Tag Archives: Baron Wormser

Community News & Updates November 2017

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) is thrilled to announce that her paranormal historical romance Moon Shadow, Book 2 of The Auriano Curse Series, was released over the summer. She worked on part of this manuscript while at Stonecoast. She has also signed a contract for a reprint of her first published book (horrible title to be changed), a historical romance set during the Regency period in England.

Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) is pleased to announce the creation of the Washington County Writers Forum in Oregon. WCWF is a monthly forum for writers of all genres, ages, and experience levels to engage with writing professionals about a wide range of topics. The forum is held on the 1st Thursday of each month (February through December) at Insomnia Coffee Downtown Location at 317 E. Main Street, Hillsboro, OR, from 7:00-8:00 p.m.; admission is $5. WCWF is also an information hub promoting organizations, meetings, conferences and conventions, as well as learning opportunities in the Pacific Northwest that are of interest to writers in Washington County. If you live in the Portland, Oregon, area and are interested in presenting, please contact Elizabeth at ebeechwood@gmail.com or through the website contact page at www.washingtoncountywriters.com. If you have an event in the Pacific Northwest, please let her know so she can share it. Of course, you’re always welcome to attend a forum—no membership is required and all are welcome!

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to announce her novel Swift for the Sun earned an honorable mention in the 2017 Rainbow Awards. Karen recently narrated Sarah Goldman’s “Islands in the Dark” for Escape Pod. Karen’s book chapter “Shirley Jackson and the Fear of Ordinary People” will appear in McFarland Press’s forthcoming Horror Literature: Past and Present, edited by Nicholas Diak and Michele Brittany. Karen is also very much looking forward to seeing Stonecoasters at World Fantasy in San Antonio the first week of November where she will serve as a panelist and moderator on “Paging Doctor Tavener and Carnaki: Occult Detectives Old and Newly Reinvented” with Lisa Tuttle, Jess Nevins, Jaime Lee Moyer.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) has a “Notable Essay” listed in Best American Essays 2017. Her essay “Two Strangers on a Train” was published last year in Jabberwock Review.

J.R. Dawson (Popular Fiction, S’16) has a new short story in the November/December issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. “Marley and Marley” was written for her very last packet at Stonecoast.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) will be featured in an event hosted by the Gallery Of Readers Sunday, November 19th, 4:00 p.m., at Smith College, Seelye Hall 106, Northampton, MA. This reading is celebration of Liz George’s new collection, Glass Teepee. In addition to Julie and Liz’s readings, the artist and illustrator Adell Donaghue will present a selection of her work. The event is free and open to the public.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) e-book The Wild Horse of Haiku: beauty in a changing form is now available on www.amazon.com to purchase. This book is a comprehensive look at the history of haiku and the changes it has undergone since traveling to the West. This is for anyone interested in understanding the breadth of this short form and how it can be a springboard for experimentation in creative writing.

Jeff Kass‘s (Fiction, S’09) debut thriller Takedown is brand new from Fifth Avenue Press in Ann Arbor and available now at Jeff’s author page on Amazon. Here’s the jacket copy:

Ann Arbor: a small city with a big university
A city of cute coffee shops, leftover hippies, hybrid cars, indie bookstores, and craft breweries. A city, above all, that values education.

Or does it?

Jim Harrow has been an Ann Arbor cop for fifteen years. He mostly handles things like stolen cars and fratboy fights, giving him time to coach high school wrestling and help raise his teenage daughters.

But things take a deadly turn the night after the Michigan–Michigan State football game, when a house party ends in a fire. Its single victim is a graduate student with no job, no friends, and no research. What was Sanders Bolgim working on, and why would someone want to kill him for it?

Nothing about the case makes sense, and as Jim traces the events leading to the fire, he uncovers a shady party company, dark money buying for-profit charter schools, and a string of murders stretching back years.

In a town where money and education are always in each other’s pockets, someone is paying a killer to teach the ultimate lesson.

Kass’ debut novel is an astute commentary on the darker side of education reform wrapped in a gripping adventure. Filled with authentic characters, a strong voice, and the perfect portrait of a Midwest college town, Takedown is as sharp and crisp as a football Saturday.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’ 14) is pleased to share that her essay “Variations on Green” is featured in the Political Landscapes issue of About Place Journal. Her essay “Disguise” was also published in the Halloween-themed issue of Barrelhouse.

