Tag Archives: Jeff Kass

Community News & Updates November 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ALUMNI RESIDENCY WORKSHOP: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP IN FICTION AND CREATIVE NONFICTION

This January, Stonecoast is offering a personalized writing experience for our Alumni.  Held in conjunction with the Stonecoast winter residency, Susan Conley will lead workshops that get alums to immerse in their writing within a peer setting again. Participants will generate new work as well as discuss old work. It is our hope that you will get to see your writing from new vantage points and that you’ll leave the residency feeling inspired. The conference fee includes four 2.5 hour workshop sessions, plus full access to all presentations, seminars, readings, pop-up classes, reception, and special events. You’ll also get a one-on-one meeting with New York agent Stephanie Koven.

  • Dates: January 10-January 14, 2020
  • Cost: $650.00 workshop fee, plus room and board (~$750 for 4 nights) or commuter fee ($285). Includes daily lunches and afternoon tea at the Harraseeket Inn.
  • Contact Jenny O’Connell to reserve your spot! There are only 8 slots available, and we expect this workshop to fill quickly.

STONECOAST AT AWP

Do you plan on attending the 2020 AWP conference (March 4-7) in San Antonio? Contact Special Programs Coordinator Jenny O’Connell to be added to the list of attending Stonecoasters! As part of the new Stonecoast WISE (Writing for Inclusion and Social Equity) Initiative, all Stonecoast students, alumni, and faculty are invited to a WISE reading and discussion in San Antonio. Time and location TBD. We hope to see you there!

FACULTY

Tom Coash’s (Scriptwriting) play Thin Air has recently been published by Brooklyn Publishers. His play Raghead will be produced in Bronx, NY, as part of the Urban Waves Festival by the Open Hydrant Theater Company, November 11-17.

John Florio (Creative Nonfiction, Popular Fiction, Writing for Social Change) writes about sports, crime, and social issues. In October, he wrote a feature for ESPN’s The Undefeated: Red Sox’s Raquel Ferreira Breaks Through Baseball’s Glass Ceiling. He also recently signed a two-book YA deal with Macmillan Children’s Group. The first will tell the controversial story of Sacco & Vanzetti, two Italian anarchists wrongly convicted of murder and later executed in Boston, MA.

Aaron Hamburger (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) has been awarded an arts and humanities fellowship from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities for 2020. The award, which supports individual artists who achieve excellence in the arts, was given on the basis of several selections from Aaron’s novel Nirvana Is Here. Also, Aaron will be presenting Nirvana Is Here at the National Press Club Book Fair on November 1st in Washington, DC.

Elizabeth Hand’s (Popular Fiction, Fiction) novel Curious Toys has received rave reviews from The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, The Chicago Review of Books, and CrimeReads, among others, and was named one of the Ten Books You Must Read Now by Oprah Magazine.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction emeritus) has been active in his retirement from Stonecoast. His short story “Selfless” appears in the current issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and is featured in the Asimov’s Spotlight podcast in which Jim reads the story in its entirety. His novelette “Grace’s Family” was published last month in The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2019 Edition. A new standalone novella, King of the Dogs, Queen of the Cats, is forthcoming in January from Subterranean Press in print  and Blackstone Publishing in audio. The novelette “The Boyfriend Experience” will be published in the Twelve Tomorrows anthology from M.I.T. Press this summer, and the story “The Man I Love” is slated for later in 2020 in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. When you read this, Jim will be in in Beijing as a guest of the Chinese government at the fourth annual China Science Fiction Conference (November 2-3), where he will give a presentation on teaching science fiction writers at Stonecoast and other programs.

Robert Levy’s (Popular Fiction) ghost story “The Vault of the Sky, the Face of the Deep” is included in Come Join Us By the Fire, a free audio anthology to celebrate the launch of Nightfire, a new horror imprint from Tor Books. More information about the anthology and the imprint can be found here.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and A Four-Sided Bed, her script in development as a feature film, were featured in the October issue of Imagine Magazine, a longtime publication for the New England Film Community. In other film news: Four-Sided, the short film based on Elizabeth’s novel, won Best Experimental Short and second place as Best Narrative Short in Vegas Movie Awards, and the short film is a Semi-Finalist at Blow-Up: The International Art-House Film Fest, along with having screenings upcoming at festivals in Pittsburgh and Chicago. Elizabeth’s feature script A Four-Sided Bed won Best Dramatic Screenplay at Vegas Movie Awards and was selected for a Best Scenes short reading at the Romance Film Festival.

Imagine Magazine‘s feature article on Elizabeth and A Four-Sided Bed

 

ALUMS

Peter Adrian Behravesh (Popular Fiction, W’18) has accepted a full-time position as an editor for Seven Seas Entertainment, the #1 independently owned manga publisher in North America. He will be at the World Fantasy Convention in L.A. from October 31st to November 3rd, where he will moderate the “Mixing Genres” panel (Friday, November 1st, at 1:00 p.m.) and appear on the “Beyond Castles, Horses and Knights: Non-Eurocentric Fantasy” panel (Saturday, November 2nd, at 12:00 p.m.).

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction faculty) and Debbie Lynn Smith Daughetee (Popular Fiction, S’04) would like to announce that Kymera Press is launching a Kickstarter in January 2020 for their title Mary Shelley Presents. The Kickstarter is to fund the printing of a trade paperback of all four issues (Nancy is the author and Debbie is the publisher). We hope you’ll help support us bringing back the voices of Victorian women horror writers in a unique and artful way.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) has been accepted to present a paper on space Jesuits at this year’s Northeast Modern Language Association conference in Boston (NeMLA). The paper is titled “Glory to the Machine God: Tech-priests as Future Jesuits in the Warhammer 40k Universe” and might be included as part of his PhD thesis on the intersection of science fiction and philosophy. Space Jesuits and Habermas! What a time to be alive.

Zachary Jernigan

Zachary Jernigan (Popular Fiction, W’11) has sold History of the Defeated, a novella, to LGBTQ+-focused publisher Lethe Press. In creative-adjacent news, he’ll also be appearing on the live taping of Nicole Byer’s (Netflix’s Nailed It!) podcast Why Won’t You Date Me? on November 14th at Tempe Improv in Tempe, AZ. Zack can be found on Twitter at @CriticalJams.

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be on the schedule for Windycon, a Chicago area SF convention (November 15-17), as follows:

  • Panel: Commerce in Space Opera — Friday, November 15th, 6:00-7:00 p.m. in Mueller Grand Ballroom G
  • Panel: Ask a Scientist — Saturday, November 16th, 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Lilac C
  • Chicago-SF Book discussion: Ringworld by Larry Niven — Saturday, November 16th, 3:00-4:00 p.m. in ISFiC Suite – Room 1612
  • Writers Workshop Moderator: Sunday — Sunday, November 17th, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in ISFiC Suite – Room 1612
  • Panel: Memorable Space Opera Settings — Sunday, November 17th, 1:00-2:00 p.m. in Mueller Grand Ballroom H

Veda Boyd Jones (Fiction, S’17) has several articles in the 2020 Harris’ Farmer’s Almanac on newsstands now. This year’s Christmas romance novella, The Christmas Parade, is now available on Amazon. Favorable reviews welcome. 🙂

Teacher/Pizza Guy, the new poetry collection by Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09), was recently reviewed by The Ann Arbor Observer. Jeff will be reading on Wednesday, November 6th, at Nicola’s Books in Ann Arbor, MI, and on Wednesday, December 5th, at The White Plains Public Library in White Plains, NY.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) is looking for reviewers for his audiobook Drift, now available on Audible. He has promo codes for review copies (US and UK). Those interested should contact him at alanw.king@gmail.com. Please add “DRIFT Audiobook Review” in the subject line.

Tom MacDonald‘s (Fiction, W’09) short story “Nashua River Floater” will be published next June in Coast to Coast Noir, a crime anthology edited by Paul D. Marks and Andrew McAleer.

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry W’17) has a poem “We Were a Family of Five When I Coughed” in the anthology The Hands We Hold: Poetry Concerning Breast Cancer.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short film Skin Deep, based on her screenplay and directed by Ryan Couldrey, recently won second prize at Port Horror Festival’s short film showcase. Her short film Rialia also premiered at the CineFAM Film Festival, and her short script Vomit Comet was featured in a live staged reading at Toronto Cold Reads.

For the second year running, Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, ‘12) won a journalism award in the annual Writers’ Digest Writing Competition. The first was for “Ginger Takes A Stand: A Life Lived With Polio,” the second “DNA Discoveries: Home Ancestry Tests are Rewriting Family Trees.” (Despite her commitment to finishing the novels she started at Stonecoast, Cynthia still loves writing for magazines.) In addition, Cynthia has had two non-fiction books published recently: The Purple Rose of Chelsea: Jeff Daniels and His Theater and Reach!, a business manual written for meta-franchiser John Rotche.

Two poems, “are you against me Boss” and “it’s dark outside Boss by J. Stephen (Steve) Rhodes (Poetry, W’11), will appear in the forthcoming issue of Christianity and Literature. These poems are part of a new series of psalm-like poems inspired by Maurice Manning’s collection, Bucolics.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) was recently interviewed by Nonfiction Reads. She’d love to see Stonecoast folks at I AM BOOKS, in Boston, on Saturday, November 9th, at 6:00 p.m., when she’s reading along with (fellow Stonecoast alum) Anthony D’Aires (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) and New Hampshire poet/author Jennifer Militello.

Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’06) has co-edited a book to be published this November by Littoral Books called A Dangerous New World: Maine Voices on the Climate Crisis. The book is an anthology of essays and poems by Maine writers on the topic of the climate catastrophe we are facing and can be purchased online, after November 15th, at Littoralbooks.com. On December 8th at 2:00 p.m. at Space, we will hold a publication party, and Kathleen would like to invite the Stonecoast community. Intended both as a work of art and as a call to action, the hope of the editors is that it wakes people to the enormous potential and already arrived losses a fossil fuel dependent world promises and, in the awakening, that people will be moved by their love for this place we call home to act. Kathleen has also had a poem, “Mrs. C and the Social Worker,” published in Cafe Review‘s Fall 30th Anniversary issue.

Darlene Taylor (Fiction, W’17) received an individual artist grant from the DC Commission on Arts and the Humanities. The merit-based grant supports her work as a literary artist during Fiscal Year 2020.

The Killing Moon, a novel written by Allister Timms (Popular Fiction, ’13) during his time at Stonecoast, was published on Halloween by PS Publishing, the UK’s foremost genre publisher.

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2019

ANNOUNCEMENTS

One Voice: Stonecoast’s 2nd Annual Open Mic
May 7th, 2019

Celebrate the greater Stonecoast MFA literary community at our second annual One Voice open-mic event, Tuesday, May 7th, 7:00 p.m. at Oxbow Blending and Bottling in Portland’s East End. Sign up here to share a three-minute reading of your original work. (Space is limited, so reserve your spot now!) Free and open to the public. Oxbow’s locally brewed craft beer will be available for purchase during the event, and there are a number of local dining options nearby. Bring your friends! For more info and to RSVP, click here. Contact Stonecoast MFA Community Outreach Coordinator with questions: Jenny O’Connell at jennifer.a.oconnell@maine.edu.

Call for Submissions: Climate Anthology
Deadline: May 31st
Now it is up to the artists. The scientists have warned us. They have been warning us for fifty years. But we have only 12 years to dramatically reduce our current carbon use before we cross the line into unprecedented climate catastrophe. We—Meghan Sterling and Kathleen Sullivan (Poetry, ’06)—are editing an anthology of Maine poets and essayists whose writing will, we hope, wake us, stir our imaginations both for our global future and our way of life here in Maine. We are looking for writing which helps find language for the fear, guilt, and grief of this moment, and, perhaps, for the hope. Published and unpublished work sought. Littoral Press has agreed to publish the book which we hope will be in Fall, 2019. The voices of youth most welcome. Send one essay (max 1,000 words) or up to three poems to: climateanthology@gmail.com Include a short bio. Deadline is May 31st. Kathleen notes that Stonecoast alums are encouraged to submit even if they don’t live in Maine now.

FACULTY

Tom Coash’s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) play Raghead will be part of the Downtown Urban Arts Festival at the Wild Project NYC, May 9th at 8:00 p.m. His new short play Bubble, Bubble will be part of the fun and fabulous Boston Theater Marathon XXI, Boston, May 19th.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) new novel Nirvana Is Here is being released on May 14th. Readings and events are planned this month in New York, DC, Detroit, Chicago, and Baltimore (and next month in Seattle; San Francisco; Portland, OR; Annapolis; and Portland, ME). Click here for the complete schedule. Be sure to get your copy at your favorite indie bookstore! Aaron’s essay on Kurt Cobain’s gay rights legacy was in The Washington Post. And his piece about “Lessons I Learned in Writing My #MeToo Story” was posted on the Submittable blog.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) is the subject of a feature podcast on This Is Horror, discussing music, folk horror, the English folk tradition and her award-winning novella, Wylding Hall. Her Cass Neary books were recently named as one of the top ten hipster crime novels at CrimeReads, and also among the top eight queer crime novels featuring women at Autostraddle, the world’s most popular lesbian website.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has film script news: she won a 2019 Los Angeles Film Award in April for her screenplay A Four-Sided Bed, adapted by Elizabeth from her novel. In the past month, Elizabeth’s recently completed script has also been chosen as one of two feature film scripts to be presented at the 15th ReelHeART International Film Festival in Toronto, which Elizabeth will attend in July. In addition, the script was named an Official Selection at the Script Summit festival in Las Vegas and a Finalist at the Indie Visions Film Festival as well as in the Los Angeles Film & Script Festival. A Four-Sided Bed is being developed as a feature film by two producers, David Ball (producer on over thirty films including the recent Tag; the award-winning 96 Minutes, starring Evan Ross and Britney Snow; and Yellow) and Amy Carpenter Scott/Creatrix Films (Pitstop). More news coming soon on this film development project. In May, in addition to the Idol Talk theater event (see Tamra Wilson note below), Elizabeth has a second theatrical event in May: she will be a featured Storyteller at the fundraising event Stories I Haven’t Yet Told, an Arlington, MA, fundraiser for RIA House, which “supports women who have experience in the commercial sex trade and its associated exploitation, trafficking and prostitution,” on May 29th at the Regent Theater at 7:00 p.m. For updates, including on Idol Talk onstage, see: http://www.elizabethsearle.net

ALUMS

Jillian Abbott (Popular Fiction, S’04) had two op-eds published in The New York Daily News last month: “Sri Lanka and the Burdens of History” mentions her MFA creative thesis, and “CUNY’s Teachers Get Stiffed” talks about the MFA and life trapped as an adjunct.

Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) is pleased to announce that her short story “Yes, Yes, Yes, We Remember” was published in Third Flatiron’s Hidden Histories Anthology. This is the second story she’s had published that’s set in her fictional world of the Vysoké Tatry—the High Tatra Mountains of Slovakia.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited to be a guest at StokerCon (May 9-12) where she will speak on the panel “Rise of the Pod(cast) People” about her job as Assistant Editor of PseudoPod. She’s also serving on “Writing to Prompts: Prose, Poetry, and Sources of Inspiration.” On Saturday, she’ll be the game master for four authors playing Bedlam Hall, a macabre Victorian role-playing game (think Downton Abbey for horrible people). Come watch us play! It’s guaranteed to be good times. Starting in May, Karen is also teaching a twelve-week online creative writing class for Western Technical College. She welcomes Stonecoasters who want some online teaching experience to pair up with her as mentees. Viva la Stonecoast!

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) has made a good deal for two-books at auction with Tor. Eleusis, the first of the two books, is a stand-alone sequel to her first novel Elysium (Aqueduct Press, 2014) and is due to be published in Summer 2020.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) is attending a two-week residency in Cove Park, Scotland. She will be working on her latest hybrid literary project inspired by cultures in along the North Atlantic Rim.

Penny Guisinger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) latest piece ran at Solstice this month. “Borne Back Ceaselessly” explores her longtime relationship with the work of F. Scott Fitzgerald through the lens of a thing they shared: alcoholism. (Hint: he was dead at 44. Currently, Penny remains not-dead.)

Gail Hovey (Creative Nonfiction, S ’11) is pleased to announce that her story “Lost Change” appears on the Brooklyn Non-Fiction Prize blog. It is an excerpt from her memoir What Goes by the Name of Love. 

Jeff Kass‘ (Fiction, S’09) upcoming new poetry collection Teacher/Pizza Guy is now available for pre-order from Wayne State University Press’ Made in Michigan Series. According to the press release, the book is “a collection of autobiographical poems from the 2016–17 school year in which Kass worked as a full-time English teacher and a part-time director for a literary arts organization and still had to supplement his income by delivering pizzas a few nights a week. In the collection, Kass is unapologetically political without distracting from the poems themselves but rather adds layers and nuances to the fight for the middle class and for educators as a profession.” David Hecker, President of the AFT Michigan Teacher’s Union, adds, “I never really cared for poetry, but I truly loved Kass’s work. He speaks to all of our insecurities and vulnerabilities, giving a voice to what we want to say but rarely do. Yes, teachers are struggling to get by financially and it’s a shame that education is not being made a higher priority in our society. Thank you, Jeff, for opening the door to this conversation in a creative and enriching way.” Poet Ross Gay says, “What a beautiful and moving and funny and un-heroic and angry and tender and honest book of poems about labor, aging, love, and, as Kass says, finding ‘meaning in every ice patch on the sidewalk.’ This book’s heart is enormous. I love it.” Official release of the collection happens on August 26th. Pre-orders are available here.

Lissa Kiernan‘s (Poetry, S’11) book Glass Needles & Goose Quills: Elementary Lessons in Atomic Properties, Nuclear Families, & Radical Poetics (Haley’s) has been selected as a 2018 Gold Nautilus Award Winner in the Lyric Prose category and a 2018 Gold Independent Book Awards Winner in the Cross-Genre category. In her book, Kiernan juxtaposes nuclear plant industry reports, newspaper clippings, and texts of poetics with her own poems and prose.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a short video on his final reading as the Howard County Literary & Poetry Society’s 2018/19 Writer-in-Residence. You can watch it here.

Tom MacDonald (Fiction, W’09) and two other local authors held a panel about their new novels as well as their writing and publishing experiences at the Thayer Public Library in Braintree, MA, on April 27th.

Cristina Perachio (Fiction, S‘14) will have her short story “Hunters” published in the May issue of EPOCH Magazine. She is very pleased to see this story placed in Cornell’s literary magazine as it is one of the stories she originally wrote as part of her Stonecoast application, and it has been workshopped by many fellow Stonecoast students and professors.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) will read at The Busy Bee in Cape Elizabeth, ME, on Saturday, May 25th, at 4:00 p.m. as part of the series curated and hosted by Marcia Brown.

