also, his Stonecoast-themed essay “How a Gay Guy from the City Found his Inner Rugged Country Boy in Snowy Maine” appeared on Matador.

On Wednesday, March 4th, at 7:30 p.m., The Provincetown Theater (238 Bradford Street, Provincetown, MA 02657 | 508-487-7487) will present a staged reading of Mike Kimball‘s play Best Enemies, the story two cowboys, lone survivors of a sabotaged rodeo cruise, who are marooned together on a tiny desert island. To preserve their sanity, they’ve invented imaginary geography and instituted a system of laws, but ultimately they go to war over their shared cowboy hat. As they rob each other of food and sleep, and their carefully constructed universe begins to unravel, each man faces his death and, in so doing, each begins examining his life. The Portland Phoenix called it “A sly, haunting, and remarkably fun new existential comedy.”

Scene from Best Enemies.

Scene from Best Enemies.

Poetry faculty members Eléna Rivera and Stephen Motika read in San Francisco March 22, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. at CCA Writers Studio, co-presented by the Poetry Center. The reading is a celebration of the work of Kathleen Fraser on her 80th birthday with participants including Bev Dahlen, Frances Richard, John Sakkis, Brenda Hillman, Robin Tremblay-McGaw, Linda Russo, Brian Teare, Latasha Diggs, Eléna Rivera, Lauren Shufran, Stephen Motika, and Susan Gevirtz. Also, Eléna reads in New York on Wednesday, March 25, 2015, as part of “Collection Processed by Poets: Five Writers Respond to the Wagner Labor Archive”; other poets reading are John Keene, Robert Fitterman, Paolo Javier, and Johannah Rodgers. The reading is at the Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University, Bobst Library, 10th floor. The event is co-sponsored by Nightboat Books.

Mags Riordan, the subject of Suzanne Strempek Shea’s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) book This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both, is returning to New England in March for two weeks of talks. Riordan, a native of Ireland, ten years ago founded The Billy Riordan Memorial Clinic in Cape Maclear, Malawi, in memory of her son who drowned in Lake Malawi in 1999. The former high school guidance counselor now lives in the African nation and runs the clinic that has served more than 275,000 people in an area that previously had one doctor for 800,000 people. Since its publication last year, This Is Paradise has been featured in publications in the U.S. and Ireland, including the Boston Globe, Yankee magazine and The Irish Times. Copies of This Is Paradise and Shea’s ten other books will be available for sale and signing at all events, which are open to the public free of charge. Crafts from Cape Maclear also will be sold to benefit the clinic. Kelly’s Books to Go will be selling at both Maine events, so stop by and say hi to Kelly, too. The schedule:

March 19, 7:30 p.m., Cheshire United Methodist Church, 205 Academy Road, Cheshire, CT.
March 23, 6:00-7:30 p.m., Centerville Public Library, 585 Main St., Centerville, MA.
March 24, 7:00 p.m., Maine Irish Heritage Center, 34 Gray St., Portland, ME
March 25, 12:00-1:00 p.m., Wells Public Library, Route 1, Wells, ME
March 25, 7:00-8:30 p.m., West Springfield Public Library, 11 Main St., West Springfield, MA.
March 26, 7 p.m., Kingston Public Library, 6 Green St., Kingston, MA. With Marianne Leone.
March 27, dinner event, time TBA, Ludlow Country Club, Ludlow, MA.
March 28, 2:00 p.m., Sandwich Public Library, 142 Main St., Sandwich, MA.

For more information, visit www.suzannestrempekshea.com or write the author at sess7(at)comcast.net

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) and Annie Deppe of Co. Galway, Ireland, were the visiting writers last month at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA, where Suzanne Strempek Shea is writer in residence. They spoke to and wrote with classes and gave a reading open to the public, and Ted gave a presentation on “Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous” at the university’s eleventh Writers’ Day, February 14. Taking second prize for longest distance covered to get to Longmeadow was grad Penny Guisinger, who braved several of the many February snowstorms to drive from Lubec, ME, to present a Writers’ Day talk on “You Should Get a Grant for That! Applying for Funding to Support Your Writing—A Nuts and Bolts Approach.” Suzanne sends many thanks to all the Stonecoasters, past and present and including Stonecoast Ireland alums, who attended the events.

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe reunite with Stonecoast grad and Stonecoast Ireland participant Melanie Brooks at Bay  Path University in Longmeadow, MA.

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe reunite with Stonecoast grad and Stonecoast Ireland participant Melanie Brooks at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA.

Penny Guisinger begins her talk at Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day.

Penny Guisinger begins her talk at Bay Path University’s Writers’ Day.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Stonecoast Reviewa journal edited and produced by students at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program, is now accepting submissions of literary fiction, pop fiction, nonfiction and poetry, for their third and fourth issues. Emerging and established writers welcome. (Deadline: APRIL 1st)

 

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