Ellie O’Leary’s (Poetry, W’17) short story “Annie Doesn’t Get It” appears in the next issue of Boomer Lit Mag.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short story “Merrow” has been published in issue 46 of Crannóg magazine.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is pleased to reveal the cover of her memoir, Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss (University of Nevada Press, May 2018).

An Elder Man, the new short film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W ’07) starring The Monster Squad’s Ryan Lambert, continues its festival run November 17th with another Pacific Northwest screening at the Killer Valley Horror Film Festival in Ashland, Oregon. Jacob will be in attendance for a Q&A and post-film drinks with whoever’s buying. Screening info is here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) The Magicians flash fiction, which won SyFy/Wattpad’s #BattletheBeast contest, has been turned into a digital illustrated short; as a bonus, they used her likeness for the character she created. Watch all five chapters on the SyFy website. Her mythological flash fiction “Liars” appeared in Hobart. Her botanical horror story “The Black Thumb” appears in the anthology Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers Volume Two

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) was a top-20 finalist for the 2017 Killer Nashville Claymore Award. The international competition honors her novel manuscript, “Driving Nelson.”

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be rounding out the first year of the release of Letters from Limbo by returning to her home town. On Saturday, November 10th, at 6:00 p.m., at the Big Blue Marble Bookstore in Philadelphia, she will be reading with former Stonecoast faculty member Baron Wormser, who is launching his new novel Tom o’ Vietnam. The bookstore is located at 551 Carpenter Lane in the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia, PA.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a guest at Virginia’s Fall for the Book Festival, and also appeared at The Potter’s House in DC with JJ Amaworo Wilson. Her recent reviews include Philip Pullman’s La Belle Sauvage and Joe Hill’s Strange Weather for The Washington Post, and Amaworo Wilson’s Damnificadoes, Karin Tidbeck’s Amatka, and Josh Melerman’s Black Mad Wheel for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, as well as an essay on novelist John Crowley for The Los Angeles Times. In November, she will be reading and speaking at Bard College as part of its Innovative Contemporary Fiction Series.

Jim Kelly’s newest story “And No Torment Shall Touch Them” has been published in the current issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, which also includes another installment of his regular column. In “Time Party” he offers some possible explanations of why we have yet to be overrun with tourists from the future. His freebie newsletter Strangeways has launched and subscribers continue to pour (trickle) in.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to be reading in a Stonecoast Community Reading with two star Stonecoast alumni, Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) and Kara Storti (Fiction, S’06), at the Arts at Armory Cafe in Somerville, MA, November 18th at 2:00 p.m., with thanks to Lo Galluccio and Richard Cambridge. On November 8th, in an event sponsored by Arlington Community Education, Elizabeth will lead a panel on “Second Acts” for women in their 40s or beyond who are interested in “changing up” their work lives. Elizabeth will discuss how, after three books of fiction, she began the adventure of writing scripts.  See: http://www.arlingtoncommunityed.org/adult-programs/

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Community News & Updates June 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) drabble about an unfortunate house cat entitled “What Dolls Eat” will appear in The Were-Traveler in late May/early June. She is most pleased the editor called it “damn creepy” in her acceptance letter.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) published a short story “A Song For You” on Motherboard themed from the Donny Hathaway song of the same name and the myth of Orpheus. Her novel Elysium has been placed on the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Honor List and is a Finalist for the Locus Award for Best First Novel.

808_largeJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Re’em Song” is now available in issue 258 of Interzone. Turns out so is Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Doors.” This is almost more fun than one Stonecoast writer can handle—thankfully there are two of them to handle the load.

Hank Garfield (Fiction, S’04) will present a paper entitled “Madmen on the Water: The Golden Globe Singlehanded Sailboat Race of 1968-69 and Robert Stone’s Outerbridge Reach at the annual Sport Literature Association conference June 28 in Johnson City, Tennessee. See Hank’s blog, Slower Traffic, on walking, bicycling and not owning a car, at slowertraffic.net.

Bone SongBunny Goodjohn‘s (Poetry, W’07) first poetry collection, Bone Song, launches at the downtown YWCA in Lynchburg on June 18th at 7:15 p.m. Bone Song won the 2014 Liam Rector Prize and includes a jacket blurb from the rather fabulous Baron Wormser. The collection is available at Amazon; however, signed copies with free positive energy may be ordered from Bunny’s Etsy store.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is proud to announce that her first book, a collection of micro-essays called Postcards from Here, will be released by Vine Leaves Press in 2016. Some pieces from the book have been previously published, and curious people can read online excerpts here and here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Short Nonfiction for her lyric essay “Saudade,” which was first published in The Stonecoast Review. She thanks Review editors Alexandria DelCourt, Alexis Paige, and others for helping to improve the piece. A shorter version was published this month in Hippocampus Magazine and is available here. Earlier this month, Lesley had a review/essay inspired by Los Angeles writer Wendy C. Ortiz’s second memoir, Hollywood Notebook, up on The Rumpus.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a book trailer for his debut poetry collection, Drift.