Sean Robinson (Popular Fiction, W’14) is pleased to share that his essay “More than Brothers,” a look at LGBT characters in Harry Potter (hint: there’s only two, sort of), was accepted for the Academic Track at WorldCon this August in Dublin, Ireland. He has also been awarded a grant from the Marion and Jasper Whiting Foundation to spend the month of July in Rome, Italy.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) will be the keynote speaker at the NJ Women Who Write Conference in Madison, NJ in September, and in August at the Hippocamp19 Conference for Creative Nonfiction Writers in Lancaster, PA, she will lead a session on Reading as a Writer and appear on a panel about Writing While Parenting.

Nikki Sambitsky‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’18) essay “Chester Bennington is Dead” was recently selected for publication in The Manifest-Station by founder Jennifer Pastiloff and editor Angela M Giles. The essay uses anaphora as a device to help Nikki deal with the sad and untimely death of Linkin Park’s lead singer, Chester Bennington, to suicide, as well her own clinical depression and suicidal thoughts. Nikki uses unconventional and hybrid forms to help her tackle the deeply difficult and grief-filled issues in her life such as depression, family dysfunction, and her children’s autism. This is the second essay that has been published from her larger essay collection Perseverate, Linger, which has been submitted to PANK and Sarabande Books and is eagerly awaiting a decision. A link to the published essay is forthcoming.

Lisa C. Taylor‘s (Poetry, S’04) 2011 collaborative collection, The Other Side of Longing (with Irish writer Geraldine Mills), was adopted by an Irish Literature class at University of Connecticut for the 2019 spring semester. Both Lisa and Geraldine had a chance to visit the class on April 11th and discuss their summer together in Ireland in 2009. Lisa will be teaching an all-day fiction class for the School of the West in Mancos, Colorado (right near Mesa Verde National Park), on June 15th. Anyone can sign up via this link. Also, Lisa has been chosen as a reader for the Connecticut Author’s Trail; she will be reading at Chaplin Library in Chaplin, CT, on August 12th at 7 p.m.

Faculty member Elizabeth Searle and alumna Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) are heading up a special reading, Idol Talk: A Magical Memory Tour of Teen Idols, on May 10th and 11th at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, Newburyport, MA. Show time is 8:00 p.m. both nights. The reading, featuring dance numbers and readings from Idol Talk, a teen idols anthology that Searle and Wilson co-edited for McFarland Publishing in 2018. Actress Marianne Leone will emcee the fundraiser for Exit Dance Company and Firehouse PAC. Among the Stonecoasters participating are faculty member Suzanne Strempek Shea and the works of several alumnae including Lee J. Kahrs, Kate Kastelein, Michelle Soucy, and Darlene Taylor.

 

 

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Community News & Updates November 2018

ALUMS

Edible Queens, one of 85 “Edible” magazines across the US and Canada, has made Jillian Abbott’s (Fiction, S’04) popular (almost 16K followers) Instagram blog into a column. The blog explores migration, memory, and what the Welsh call Hiraeth, which means “homesickness for a home to which you cannot return, a home which maybe never was; the nostalgia, the yearning, the grief for the lost places of your past” through food. Read her column on Butterfly Cakes here.

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) book The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating is now available in Italian. Marsilio Editore is the publisher for the Italian translation, which launched in late September.

Misconceptions, a musical and part of Allen Baldwin‘s (Scriptwriting, W’17) thesis, will have a three-week run at Footlights Theatre in Falmouth from November 1st through the 17th. Here’s a description: “Penny and Vince have done everything right… so far. Faced with the challenge of infertility, they are now forced to reconsider their relationship and piece together a future that neither of them expected. Misconceptions is an emotional roller-coaster ride through modern relationships and romantic expectations. Irreverent but sincere, honest but hilarious, Misconceptions explores a relationship from the inside-out, as Penny and Vince struggle to stay together, finding their way back to the love that started it all. It’s about what we want from our partners, what we need from our lovers, and how the ugly moments of love can, somehow, bring us closer together.” Tickets available now—see www.thefootlightstheatre.com for more info.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) was interviewed as Assistant Editor with the PseudoPod team on Writing the Rapids. She has also been narrating poetry for Heroic Fantasy Quarterly. Listen to her read Ngo Binh Anh Khoa’s “The Necromancer.” Upcoming: Mary Soon Lee’s “Between Battles.” She’s also been tapped to narrate a short story for HFQ and for Escape Artist’s Cast of Wonders young adult podcast—links forthcoming in a future newsletter. She served as a judge for the Horror Writers Association’s Dark Poetry Scholarship and very much enjoyed reading new poets. All of you should apply for HWA scholarships next year when they open again. Read about them here. She continues to be grateful for Stonecoast, the best decision she ever made.

Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) will be having not one, but two, launch parties for her hybrid memoir Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, published by Burrow Press, both featuring live “space music.” On Sunday, November 4th from 3:00-6:00 p.m., she will be at Waterfall Arts Gallery in Belfast, Maine, with electronic keyboardist Tom Luther. On Saturday, November 10th, she will be at the Lowndes Shakespeare Theater in Orlando, Florida, starting at 7:00 p.m. The program will include Orlando Poet Laureate Susan Lilley (Poetry, ’08) and Interplanetary Acoustic Team. Linda’s long poem, “Northern Run,” is in the current Maine Review, and her poem “Entering the Abandoned Grain Mill at Dusk” will be part of the anthology Balancing Act 2, the second collection of Maine women poets published by Littoral Books. A review of Space Heart will be forthcoming in Forward Review.

Brenda Cooper (Fiction, S’17) is pleased to announce the November 11th release of a collection of stories set in the science-fictional world of her award-winning series that begins with The Silver Ship and the Sea. The collection, Stories of Fremont’s Children, includes old and new stories by Brenda, and new stories by John Pitts and Danielle Ackley-McPhail. It is published through eSpec Books in collaboration with Futuriter.com.

The hardcover edition of Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) debut collection Uncommon Miracles was released by PS Publishing On October 1st: “A grieving man travels through time via car crash. A family of matriarchs collects recipes for the dead. A woman gains an unexpected child in the midst of a bunny apocalypse. An outcast finds work in a magical slaughterhouse. Julie C. Day’s debut collection is rife with dark and twisted tales made beautiful by her gorgeous prose. Melding aspects of Southern Gothic and fabulism, and utilizing the author’s own scientific background, Day’s carefully rendered settings in these eighteen stories are both delightful and unexpected. Whether set in a uniquely altered version of Florida’s Space Coast or a haunted island off the coast of Maine, each story in this collection carries its own brand of meticulous and captivating weirdness. Yet in the end, it is the desperation of the characters that drives these stories forward and their wild obsessions that carry them through to the end. It is Day’s clear-eyed compassion for the dark recesses of the human heart and her dream-like vision of the physical world that make this collection a standout.”

Renee S. DeCamillis (Popular Fiction, W’ 14) is thrilled to announce that she has signed a book deal with Eraserhead Press and is one of six in their New Bizarro Authors Series. They will be publishing her novella The Bone Cutters, with a planned release in 2019. A bizarro story about the hell of mental illness, the evil hands of drug addiction, and the horror of psych. hospitals. Are you anxious, suicidal, have some anger issues you need to work on, or maybe you have a drug addiction you need to kick? No worries. Once you’ve checked into this psychiatric hospital, you’ll never be the same. Come, have a visit; stay as long as we need you. If you’re fresh, you’re in for one Hell of a ride once you meet The Bone Cutters.

Jess Flarity (Popular Fiction, S’18) is teaching a craft workshop on density at the Sag Harbor Creative Nonfiction Writer’s Conference this November 1st-4th and participating in a panel on publishing. He would like to thank his former mentor Theodora Goss for this workshop’s inspiration as well as everyone who worked on Stonecoast Review‘s Issue No. 9.

Melody Fuller’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) article “Harvest for the World” was published in the October/November 2019 Somm Journal. Here’s an excerpt:

When will there be a harvest for the world?

Today I speak cautiously and write carefully about what is means to be a black woman in white space.  Today I try to make sure I do not offend, demand, scare, dare or call people out for gross conduct, damaging gossip, divisive tactics and for pushing narratives that marginalize, hurt and dismiss those who look like me. I am not doing a good job carrying all of this, while being an industry pioneer who is working to build a table, set agenda and make sure I don’t get loud, pushy or rude.  Well, sometimes being labeled as one or all of those descriptors happens.  Being questioned and judged happens a lot especially when diversity discussions and women’s agendas intersect or are used interchangeably for self-serving and deflective purposes. You know what I mean.

When will there be a harvest for the world?

Clifford Royal Johns (Popular Fiction, W’18) will be on the following panels at Windycon, a Chicago area SF convention (November 9-11):

  • “Chicago SF Book Club: Discussing Shards of Honor and Barrayar by Bujold” — Saturday, November 10th, 1:00-2:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom H
  • “Streaming Services the New Movie/TV studios” — Sunday, November 11th, 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m., Lilac C
  • “Modern Prison Break: Our Need to Escape?_ — Sunday, November 11th, 12:00-1:00 p.m., Grand Ballroom H
  • Cliff will also be moderating a section of the Windycon Writers Workshop on Saturday morning.

Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) has had his second full-length poetry collection Teacher/Pizza Guy accepted for publication by Wayne State University Press for their Made in Michigan Series. The poems chronicle the 2016-2017 school year, during which Jeff worked not only as a full-time high school English teacher and the Director of Literary Arts at Ann Arbor’s Teen Center The Neutral Zone, but also a third job as a pizza delivery driver 2-3 nights a week. Look for the release in August or September of 2019!

On October 17th, Alan King (Poetry, W’13) was a featured performer on WPFW 89.3’s “Live @ 5,” which was part of the stations pledge drive. Learn more.