The High Cost of Flowers by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) won the best literary fiction award and the best contemporary fiction award in the 2014 Midwest Book Awards held April 13. This was the 25th anniversary of the awards with books submitted by independent, small, and academic presses in a twelve-state region. The High Cost of Flowers was released by Calumet Editions.

0615asimovs_smWill Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11) appears in the July 2015 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction with “Acres of Perhaps.”

Mary Heather Noble‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) essay “Reintroduction” is featured in Issue 7: Wilderness of Minerva Rising. She will be participating in the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, this month, and will be working with acclaimed environmental writer Scott Russell Sanders. Mary Heather has also been invited as a writer-in-residence for PLAYA’s “Beyond Creating: A Climate of Change,” an Art + Ecology themed artist retreat that fosters collaboration among artists and scientists around environmental issues. PLAYA is a nonprofit organization based in Summer Lake, Oregon, that supports innovative thinking through work in the arts, literature, natural sciences and other fields of creative inquiry.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction (New Rivers Press)—an annual anthology of the best new fiction from established and emerging writers, edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04)—has just been awarded the Midwest Independent Publishers Association award for Fiction: Short Story/Anthology, the first time an anthology has won the top prize. Former Stonecoast Director Lee Hope is one of the authors in the anthology, and founding faculty member Michael C White was the finalist and prize-awarding judge. He read the submissions blind. Submissions for the 2016 are being accepted through Submittable. Details are available at the New Rivers Press web site.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essay “Your Boyfriend’s Back” appears in the May issue of Front Porch. Lisa will present at HippoCamp 15, Hippocampus Magazine’s creative nonfiction conference in August. A preview of her session is at their blog.

Kara L. Storti’s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Indigo in D-Town, will be released in Spring 2016 by CarolRhoda Lab, a division of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about charming but tortured Phineas “Finn” Walt, a seventeen-year-old drug dealer who develops an unexpected friendship with an 80-year-old addict. Together they harvest and deal an unknown drug that transports the user to a favorite memory after which a “souvenir” appears from the past. The drug “hippo” is miraculous, highly addictive, and threatens to ruin Finn’s life by dredging up horrific childhood memories, tumbling him further into heroin abuse, and involving a psychopathic drug king out for blood.

51K-wdh5TxL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) is honored to have her essay “An Internship at New Rivers Press” included in the 50th Anniversary publication of New Rivers Press titled Paper Camera. This edition is published as a celebration of the enduring quality of the small press in the face of an ever-increasing pressure by other modes of publication in the writing world. The contents are intended to highlight the dynamic range of material considered by New Rivers Press as noteworthy of finding its way into print.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) is the winner of the New Works Competition at Hugo House for a flash fiction story, “Mosaic.” She will read alongside Meg Wolitzer, Justin Torres, and Amelia Gray in Seattle the end of May. Growing a New Tail, Lisa’s debut collection of short fiction, will launch late summer 2015 and in September in Dublin and Galway. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press.

Julie L. Vandekreke‘s (formerly Scharf; Creative Nonfiction, S’10) poem “Transparent” is forthcoming in the June 2015 edition of Mused: Bella Online Literary Review.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her full-length poetry manuscript, Pierce & Brand’s World of Dangerous Wonders, is currently a semifinalist in the 2015 Negative Capability Press Book Competition. In addition, her chapbook manuscript, Imperative, is currently a semifinalist in YesYes Books’ 2015 Vinyl 45s Chapbook Contest.

2015 Negative Capability Press Book CompetitionMarco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has two new pieces out.  His essay, “A House of Swing Doors: This Future Life (Calvatea gigantea)” on mushrooms and mortality, which began and greatly profited from being in a Stonecoast workshop, is in the May issue of DIAGRAM. His piece “Some Rules for Foraging” will appear in the summer issue of Taproot. Marco was also a finalist for the Sumer Literary Seminar Disquiet program in Lisbon and will be participating in the program this summer.

FACULTY

Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) will be telling a story for The Moth, on May 30th, at a sold-out show at Portland’s State Theater. The episode will be broadcast nationally on NPR. His story will be about the brief and wondrous life of Poppins, the cat.