Alan King reading on WPFW 89.3’s “Live @ 5

Orlando Poet Laureate Susan Lilley (Poetry ’08) and former Belfast Poet Laureate Linda Buckmaster (Creative Nonfiction, S’11) will be reading together at the Burrow Press “Functionally Literate” event on November 10th in Orlando. Linda will be launching her new hybrid memoir from Burrow, Space Heart: A Memoir in Stages, which she started at Stonecoast. Susan’s first full-length poetry collection, The Green Hand of Venus, will be published by Burrow in 2019. They’ll be discussing Poet Laureate life and Satellite Beach, which just happens to be the title of Susan’s first poetry collection and the town where Linda grew up.

Tom MacDonald’s (Fiction, W’09) fourth crime novel, Murder in the Charlestown Bricks, was released October 1st, 2018. This is the fourth book in the Dermot Sparhawk Crime Novel Series. Private investigator Dermot Sparhawk is taking on cases no one else will touch. Born and raised in the Charlestown projects in Boston, Sparhawk fights for the underdog. He calls on his connections and physical skills to keep him from getting killed. He visits Charlestown’s waterfront gill mills and AA halls and travels the Historic Route 66 in search of the truth. And the truth almost kills him.

Catharine H. Murray’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) debut memoir Now You See the Sky will be released in November. On November 7th at 7:00 p.m., Print: A Bookstore (273 Congress Street in Portland) will host the release party. This is the launch book for Gracie Belle, Anne Hood’s imprint with Akashic Books that will focus on topics of Grief and Loss. Kirkus Reviews writes, “Murray’s lucid meditations and living-in-the-moment attitude serve as useful reminders to all of us that life is precious and fleeting and must be enjoyed to the fullest. It’s a simple message but an important one. As much a eulogy as a testament to the joy of life, the book is a heartwarming tale of dealing with life-altering loss. A tender, love-filled story of how one woman dealt with the loss of a young child.” On November 9th, Catharine will be reading with other local authors at Quiet City Books, 97 Lisbon St. in Lewiston at 6:00 p.m. And on November 15th, Murray discusses Now You See the Sky with imprint curator Ann Hood at Books on the Square, 471 Angell Street at 7:00 p.m. This is a Providence launch event for Murray’s memoir.

Jenny O’Connell (Creative Nonfiction, S’17) will read “The Office of the Mayor of Miessi,” her piece about living above the Arctic Circle among the wild gold miners of Finland’s Lemmenjoki National Park, on November 2nd at Longfellow Books for the SLICE Magazine Maine launch. The piece, which details part of Jenny’s solo walking journey across Finland in the footsteps of Lappish legend Petronella van der Moer, is currently out in the Fall/Winter “Flight” edition of SLICE, available here.

Lemmenjoki National Park: Pihlajamäki Cabin, the setting of “The Office of the Mayor of Miessi.”

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) has been invited to read her poetry at The Harrison in King’s Cross, London, as part of Elbow Room’s celebration of its final issue. The party begins at 8:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 3rd. If any Stonecoasters are in London, come on down!

The short-story collection The Trash Detail by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) is available for pre order. Booksellers may contact SPD, while individuals may order from their local bookstore, Amazon, or directly from New Rivers Press by sending an email to Nayt Rundquist at www.newriverspress.com. Bruce’s new chapbook Forms and Shades is due out very soon from Clare Songbird Publishing; they may be contacted at claresongbirdspub.com

They Speak Your Language: A Poetic Bestiary, by J. Stephen Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) and illustrated by Amanda Chao Benbassat, is now available at the Amazon Books website. These poems move back forth from the significant to the silly, with drawings of counter-cultural possums to aristocratic cats.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction S ’08) will be at the BookMark Shoppe in Brooklyn, NY on November 15 to read from her memoir, Starting with Goodbye, along with Lindsay Wong, author of The Woo Woo. Lisa’s guest post “Publishing with a Small (Traditional) or University Press: When it Might be Right for You and Your Book,” appears on the website of the Nonfiction Authors Association. Her teleseminar on the topic aired there in October. Recently, the writing department at New Jersey City University hosted Lisa, who read and spoke to students in memoir writing and women’s studies classes. On November 17th, Lisa will present memoir writing tips at the Holmdel, NJ, Barnes & Noble, and also in November, she will make author visits to libraries in Warren, Hillsborough, and Franklin Township, all in NJ. Event details are listed at her site.

Nikki Sambitsky‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’18) creative nonfiction lyric essay “Penny Drop” will be published in the November edition of Longridge Review. Nikki’s essay links her childhood experiences with that of her 7-year old autistic son’s as they share a swing ride on their favorite amusement park attraction, “The Yo-Yo.” “Penny Drop” is part of Nikki’s essay collection “Perseverate, Linger,” which focuses on her triumphs and trials with her husband and two autistic children.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam (Popular Fiction, S’13) will be interviewed at the November 12 LeVar Burton Reads Live event in Dallas, Texas, where LeVar will read her story “In the City of Martyrs.” Her novelette “The Crow Knight” just came out in Beneath Ceaseless Skies‘ anniversary issue. Her short story “Secret Keeper” has been reprinted in Paula Guran’s The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy & Horror 2018.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “Emigrant Song” has been published by Harpur Palate and can be read in the current issue. Additionally, Christopher has just released his 11th album under his musical moniker “Preacher Boy.” The album is called The Rumble Strip and is now available from Coast Road Records. An enhanced lyric book has been published as a companion to the album, and the collection includes the book-length poem “I-80 Blues: 96 Choruses.” It is available for Kindle, or via the Preacher Boy website as a free PDF download.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) poem “Yet” from Letters from Limbo has been made into a short video, which is available on YouTube and can also be viewed on her website.

Tom Coash‘s (Playwriting, Dramatic Arts) award-winning, full-length play, Veils, will open at Macha Theatre Works in Seattle, WA, on November 30th and run through December 16th. His short play Raghead will be produced by the Black Cat Theatre Company as part of their “Millennials #Offended” festival at the Pleasance Theatre in London on December 19th.

John Florio (Fiction, Pop Fiction, Creative Nonfiction, Young Adult) writes about the intersection of race, politics, and sports for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and The New York Times. His latest piece, “In a Year of Assassinations, an Angry Bob Gibson Pitched His Way Into the Record Books,” was an October feature story for ESPN’s The Undefeated. His YA book, War in the Ring: Joe Louis, Max Schmeling, and the Fight Between Hitler and America, will be released by Macmillan’s Children’s Group in May, 2019.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Fiction, Creative Nonfiction) novel Nirvana is Here is now available for pre-order, either on Amazon or contact your local indie bookstore and tell them to reserve your copy. Release date is May 14, 2019! Also, Aaron gave a talk at the Library of Congress based on his article “Seven Layers of Heaven: How to Make a Jewish Bakery Classic at Home” from Tablet Magazine. His cake, created from his own original recipe, was served and enjoyed by all!

Aaron Hamburger’s talk at the Library of Congress on Seven Layers of Heaven.

Seven Layers of Heaven

On November 1st at 7:00 p.m., Amanda Johnston (Poetry, Writing for Social Change) reads with Dante Micheaux and L. Lamar Wilson in celebration of Stonecoast alum Quenton Baker‘s (Poetry, S’12) exhibit Ballast at the Frye Museum in Seattle, WA. Then on November 2nd at 7:00 p.m., she’ll read with Dante Micheaux, L. Lamar Wilson, Anastacia-Renee and Quenton Baker for A Writers Showcase featuring Cave Canem Poets at the Hugo House in Seattle, WA. And on November 3rd at 10:00 a.m., Amanda’s writing workshop Writing Public Tragedies will be at the Hugo House in Seattle, WA (registration required).

Ballast

Debra Marquart (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Social Change) was invited to perform a set of Bob Dylan songs at the Twin Cities Book Festival on October 13, 2018 to celebrate the publication of the anthology, Visiting Bob: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Bob Dylan, edited by Thom Tammaro and Alan R. Davis (New Rivers Press, 2018). Marquart’s poem, “Dylan’s Lost Years,” is one of the 100 poems included in the anthology. Her poem, “Come November,” was published by Terrain.org: A Journal of Built + Natural Environments for the “Letter to America” series. 28 October 2018. Debra’s essay “Buried Voices,” published as a Story of the Week by Narrative Magazine on June 7, 2018, was selected by Narrative Magazine for a “Top Five Stories of 2017-2018” commendations. Stonecoast fiction writer Morgan Talty was also selected by Narrative for “Top Five Stories” honors! Her micro-essay, “Some Things About That Day,” was anthologized in Short-Form Creative Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology, edited by H.K. Hummel and Stephanie Lenox for Bloomsbury Press, 2018. Also, she delivered a plenary poetry reading entitled “True North” at the Luther College Writers Festival, September 27-28, 2018, in Decorah, Iowa.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Playwriting, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) new CD—Tonya & Nancy: Highlights from the Rock Opera, produced and released by Broadway Records—has drawn strong reviews on Broadway World (“Tonya & Nancy Gets High Marks”) and on Broadway to Vegas, which called the CD in its review “stunningly awesome” and wrote of Elizabeth’s narrative: “The script covers a lot of territory and does so with the artistic skill of an Olympic champion.” The CD can be purchased from Grammy-winning Broadway Records. Updates and more info: http://www.tonyaandnancytherockopera.com

Two readings from late Stonecoast alum Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo’s novel The Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda will be held in New England early this month. Ann Hood, Elizabeth Searle, and Suzanne Strempek Shea, all of whom mentored Elisabeth, a member of the program’s inaugural class, will read from the book at 7:00 p.m. on November 1st at An Unlikely Story in Plainville, MA. Suzanne will join Beth’s friends, fellow alums, and fellow Maine authors Morgan Callan Rogers and Jaed Coffin in a reading at 9:00 p.m. on November 5 at LFK in Portland, ME. Here’s a recent Portland Press-Herald story on Beth and her book. Suzanne will be reading from Idol Talk:  Women Writers on the Teenage Infatuations that Changed Their Lives with fellow faculty member Elizabeth Searle, and fellow Idol Talk contributors Caitlin McCarthy and Lisa Borders November 3rd at 2:00 p.m. at Worcester, MA, Public Library. Elizabeth and Stonecoast alum Tammy Wilson co-edited this major book on major crushes, which has been one of the Top Ten Bestsellers on publisher McFarland’s long list of pop culture books every month since July. There’ll be a special appearance at this event by and idol-themed tunes from Stonecoast’s personal DJ, DJJH.