Portuguese The Sacred Band V2The final volume of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) Acacia series comes out this month in Portugal. It’s called Acácia – Vozes da Profecia, and is the sixth book in the series, as the publisher, Saída de Emergência, divided each book into two volumes.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” will be published in the fall issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) recent reviews include The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings, in the Los Angeles Times, and Stephen King’s Finders Keepers for the Washington Post.

Labor Poetic Labor! 2Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has a new poem available on-line at Essay Press in the second volume of Labor Poetic Labor!. Stephen Motika (Poetry) has written an afterword to this issue.

The New York City premiere of Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera—now has tickets on sale. It will be produced this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with dates now announced and tickets available June 1st for NYMF pass holders and June 15th for the general public. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera will be performed on June 25 at two showcase events: a NYMF Preview at the World Wide Plaza, West 50th and 8th Ave in NYC, 12:00-2:15 p.m. and also a showcase in the Broadway Sessions series at the Laurie Beechman Theater, 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. In addition, there will be a Songwriters’ Showcase for Elizabeth in NYC later in July, details TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but will be at Stonecoast in spirit and hopes to see Stonecoast alums at Rinkside. Check out the coverage in Backstage and Theater Mania. For more info and updates on performances and tickets, visit the show’s website.

Tonya & Nancy The Rock Opera NYMF Logo Hi Res

Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, will feature Stonecoast grad Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) at its eighth annual “Are you a Bookie?” gathering of book clubs and book lovers, June 14, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Admission is free of charge and cake will be served. Elli will be reading from On Hurricane Island, her new novel. Several Stonecoasters are featured in the anthology that will be read from by panelist Nina Gaby, editor of Dumped. The event will include Karen Shepard as keynote speaker. She is the author of The Celestials, an historical novel inspired by the true story of 75 Chinese laborers brought to North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1870 to break a strike at a shoe factory. Emcee will be Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), the university’s writer in residence and director of its writing program. All authors’ books will be available for sale and signing.

CONFERENCES

DSC_5904There is still space for writers to enroll at Iota: Short Prose Conference! Started by alum Penny Guisinger as a third semester project, Iota is now in its third year of offering high-quality writing instruction in short fiction, essays, prose poems, and all things flash and micro. You define “short”—it’s anything shorter than “long.” This year’s dates are July 23-26, and faculty are Richard Hoffman and Sarah Einstein. Come spend a long weekend writing short forms in Downeast Maine!

charles and sue-iotaCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Interested in writing for the Stonecoast Community blog? We’re looking for all types of essays from alumni, students, and faculty about creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, film, writing, MFAs, post-MFA, interviews, etc. Please contact Robert E. Stutts if you have something you’d like to share.

 

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Community News & Updates April 2013

ALUMNI NEWS

Faith and MadnessSarah Slagle Arnold‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’05) memoir, Faith and Madness: A Spiritual and Psychological Journey, was published August 1, 2012, by Wipf & Stock’s Cascade Books imprint. The story of growing up with a manic-depressive father and Sarah’s own major depression at age 19 takes place in the Depression years of the 30s and 40s. The department store where Sarah worked only part-time paid for her three-time-a-week therapy, which she believes saved her life, for a year and a half. Receipt of her first royalty check in March was a thrill, Sarah reports, and should be shared with all her mentors at Stonecoast. Look for Faith and Madness at the summer 2013 residence or on Amazon.

A capella ZooJulie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Finding Your Way to the Coast” appears in A capella Zoo‘s best-of, fifth-anniversary edition, entitled Bestiary: The Best of the Inaugural Demi-Decade of A capella Zoo.

Christopher Fisher‘s (Fiction, W’08) novel A History of Stone and Steel will be released in print and available via Amazon.com this month. The novel, which he affectionately calls HOSS, began as his creative thesis at Stonecoast.

The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative, a provider of online poetry workshops created by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11), was profiled in the Co-operative News for World Poetry Day.

trm-teaching-artists

The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative

Jeanette Lynes‘ (Poetry/Fiction ’05) sixth collection of poetry, Archive of the Undressed (Wolsak & Wynn, 2012) has been shortlisted for two Saskatchewan Book Awards:  the Poetry Award and the Saskatoon Book Award.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) recently attended the AWP national conference in Boston and participated in a panel about Low-Res MFA programs as well as the Stonecoast reading at the Boston Public Library. She also attended the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando and read from her story “The Black Feminist’s Guide to Science Fiction Film Editing” (forthcoming, The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasty 2013).