Suzanne Strempek Shea, Elizabeth Searle and Jaed Coffin at the Portland Book Launch for The Afterlife of Kenzaburo Tsuruda by beloved Stonecoast alum Elisabeth Wilkins Lombardo

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The final 2018 event in the Local Writers Read series will be held on Friday, November 9th, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at Quiet City Books in Lewiston, Maine. Offering multi-genre work organized around the theme of Order/Chaos, the list of readers includes four Stonecoast alumni: Nancy Brown (Fiction, S’08), Josh Gauthier (Popular Fiction, S’17), Catharine Murray (Creative Nonfiction, S’17), and Bill Stauffer (Fiction, W’17). Celebrating writing and community, the event is free and open to the public. Full details can be found on the Facebook event page.

Stonecoast MFA faculty member Elizabeth Hand will be the Guest of Honor at Boskone 56, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention. Boskone takes place in Boston, MA, from February 15-17, 2019, at the Westin Waterfront Hotel. In addition to Liz Hand, Boskone will also feature several Stonecoast faculty members, students, and alumni on the programme, including James Patrick Kelly, Theodora Goss, Robert Redick, Julie C. Day, Erin Roberts, and Erin Underwood. There will be a Stonecoast Community gathering and programming at the con. Memberships are required to attend, and more information is available online at www.boskone.org.

 

 

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Community News & Updates November 2017

ALUMS

Patricia Barletta (Popular Fiction, W ’12) is thrilled to announce that her paranormal historical romance Moon Shadow, Book 2 of The Auriano Curse Series, was released over the summer. She worked on part of this manuscript while at Stonecoast. She has also signed a contract for a reprint of her first published book (horrible title to be changed), a historical romance set during the Regency period in England.

Elizabeth Beechwood (Popular Fiction, S’14) is pleased to announce the creation of the Washington County Writers Forum in Oregon. WCWF is a monthly forum for writers of all genres, ages, and experience levels to engage with writing professionals about a wide range of topics. The forum is held on the 1st Thursday of each month (February through December) at Insomnia Coffee Downtown Location at 317 E. Main Street, Hillsboro, OR, from 7:00-8:00 p.m.; admission is $5. WCWF is also an information hub promoting organizations, meetings, conferences and conventions, as well as learning opportunities in the Pacific Northwest that are of interest to writers in Washington County. If you live in the Portland, Oregon, area and are interested in presenting, please contact Elizabeth at ebeechwood@gmail.com or through the website contact page at www.washingtoncountywriters.com. If you have an event in the Pacific Northwest, please let her know so she can share it. Of course, you’re always welcome to attend a forum—no membership is required and all are welcome!

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is proud to announce her novel Swift for the Sun earned an honorable mention in the 2017 Rainbow Awards. Karen recently narrated Sarah Goldman’s “Islands in the Dark” for Escape Pod. Karen’s book chapter “Shirley Jackson and the Fear of Ordinary People” will appear in McFarland Press’s forthcoming Horror Literature: Past and Present, edited by Nicholas Diak and Michele Brittany. Karen is also very much looking forward to seeing Stonecoasters at World Fantasy in San Antonio the first week of November where she will serve as a panelist and moderator on “Paging Doctor Tavener and Carnaki: Occult Detectives Old and Newly Reinvented” with Lisa Tuttle, Jess Nevins, Jaime Lee Moyer.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) has a “Notable Essay” listed in Best American Essays 2017. Her essay “Two Strangers on a Train” was published last year in Jabberwock Review.

J.R. Dawson (Popular Fiction, S’16) has a new short story in the November/December issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. “Marley and Marley” was written for her very last packet at Stonecoast.

Julie C. Day (Popular Fiction, S’12) will be featured in an event hosted by the Gallery Of Readers Sunday, November 19th, 4:00 p.m., at Smith College, Seelye Hall 106, Northampton, MA. This reading is celebration of Liz George’s new collection, Glass Teepee. In addition to Julie and Liz’s readings, the artist and illustrator Adell Donaghue will present a selection of her work. The event is free and open to the public.

Terri Glass’s (Poetry & Creative Nonfiction, S’13) e-book The Wild Horse of Haiku: beauty in a changing form is now available on www.amazon.com to purchase. This book is a comprehensive look at the history of haiku and the changes it has undergone since traveling to the West. This is for anyone interested in understanding the breadth of this short form and how it can be a springboard for experimentation in creative writing.

Jeff Kass‘s (Fiction, S’09) debut thriller Takedown is brand new from Fifth Avenue Press in Ann Arbor and available now at Jeff’s author page on Amazon. Here’s the jacket copy:

Ann Arbor: a small city with a big university
A city of cute coffee shops, leftover hippies, hybrid cars, indie bookstores, and craft breweries. A city, above all, that values education.

Or does it?

Jim Harrow has been an Ann Arbor cop for fifteen years. He mostly handles things like stolen cars and fratboy fights, giving him time to coach high school wrestling and help raise his teenage daughters.

But things take a deadly turn the night after the Michigan–Michigan State football game, when a house party ends in a fire. Its single victim is a graduate student with no job, no friends, and no research. What was Sanders Bolgim working on, and why would someone want to kill him for it?

Nothing about the case makes sense, and as Jim traces the events leading to the fire, he uncovers a shady party company, dark money buying for-profit charter schools, and a string of murders stretching back years.

In a town where money and education are always in each other’s pockets, someone is paying a killer to teach the ultimate lesson.

Kass’ debut novel is an astute commentary on the darker side of education reform wrapped in a gripping adventure. Filled with authentic characters, a strong voice, and the perfect portrait of a Midwest college town, Takedown is as sharp and crisp as a football Saturday.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’ 14) is pleased to share that her essay “Variations on Green” is featured in the Political Landscapes issue of About Place Journal. Her essay “Disguise” was also published in the Halloween-themed issue of Barrelhouse.

Ellie O’Leary’s (Poetry, W’17) short story “Annie Doesn’t Get It” appears in the next issue of Boomer Lit Mag.

Suri Parmar‘s (Popular Fiction, W’17) short story “Merrow” has been published in issue 46 of Crannóg magazine.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) is pleased to reveal the cover of her memoir, Starting with Goodbye: A Daughter’s Memoir of Love after Loss (University of Nevada Press, May 2018).

An Elder Man, the new short film by Jacob Strunk (Fiction, W ’07) starring The Monster Squad’s Ryan Lambert, continues its festival run November 17th with another Pacific Northwest screening at the Killer Valley Horror Film Festival in Ashland, Oregon. Jacob will be in attendance for a Q&A and post-film drinks with whoever’s buying. Screening info is here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) The Magicians flash fiction, which won SyFy/Wattpad’s #BattletheBeast contest, has been turned into a digital illustrated short; as a bonus, they used her likeness for the character she created. Watch all five chapters on the SyFy website. Her mythological flash fiction “Liars” appeared in Hobart. Her botanical horror story “The Black Thumb” appears in the anthology Road Kill: Texas Horror by Texas Writers Volume Two

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) was a top-20 finalist for the 2017 Killer Nashville Claymore Award. The international competition honors her novel manuscript, “Driving Nelson.”

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be rounding out the first year of the release of Letters from Limbo by returning to her home town. On Saturday, November 10th, at 6:00 p.m., at the Big Blue Marble Bookstore in Philadelphia, she will be reading with former Stonecoast faculty member Baron Wormser, who is launching his new novel Tom o’ Vietnam. The bookstore is located at 551 Carpenter Lane in the Mt. Airy section of Philadelphia, PA.

Elizabeth Hand (Popular Fiction, Fiction) was a guest at Virginia’s Fall for the Book Festival, and also appeared at The Potter’s House in DC with JJ Amaworo Wilson. Her recent reviews include Philip Pullman’s La Belle Sauvage and Joe Hill’s Strange Weather for The Washington Post, and Amaworo Wilson’s Damnificadoes, Karin Tidbeck’s Amatka, and Josh Melerman’s Black Mad Wheel for The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, as well as an essay on novelist John Crowley for The Los Angeles Times. In November, she will be reading and speaking at Bard College as part of its Innovative Contemporary Fiction Series.