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) has three poems in Calibanonline #11, forthcoming in mid-April 2013.

Mihku Paul (Fiction, S’10) will be participating in a group ekphrasis exhibit at the Yarmouth Memorial Library (Yarmouth, ME) titled Poets Speaking to Silent Works of Art, April 8-May 25. She will contribute a poem to accompany Evelyn Dunphy’s watercolor painting The Embrace, which can be viewed on the YML site.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, ’04) short play Memories of Paradise will be performed as part of the Maine Playwright’s Festival and will appear in the March issue of Aethlon: The Journal of Sports Literature. The play festival runs from April 25-May 5 at the St. Lawrence Arts Center in Portland, ME. Information is availabler here (Stonecaost faculty member Mike Kimball has a play in the festival, too). Also, Bruce will join fellow Stonecoast classmate Marcia Brown in Cape Elizabeth for the May Local Buzz reading on Saturday, May 18, 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) reports that three of his poems—“Possums,” “Sparrows,” and “Toad”—will be part of an exhibition, “Fables of the Eco-Future,” at the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, GA. The exhibit (March 30-June 8), by both visual artists and writers, will feature works either about environmental degradation or its alternative.

My First BeatriceMoon Pie Press published its 70th poetry book, My First Beatrice by David Stankiewicz (Poetry, S’05), recently. Former Stonecoast faculty member Baron Wormser said of David’s collection: “David Stankiewicz’s poetry has a natural depth and balance to it. Degrees of tenderness, ruefulness and the ever-new standbys that are grief and joy intermingle and influence one another so that the complexity of a moment or feeling or place or life is properly honored. The sensibility at work here is at once American in its feeling for how locales speak and European, specifically Polish, in its feeling for the shades and shadows of history. The poems are, above all, shot through with love. The poet’s hand and heart are—as it should be—intimately connected.”

ChristopherWatkins (3)

Christopher Watkins

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “The Clock Hands of a Child” has just appeared in the new issue of The Massachusetts Review. His poem “As If She Has Two Marbles In Her Ears” has just appeared in the new issue of Redivider. Additional details available here.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) invites you to a Reading & Signing for Futuredaze: An Anthology of YA Science Fiction, co-edited by Erin and Hannah Strom-Martin (Popular Fiction, W’09) and published on February 12, 2013.

futuredaze-cover-finalDate: Saturday, April 6
Time: 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Location: Spirit of ’76 Bookstore, 107 Pleasant Street, Marblehead, MA 01945
Young adults will be reading excerpts from Futuredaze at the Spirit of ’76 Bookstore in Marblehead! A reception and book signing with Marblehead resident Erin Underwood, the anthology’s co-editor and publisher, will follow. Students aged 12 to 18 are encouraged to drop off in advance or write a one-paragraph essay at the event on why they like to read science fiction to be entered in a drawing for two signed copies of Futuredaze. More information here.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has a story, “December Bride,” in Marco Polo Arts Magazine. The piece was first drafted at Stonecoast. Two of Tamra’s “bridesmaids” have won second place in competitions sponsored by Charlotte Writers Club: the 2013 Creative Nonfiction Contest and the 2013 Children’s Story Contest.

STUDENT NEWS

Ed Ferrara (Popular Fiction) has just sold his short story “Gig Marks” to the horror podcast Pseudopod. No firm information yet as to when the story will appear, but it could be within the next few months.

A Decent Happiness,” an essay by Alexis A. Paige (Creative Nonfiction), appears in the March issue of Pithead Chapel. Also, she guest blogged during AWP for Brevity Magazine, which plans to feature two of her posts.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction) short story “The Siren” will appear in Strange Horizons on April 15. You can read it for free here.

FACULTY NEWS

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will give a reading at 7:00 p.m. on April 15 at Manchester Community College as part of the Mishi-maya-gat Spoken Word and Music Series. The reading is free and open to the public, and it will be followed by an evening of jazz with Norman Johnson and featured musicians. The address is 903 Main Street, Manchester, CT. More information can be found here.

LiteraryOrange_p090331_02sqNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a busy April. On Saturday, April 6, at 10:30-11:30 a.m., she will participate in The Horror Panel: Dead and Loving It, with a signing following, at Literary Orange: A Celebration of Authors, Readers, and Libraries, to be held at the Irvine Marriott. On April 20, she will sign from 12:00-2:00 p.m. in the Horror Writers Association Booth (#859) at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, held on the campus of the University of Southern California; she will also work in the booth on Saturday. On April 23, she will participate in World Book Night; her book is Fahrenheit 451. And on April 24, Nancy will participate in the Chapman University Pub(lishing) Crawl; students will meet and greet authors and discuss publishing; Stonecoast poetry faculty member Tony Barnstone will also participate.