Jim Kelly’s newest story “And No Torment Shall Touch Them” has been published in the current issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine, which also includes another installment of his regular column. In “Time Party” he offers some possible explanations of why we have yet to be overrun with tourists from the future. His freebie newsletter Strangeways has launched and subscribers continue to pour (trickle) in.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to be reading in a Stonecoast Community Reading with two star Stonecoast alumni, Anthony D’Aries (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) and Kara Storti (Fiction, S’06), at the Arts at Armory Cafe in Somerville, MA, November 18th at 2:00 p.m., with thanks to Lo Galluccio and Richard Cambridge. On November 8th, in an event sponsored by Arlington Community Education, Elizabeth will lead a panel on “Second Acts” for women in their 40s or beyond who are interested in “changing up” their work lives. Elizabeth will discuss how, after three books of fiction, she began the adventure of writing scripts.  See: http://www.arlingtoncommunityed.org/adult-programs/

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Community News & Updates August 2017

ALUMS

Karen Bovenmyer’s (Popular Fiction, S’13) epic dragon-warrior poem “Fire Lover” will appear in a future issue of Heroic Fantasy Quarterly. Her flash-fiction alien-possession story “Like a Soul,” which first appeared in Stonecoast Review #1, has been reprinted in Descansos: Words from the Wayside, ed. Susannah Carlson (Niles, CA: Darkhouse Books, July 3 2017).

Katie Bryski (Popular Fiction, W’16) is honoured that her story “La Corriveau” has been nominated for the Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic. In addition, she has joined the masthead of Apex Magazine and will commence duties as their podcast producer in September.

Chelsey Everest Eiel (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) is excited to announce the August 1st opening of her newest creative venture, The Common Room.  The Common Room is a store and workshop space located in Philadelphia, where womxn-identified/nonbinary artists can show & sell their work, learn new skillsets, and gather for community events such as writing workshops and art classes. In a world where the arts are increasingly delegitimized and defunded, where women continue to battle inequality and injustice, and where community proves essential to our enduring well-being, The Common Room will be the hub of creative, womxn-driven art and events in the Greater Philadelphia region.

Bridget Eileen (Poetry, W’09)—along with poets Andrew K. Peterson, Gillian Devereux and Suzanne Mercury—are the organizers for this year’s Boston Poetry Marathon, a three-day poetry reading festival held in Cambridge. This year’s Boston Poetry Marathon will take place from Friday, Aug 18th, to Sunday, Aug 20th, at Outpost (186 Hampshire Street in Inman Square, Cambridge), and feature over 100 poets reading for eight minutes each. The now-20 year tradition continues, with Bridget and the other three organizers at the helm for the first time. It’s a great literary event, and all are welcome. Admission is free but donations are welcome to help cover venue costs. This year, several members of the Stonecoast community will be participating, as well. Please come by! Instagram: @bostonpoetrymarathon

Jeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) has taken over as the Assignments Editor for Current Magazine in Ann Arbor. If you have ideas for freelance articles of topical interest (especially locally in Michigan) and/or books you’d like to have reviewed, email him at annarboreditor@adamsstreetpublishing.com.

Matthew Quinn Martin (Popular Fiction, S’10) is excited to report that the feature-film script he co-wrote, Being, begins principal photography next month. Joining the cast—which already features Lance Henriksen (Aliens, Near Dark, Millennium) and Robert John Burke (Stephen King’s Thinner, Law & Order: SVU, Oz)—are rising Saudi Arabian star Ahd (Collateral, Wadjda), who will be making her American film debut, and science fiction icon Ben Browder (Farscape, Stargate: SG1, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2, Arrow, Doctor Who)…along with a host of noted Indie film, TV, and New York Theatre actors (James Patrick NelsonDanielle SkraastadJames St. VincentKaylyn ScardefieldJason IannaconeBrian FoysterEkaterina Sknaria, & Craig Castaldo…AKA Radioman).

Ellie O’Leary (Poetry, W’17) has had an essay published in 3 Nations Anthology, a collection of writings by Abenaki, Atlantic Canadian, and Maine writers; the piece is an excerpt from her third semester project on the poet Elizabeth Bishop. Ellie will also have her poem “This Girl” included in the anthology WAVES: A Confluence of Women’s Voices organized by the A Room of Her Own Foundation.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) will be the Keynote Speaker at the 77th Annual Writers Conference at Ocean Park on August 7th at 7:00 p.m. Other presenters include Stu Kestenbaum, Eric Moulton, Betsy Sholl, Patricia O’Donnell, David Blair, Jensen Beach, and Gibson Fay-Leblanc. For additional information, contact co-director Dr Jim Brosnan at jbrosnan@jwu.edu or by phone at 401 598-1424.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) Gothic murder story “Ghost Town” appears in the latest Black Static. Her SF story “Doors” has been reprinted in Cast of Wonders.

Melanie Viets (Creative Nonfiction, W’17) has an essay featured in Narrative; “Landskein” will run as a Story of the Week in early August.

“Arkteia,” a short story by Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction, S’14), is in the latest issue of See the Elephant magazine; this was the first story she had workshopped at Stonecoast.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Carina Bissett (Popular Fiction) earned an honorable mention from the L. Ron Hubbard Writers of the Future Contest for her story “The Certainty of Silence.” In addition, her “Rappaccini’s Daughter”/”Jack and the Beanstalk” mash-up, “A Seed Planted,” was selected from open submissions for inclusion in the anthology Hath No Fury, which features the work of such notable authors as Seanan McGuire, Nisi Shawl, Delilah S. Dawson, Carol Berg, and Lucy A. Synder; Hath No Fury is scheduled for publication in September 2017. Carina is also working as a guest editor for a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale edition at NonBinary Review.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont (Poetry) will be joining Elizabeth Searle, Cait Johnson, and Cheryl Boyce-Taylor for a celebration of Stonecoast past and present in a reading at the Poetry Barn’s Third Fridays at Woodstock Library reading series at Woodstock Library, 5 Library Lane, Woodstock, NY, on Friday, August 18th, at 6:00 pm.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) sold “Gaslamp: Tampa Bay” to Hardboiled Horror and “The Strange Adventure of Mary Holder” to Gaslight Gothic.

Jim Kelly‘s (Popular Fiction) new novel, Mother Go, was published in July as an audiobook original by Audible.com. It’s also available in audio only on Amazon. By contract there will be a print blackout until 2018, so if you want to find out what Jim has been up to, you’ll have to listen. This is a publishing experiment and Jim is the lab rat; he needs your help! For example if anyone feels like annotating . um . reviewing it on Audible or Amazon, Jim will be in your debt. According to Audible: “Mariska Volochova is the clone of a famed space explorer, but she rejects her mother and her heritage and wants no part of interstellar adventure. But the sweep of interplanetary politics and an affair with a Martian catches Mariska up in a conspiracy to commit a bold theft that will alter the future of space colonization. Mariska must put her life on the line again and again if she is to discover who she is and what her true destiny must be. In his first new novel in more than 20 years, Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Award winner James Patrick Kelly has crafted a hard science techno-thriller that never loses its focus on the conflicted emotional life of Mariska, a true citizen of the posthuman 22nd century.”

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is featured on Women’s Watch on WBZ Radio (Boston; CBS affiliate) in an interview about her book, theater and film projects. The show was broadcast on July 4th and is available online here. In addition to the Poetry Barn reading noted above, Elizabeth will be reading from her novel We Got Him in the BookBreeze series at the Duxbury Public Library in Duxbury, MA, on the Cape on August 2nd at 7:00 p.m. In September, Elizabeth is offering an intensive beginner’s writing workshop at Breena Clarke’s Hobart Village Festival of Women Writers; please visit the website for more info.

 

 

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Community News & Updates October 2014

STONECOAST IN IRELAND

Ted Deppe and Jeanne Marie Beaumont will be the faculty for the Stonecoast in Ireland residency in beautiful Dingle, County Kerry, next summer.  The residency will take place from 8 July to 15 July 2015.  An invitation to apply will be sent out to all students on 1 November 2014 and applications will be accepted until 12 November.  Any questions about the Irish residencies can be sent to Ted at theodore.deppe@maine.edu.

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) is happy to announce the launch of Catwalk, her third mystery from Midnight Ink and her twentieth book, in October. Early reviews have been encouraging, including “Intricate plot and smart characters” from Booklist.

Eric M. Bosarge‘s (Popular Fiction, W ’12) horror story “My Father’s House” will appear in the October issue of Pithy Pages. Subscriptions are now free.

723_largeJulie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Faces Between Us” is now available in the latest issue of Interzone. It started out as a flash piece written for the 2013 Art & Words Show, curated annually by Stonecoast’s own Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam.

Tamie Fields Harkins‘ (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) poem “We Thought We Needed a Boat” and her essay “The Crossing” were both published in the Fall 2014 issue of Connotations, the journal associated with the Island Institute, which hosted Tamie as writer-in-residence in Sitka, Alaska, last April.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) was proud to have her memoir piece “Saudade” published next to a poem by one of her favorite poets, Martin Espada, in the second edition of The Stonecoast Review. Also, her unpublished novel, “The Actor,” was a top five finalist in the 2014 Brighthorse Prize Novel Contest.

Kass My-BeautifulJeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) is proud to announce the release of his first full-length poetry collection My Beautiful Hook-Nosed Beauty Queen Strut Wave from Dzanc Books. The book will be released in Ann Arbor, MI, on Thursday, October 23, at 8:00 p.m. in a reading at The Neutral Zone, and in New York at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 29, in a reading at Greenlight Books in Brooklyn. Stonecoast faculty mentor and National Book Award Finalist Tim Seibles says of Kass’ poetry collection, “These are the poems of many men who grew up in this country bursting at the seams with boyness, who did the best they could to grow into useful men—fathers, teachers, plumbers. Line by line, this book unfolds like a well made movie.” Books will be available for purchase online at  www.dzancbooks.org.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold “Paul and His Son,” an excerpt from an unpublished science fiction novel, to Asimov’s Magazine and the short story “Fox in the Fields” to 3-Lobed Burning Eye.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) will be on a panel, Balancing Commitment and Craft in Political Fiction, at Pace University on November 5, 2014. The panel is sponsored by the New York City chapter of the Women’s National  Book Association and also includes Céline Keating, Marnie Mueller, Elizabeth Nunez, and Tiphanie Yanique.