On April 1st, Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) short play Janey Succumbs to Polar Madness will have a staged reading at Stonecoast alum Emily Young‘s ongoing author series Portland Writes at LFK burger bar (188A State Street, Portland, ME. 207.899.3277). STONECOAST ALERT: Jim Kelly and Emily Young will also be reading! Drinks at 8:00 p.m.; readings at 9:00.  Also, a full production of Mike’s Janey Succumbs to Polar Madness will be staged as part of the 12th annual Maine Playwrights Festival at the St. Lawrence Center for the Arts in Portland, ME, April 25-May 5. See the schedule here.

On April 6, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will read in the Storied Nights reading series, sponsored by the Somerville Arts Council at Bloc 11 Cafe, 11 Bow Street, Somerville, MA, from 7:00-9:00 p.m., along with other authors, storytellers, and host Daniel Gerwetz. On April 22, a New York City showcase of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will be performed, featuring Broadway star Melissa Van Der Schyff as the Mother(s) and directed by Kenny Howard of Broadway Consortium. This NYC showcase is produced by Paul Boghosian and Harborside Films. For more information, check Events on Elizabeth’s website.

CONTESTS

Via Christopher Fisher: Attention novelists: If you’ve complete a book (maybe a NaNoWriMo manuscript you’ve been sitting on and wondering what to do with) and you have considered going indie/self-pub with it, then you need to check this out! The Editorial Department’s contest is free to enter, and the winning manuscript receives a grand-prize book design package worth $2500. If a lack of funds is the only thing keeping you from publishing, then this could be your ticket to having a book in print (and Kindle) and available for sale on Amazon as soon as this October!

Via Bruce Pratt: The American Fiction Prize (The Best Unpublished Short Stories by American Writers). This series, whose first six issues were published by Birch Lane Press/Carol Publishing Group, was called “a must-read collection for all short-fiction enthusiasts” by Booklist. The series moved to New Rivers Press in 1997; editors Alan Davis and Michael White chose previously unpublished stories for inclusion in the first ten volumes. Volumes 11 (2010) and 12 (2012) were edited by Kristen Tsetsi, Bayard Godsave, and Bruce Pratt. Volume 13–set for publication in 2014–is being edited by Bruce Pratt. A well-known writer serves as guest judge, chooses three prizewinners who receive a cash award, and writes the introduction. This year’s judge is Michael White. In 1998, Writer’s Digest chose the series as one of the top fifteen fiction magazines in the United States.

First Prize: $1,000
Second Prize: $500
Third Prize: $250
Entry Fee: $16/story

Previous finalist  judges include Charles Baxter, Ann Beattie, Robert Boswell, Ray Carver, Louise Erdrich, Clint McCown, Antonya Nelson, Josip Novakovich, Joyce Carol Oates, Tim O’Brien, Wallace Stegner, Anne Tyler, and Tobias Wolff.

Contest Guidelines: New Rivers Press will publish approximately twenty short stories in each American Fiction volume, subtitled The Best Unpublished Stories by Emerging Writers. We seek well crafted, character driven literary fiction in any genre with a maximum of 10,000 words per story. Each of the selected story authors will receive national publication and distribution, author discount, and two complimentary copies. $1,750 in prizes will be awarded. ($1,000 for 1st place, $500 for 2nd place, and $250 for 3rd place). The finalist judge for Volume 13 is Michael White. There is a reading fee of $16 for each online submission from Feb. 1 through June 15 at the Submittable website.

Submit electronically or mail entries to

American Fiction Prize
New Rivers Press
1104 7th Ave. S.
Moorhead, MN 56563

Mailed entries must include a cover page with your name, story title, mailing address, and email address. Do not include your name on the pages of the story. Please ensure all stories are typed, double-spaced, and that the title and page number appear on each page. Please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope and an e-mail address.

We welcome multiple entries ($16/story). For entries outside the U.S., please send entry fee in U.S. currency or money order. While we cannot return manuscripts, we will forward a list of the winning stories to any entrant who includes an SASE and we will e-mail contest updates to anyone who provides an active e-mail address. Entrants retain all rights to their stories.

Please e-mail any questions to obdriveway@aol.com

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Via Christopher Fisher: Call for applications: The Editorial Department is looking for an experienced book designer for independent contractor work. See the ad here for details and to apply.

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