Janet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) manuscript, “Clutching Lambs,” has been accepted for publication by Negative Capabilities Press.

Cristina Perachio’s (Fiction, S’14) story “Nightstands” was selected as one of the Top 5 Stories of the Year in Narrative magazine for 2013-2014. “Nightstands” was originally selected as a finalist in the Narrative 30 Below Story & Poetry Contest in 2013 and ran as Story of the Week in the Spring of 2014.

Felicity Stone (Creative Nonfiction, ’08) is excited to announce that Narrative magazine has published an excerpt from her memoir Maggie, a project she began at Stonecoast.

TheMessage_Cover-187x300Eugenio Volpe‘s (Fiction, ’05) eBook The Message was recently published by SolsticeLit Books. It’s the story of Adam Zane, a young veteran struggling with PTSD, who copes by shooting hoops and hating NBA hometown traitor Elijah “The Message” Adams. The eBook may be purchased on Amazon or the SolsticeLit Books website.

Marco Wilkinson’s (Poetry, S’13) essay “The Gift of Failure” appears in the Fall 2014 issue of the magazine Taproot.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’10) took second place in the Ruth Moose Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by Charlotte Writers Club. Her piece, “I Hear Music,” was judged by author Ruth Moose herself, a former creative writing faculty member at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Tamra was invited to read her piece at the Charlotte Writers’ September meeting.

STUDENTS

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction) essay titled “Been Haunted” will be published online by Paper Tape Magazine in a series of haunting-themed stories/essays. The relevance to Stonecoast is particular: the essay is based on a conversation with Stonecoast peers on the Blasket Islands during our summer 2014 residency in Dingle, Ireland, with the Deppes.

FACULTY

family framedMichael Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is the recipient of the 2014 John Gassner Memorial Playwriting Award for his play Duck and Cover. The Gassner Award is presented annually by the New England Theatre Conference, “New England’s oldest, largest theatre association.” On October 25th, a staged reading of Duck and Cover will be presented at the NETC Awards Banquet at Westford Regency Inn and Conference Center, 219 Littleton Road, Route 11, Westford, MA, 01886. His play Ghosts of Ocean House runs October 10-26 at The Players’ Ring, 105 Marcy Street, Portsmouth, NH. Early reservations are recommended and can be made at www.playersring.org or by calling the Players’ Ring at (603) 436-8123. Ghosts of Ocean House received the 2006 F. Gary Newton Playwriting Award and was one of three finalists for the 2007 Edgar Award (Mystery Writers of America). The play is a psychological drama about a brother and two sisters who, to inherit their late father’s Victorian seaside mansion, must spend one week for ten years living together harmoniously—or else lose the house to charity. This is their final year, their final week. But the newest family member, a flighty, fragile young bride named Darlene, harbors a dark, mysterious past—as does the quiet old house—and when they come together, ghosts begin awakening.

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Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is the featured author for Under the Covers in the fall newsletter of WriteBoston, an organization that aids teen writers and writing teachers in MA public schools; Elizabeth’s piece is “Ripped from the Headlines and Whipped into Reality Fiction.”

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) will be launching her newest book, the novel Make a Wish But Not For Money, October 8 at 7:00 p.m. at Broadside Bookstore in Northampton, MA. She’ll have many events in October, including two weeks’ worth with Mags Riordan, founder of the Malawian clinic detailed in This Is Paradise, which came out in the spring and which Suzanne will continue to promote through the end of the year. Mags visit with be a rare chance for readers to meet her, as she lives in Malawi. A full schedule of events is available at http://www.suzannestrempekshea.com/index.php?page=upcoming-events#240. Suzanne has just returned from two weeks of promoting This Is Paradise in Mags Riordan’s native Ireland. Readings included one at The King Sitric in Howth, site of the January Stonecoast Ireland residency, and a night at Galway’s Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop during which Stonecoast Ireland Coordinator and Co-Coordinator, Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe, also read. Suzanne and husband Tommy attended Ted’s launch of his collection Beautiful Wheel at the 37th annual Clifden Arts Festival, and Suzanne read at the festival a few days later during a concert featuring Leo Moran and Anthony Thistlethwaite. The festival ended with readings by Paula Meehan and Theo Dorgan, who many in our community will know from the two having been guest lecturers at Stonecoast Ireland. Paula last September was awarded the Chair of Irish Poetry, Professor of Poetry, by President Michael D. Higgins. Big thanks are sent by Suzanne to Aaron Hamburger, who wrote for the Matador Network about Suzanne’s point-of-view decisions in This Is Paradise.

Annie and Ted Deppe with Paula Meehan at center.

Annie and Ted Deppe with Paula Meehan at center.

Ted Deppe signing at his launch of Beautiful Wheel at the Clifden Arts Festival.

Ted Deppe signing at his launch of Beautiful Wheel at the Clifden Arts Festival.

Stonecoast alum Christina Mock, now living in Barcelona, made a surprise visit to former mentor Ted Deppe's reading at the Clifden Arts Festival. Here, she and Ted are snapped by Annie Deppe.

Stonecoast alum Christina Mock, now living in Barcelona, made a surprise visit to former mentor Ted Deppe‘s reading at the Clifden Arts Festival. Here, she and Ted are snapped by Annie Deppe.

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Community News & Updates November 2013

SCRCoverSpace11The first issue of Stonecoast Review, Stonecoast MFA’s new literary publication, has just been released. You can read the issue here or purchase the issue here. About Stonecoast Review:

The Stonecoast Review is an online literary journal edited by students in the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing. We are inspired by the Stonecoast program’s goals: excellence of craft, independence of voice and an acknowledgement of literature’s responsibility in shaping society. Publishing works of Creative Non-Fiction, Fiction, Poetry, and Popular Fiction, we are especially interested in quality writing that embodies our core values of social and environmental justice, cultural awareness, and international perspectives. We seek submissions from a diversity of writers—both published and emerging. If you would like to contact us with any questions or comments, please direct emails to editor@stonecoastreview.com.

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) will be teaching a workshop and giving a reading at the North Carolina Writers’ Network annual conference in Wrightsville Beach, NC, November 15-17.

Anthony D’Aries‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’09) essay “Heart of the City” is a finalist for the Diana Woods Memorial Creative Nonfiction Award. His essay will appear in Antioch MFA program’s literary journal, Lunch Ticket. Below is a video of Anthony reading the essay at Literary Fields, a reading series at the Middlesex Lounge in Cambridge, MA:

Kendall Giles’ (Popular Fiction, W’13) macabre short story “Rebel Yell” is in the anthology Surreal South ’13, edited by Josh Woods and published in Press 53. For more information, please visit Kendall’s blog. His flash fiction story “Here to Help” has been selected to be displayed as a part of the ThinkSmall7 art exhibition at the artspace Gallery @ Plant Zero, Richmond, VA, October-December 2013. ThinkSmall is a biennial international miniature invitational exhibition that challenges artists to produce small-scale work with a maximum dimension of 3″ x 3″, and ThinkSmall7 is in the 7th installment in the series. For more information, please read this blog post.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) has three poems in the current issue of Prime Number Magazine: “To My Husband on the One-Year Anniversary of Our Separation,” “Conversation at Tastee Freeze: Stage Five,” and “Hard to Believe.”

Penny Guisinger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay “Coming Out” (which was a finalist in the 2013 Essay Contest at Fourth Genre) has now formally been accepted for publication at Fourth Genre and will appear in 2014. Also, she will participate in an online reading for the lit mag Under the Gum Tree on November 15th at 9:00 p.m. EST. The event is physically located in Sacramento, CA, but the broadcast will be streamed live for anyone who wants to watch. For more information, visit her website.

41816_119537834768708_605_nJeff Kass (Fiction, S’09) recently had his poem “Elegy for a Sweathog” accepted by The Museum of Americana and his poem “I told the dentist” accepted by Union Station. In addition, Jeff’s Literary Arts Program, The VOLUME Youth Poetry Project, will host the 15th annual Poetry Night in Ann Arbor this November featuring Aaron Samuels and Kim Addonizio. Finally, Jeff’s youth-run Red Beard Press has released Uncommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning and Living, what the press is calling the ultimate collection of contemporary poems for classroom use. It features over 200 poems from 92 poets, including Stonecoast alums Adrienne Wallner, Kaarrie Waarala, and Teresa Scollon, as well as current and past Stonecoast instructors Tim Seibles, Patricia Smith, David Mura, and Lesléa Newman. Information about how to purchase the book and other Red Beard Press titles can be found here.

In October, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) was hired as a creative consultant and writer on the web series The Day Crew, co-created by Jamie Widdoes and Tim O’Donnell. The Day Crew is the sequel to The 4 to 9ers, an original production of Hulu that was the service’s most-watched original programming last year. The Day Crew is the story of four “millennials” dealing with their first years out of college and living on their own.

Ellen Meeropol‘s (Fiction, W’06) second novel, Hurricane Island, has been sold to Red Hen Press for publication in Spring 2015.

Laura Navarre (Popular Fiction, W’11) signed a deal to co-author her first screenplay with writing partner Steven Denlinger. A dark historical adventure set in medieval France with paranormal and romantic elements, this film adaptation of The Execution by Sharon Cramer goes into pre-production in February. Laura and Steven were also contracted to develop at TV pilot for the series. Laura’s sinister twin, diplomat and playgirl Nikki Navarre, is celebrating the print release this month of her sexy spy romance The Russian Temptation with a Facebook Event on November 20. This “Passport to Suspense” party features six award-winning romantic suspense authors who write in exotic settings. Stop by, comment, and help spread the word for more chances to win a new Kindle Paperwhite and other fun prizes!

9780989512534-BorrowedBike-Panepinto-COVER-v1r4-350x525-200x300Three Rooms Press just published Lisa Panepinto‘s (Poetry, W’13) debut poetry collection, On This Borrowed Bike, available here and here.

“Bleat and Sigh, Night,” the second section of Janet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) extended prose poem written in response to Gertrude Stein’s “Tender Buttons,” will be published in Caliban Online, issue 14, coming out in mid-November. “Bleat and Sigh, Night” was inspired by the “Mutton” section of “Tender Buttons.” (The previous section, “Glazed, blind cushion not mercy,” published in Caliban Online #13, which Janet erroneously attributed to “Mutton,” was actually inspired by Stein’s “Roast Beef.”) Janet will be reading poetry with Basil and Martha King at Infinite Well, 123 Court Street, New Haven, CT, on Wednesday, November 13, at 7:30 p.m.

Bruce Pratt (Fiction ’04) will host Rich Kimball on Downtown, a sports entertainment show on 92.9 FM The Ticket for a regular segment called “Sports Lit 101” where he will discuss literary works, novels, stories and story collections, poems and poetry collections that in some way reference sports. For the next few weeks, the segment will be heard at 4:45 Wednesday afternoons. The program is heard on a network of stations across Maine and may be streamed at www.929theticket.com.

sixfold fall 2013 coverKaren Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08) entered a story in Sixfold‘s writer-judged competition. “Something to Tell Henry” made it through three elimination rounds and was published in their Fall 2013 Fiction issue. She recommends Sixfold—the feedback is honest and extensive from each round of writer-judges. Also, she’s grateful to Stonecoasters Lisa Romeo and Linda Sienkiewicz for recently inviting her onto their blogs.

An essay by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), “Not a Shore Thing,” about her reaction to the destruction of the New Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy last fall and her circuitous relationship with the region, appears in bioStories. Lisa recently taught a series of Writing Your Life Stories interactive seminars at several senior living centers in southern New Jersey.

Adrienne S. Wallner‘s (Poetry, W’09) poem “Letter to Lake Michigan” was featured in the Wisconsin DNR Great Lakes Calendar 2013-2014. “Cheers” and “Morning” will be published in the forthcoming edition of Puff Poetry Prose and a Play, and “Never Fell” has been chosen for inclusion in Uncommon Core: Contemporary Poems for Learning and Living by Red Beard Press.

“Fit to Kill,” a story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11), appears in the Fall issue of The Main Street Rag.

STUDENTS

beyond_the_pillars___cover_for_kindleErin Lyn Bodin (Fiction) is thrilled to share that her creative nonfiction essay “Waking Up in the City of Joy” has been selected by guest judge Dan Raffel as an Honorable Mention in Tiferet Journal‘s 2013 Writing Contest. Erin is also honored to have her poem, “Heavy,” selected by guest editor Laila Halaby for the most recent volume of Magnolia: A Journal of Women’s Socially Engaged Literature.

Genevieve Williams’ (Popular Fiction) short story “The Girl Whose Name Means Girl” is in the new anthology Beyond the Pillars from Bibliotheca Alexandria. The book is available in print and e-book format.

FACULTY

Tony Barnstone (Poetry, Translation) has won first place in the CZP/Rannu Fund for Writers of Speculative Poetry Prize. He will publish four books in the next year and a half: a new book of poems titles Beast in the Apartment (Sheep Meadows Press, 2014); a selected poems in Spanish translation titled Buda en llamas (Ediciones El Tucan de Virginia, 2014), translated by Mariano Zaro; Dead and Undead Poems (Everyman, 2014) and Human and Inhuman Monsters Poems (Everyman, 2015), both edited with Michelle Mitchell-Faust.

Jeanne Marie Beaumont‘s (Poetry) poem “A Stein’s Sestina” appears in the new anthology The Incredible Sestina Anthology, edited by Daniel Nestor, and she answers questions about her poem in a short interview on the website. She also has a poem in the latest issue of Harvard Review and appears in the new issue of Warwick Review (UK) in their feature on new poetry from the U.S.

BOMAN DESAI DANCING ABOUT ARCHITECTUREBoman Desai (Fiction) has two bits of news: The first chapter from his novel The Lesbian Man was a joint winner in a competition for First Chapters. You may read it online until December 1st here. Second, he published Dancing About Architecture: A Songwriter’s Guide to the Lennon-McCartney Catalog, which runs through the 162 songs by Lennon and McCartney, tracing the song fingerprints of each songwriter. Most interesting, perhaps, is the origin of “Yesterday,” the only song for which Paul requested sole credit, saying it had blossomed full-blown when he woke from a night’s sleep and no one had anything to do with it but himself. Yoko Ono denied the request, but for the wrong reason. John’s influence on the song is undeniable, the book makes it clear, but Yoko doesn’t know what it is, and Paul McCartney himself may just be amazed. boman@core.com

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be speaking at the Maine College of Art in Portland at 7:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 6, in Osher Hall. Topic: Outsider Artists and the Strange Case of Richard Dadd. On Tuesday, November 12, she’ll speak at the Belfast Free Library, Belfast, Maine, at 6:30 p.m. Topic: Guided by Voices: Reading Aloud and Characterization.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) is appearing at the World Fantasy Convention in Brighton, England, through November 3rd. She’s teaching “Romancing YA” for the Romance Writers of America University, November 4-8. She’ll appear at YALLFest in Charleston, SC, on November 9th and at Atomacon on November 10th. She’ll be doing a reading with James P. Blaylock at Whittier College on November 19, courtesy of fellow Stonecoast faculty member Tony Barnstone (poetry), and she’s tentatively scheduled for Long Beach Comic & Horror Con November 23-24.

Barbara Hurd‘s (Creative Nonfiction) essay “Keys” is one of thirteen essays now short-listed for a major award in Great Britain: the William Hazlitt Prize, which honors “the best essay in the English language, published or unpublished, on any subject.” She was also first runner-up for the Prairie Schooner Creative Nonfiction Contest and a finalist for the 2013 Annie Dillard Award. Those essays will be published in Prairie Schooner and in the Bellingham Review in the spring. All three essays are part of her forthcoming collection Putting an Ear to the Ground.

cov1311lg-250Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) has had two new stories published. The first, titled “The Promise of Space,” was in the September issue of Clarkesworld. In addition to the print version, there is an audio version which features Jim and Clarkesworld‘s Podcast Director Kate Baker doing the readings. “The Promise of Space” is a story told entirely in dialog; a theatrical version will debut in March 2014 as part of the New Hampshire Theatre Project’s Intelligent Theatre Festival in Portsmouth, NH. The second story, “Sing, Pilgrim,” is a flash piece in the November/December issue of The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. The first draft of this story was written at a Stonecoast residency, during one of Jim’s (infamous) flash fiction challenges. Jim has also sold a new story to the online magazine Lightspeed; “Miss Nobody Never Was” will be published in the December issue. Also, Jim will be reading with Mercurio D. Rivera on November 20th at 7:00 p.m. at the KGB Bar (85 East 4th Street just off 2nd Avenue, upstairs) in New York City. The reading will be the latest in the “Fantastic Fiction at KGB” monthly reading series, which began in the late ’90s. Fantastic Fiction is held on the third Wednesday of every month at the famous KGB Bar. Admission is free.

Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is directing the play Red, which will run three weekends, November 1-17, at The Actors Studio of Newburyport, MA. Red, by playwright/screenwriter/director John Logan is the story of abstract-expressionist Mark Rothko, holed up in his New York Studio in 1958-9, painting a group of murals for the exclusive Four Seasons restaurant. He gives orders to his assistant, Ken, as he mixes the paints, makes the frames, and paints the canvases. Ken, however, brashly questions Rothko’s theories of art and his acceding to work on such a commercial project. In 2010 the play won six Tony awards, including Best Play. The Actors Studio is located in The Tannery, 50 Water Street, Mill #1, Suite 5, Newburyport, MA. For reservations, call 978.465.1299 or visit the website.

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Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has a personal essay in a new anthology from Norton: Knitting  Yarns, edited by former Stonecoast faculty Ann Hood and featuring fellow faculty Suzanne Strempek Shea along with writers such as Barbara Kingsolver, Anita Shreve, Andre Dubus III, Elinor Lipman, Ann Patchett, and Jane Smiley. Elizabeth and Suzanne will read from the anthology along with Ann Hood and others at Newtonville Books on November 14; Elizabeth will read from the anthology with others in Wellesley, MA, on November 21 at Wellesley Books. Elizabeth will also be reading “bedtime stories” from her fiction along with Suzanne at a “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun Pajama Party” event sponsored by the Republican Newspaper in Springfield, MA, on November 15 at Delaney House. The event is featured in an article in The Republican and on Mass.Live. Elizabeth is also reading and partying on November 2nd at the Stonecoast Northeast event Lost Lit presents Stonecoast MFA in NYC, hosted by Stonecoast student Kristabelle Munson and featuring Stonecoast students and alumni. The reading is 7:00-8:00 p.m. at Grumpy Bert, 82 Bond Street in Brooklyn. Seating is limited, so RSVP for this event with lynne@lostlit.com.

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