Tag Archives: Paula Treick DeBoard

Community News & Updates September 2016

ALUMS

Bailey_SoundofWildSnail_pbk_jkt_rgb_HRThe paperback edition of Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S‘15) book, The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating, launches September 6th.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Scholarship ($2500 professional development funds) by the Horror Writers Association. She owes her Stonecoast mentors and classmates so very much and is extremely grateful for this honor and opportunity. Her retelling of murderous little-red-riding-hood, “The Scarlet Cloak,” will be reprinted in Burning Willow Press’s Crossroads in the Dark II: Urban Legends anthology this fall and her dark sci-fi novella tribute to Aliens, “Failsafe,” will be reprinted in Manawaker Studio’s Starward Tales II anthology next year. Her undead-grandmother-farm-guardian flash “On Rising One Snowy Evening” appeared in Parsec Inc’s Triangulation: Beneath the Surface Triangulationanthology and is now available for purchase.  Her first novel, a historical piratical romantic LGBT adventure, titled Swift for the Sun, is on schedule for a first quarter 2017 release from DSP Publications. She’s also very excited to announce that she’s sold a flash piece titled “Skin as White as Snow as White as Skin” to Gamut neo-noir magazine some ‘coasters may recognize as inspired by her novel-in-progress The Sleeping Boy, which they helped workshop at residency. She’s thrilled to announce the sale of her poem “Lady of Gold” to Remixt Magazine, especially since it was inspired by a drawing of the same title by Jackson Zorn, a fellow contributor to Stonecoast alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art and Words show. Her lesbian zombie puppeteers vs. terminator robots flash fiction “We Are Still Feeling” will appear in a forthcoming science fiction anthology edited by Stonecoast alumni Cynthia Kraack for Calumet Editions. LONG LIVE STONECOAST!

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “A Pinhole of Light”—which concerns itself with ghost hordes, photography, and transformation—is out in the September/October issue of Black Static. On the podcasting front, episode 116 of Far Fetched Fables and episode 438 of StarshipSofa came out this summer. The first podcast features Julie’s narration of Paul Jessups’s story “Sun Sorrow”; the second includes Julie’s reading of Sunil Patel’s “The Attic of Memories.”

Pinhole

Paula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) has been promoting her novel The Drowning Girls (Mira, 2016) and will be appearing on a thriller writing panel with Kimberly McCreight, Catherine McKenzie, and Emily Bleeker at the Mohegan Sun as part of its Winning Author series on September 30. This summer, Paula spoke on a horror/thriller panel called “Sweet Dreams Aren’t Made of These” at Comic Con with writers Jonathon Maberry and Paul Tremblay. She’ll be featured as part of San Francisco’s LitQuake literary festival on October 15. This fall, she accepted a full-time position as a writing lecturer at the University of California, Merced. More information can be found on her website.

Mohegan Sun advertisement

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) is a contributor to The New Yorker and The Atlantic. His latest piece examines post-Olympic depression, and you can read it here. His next book, One Nation Under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime, will be published by the University of Nebraska Press in Spring 2017; Bob Costas has written the foreword. John is now putting the finishing touches on his latest crime novel, “The Curiously Confounding Case of Revus Apollo.”

Point Blank by Alan KingAlan King’s (Poetry, W’13) book, Point Blank, which he worked on at Stonecoast with Tim Seibles and Joy Harjo, found a publisher: Silver Birch Press, who will publish it November 2016. Folks can learn more about the book at http://bit.do/PointBlank.

Jessica de Koninck (Poetry, W’11) is thrilled to announce that Terrapin Books has released  her full-length poetry collection, Cutting Room. For information on ordering or to see a list of places where she will be reading, go to her website: www.jessicadekoninck.com. Cutting RoomShe’d also love to read at a venue near you and welcomes any suggestions.

Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, W ’06) is pleased to have her essay “Smoke Signals” published in Guernica.

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) will be reading a new as-yet untitled ekphrastic poem as part of Imagistic: 7 Artists, 7 Writers, 7 New Stories, at Hillyer Art Space in Washington, DC, on September 9 at 7:30 p.m. Passehl’s poem is a response to “STC_0002-2 2016-06-08 PFVA” an ethereal infrared photograph of a deer seen in silhouette, by artist Allyson Salomon. The poem interweaves the formal implications of the photograph with imagery, language, and proper names relating to the James River Park area of Virginia, where the photo was taken. In Passehl’s poem, discussion of the meaning, presence or absence of God is bracketed by a brief history of the Charles City County born missionary Lott Cary, and rumination on the fate of the deer. Also: Imagistic is the brainchild of Wales-based writer Carole Burns and artist Paul Edwards, and Passehl participated in a previous Imagistic as a visual artist. This is the first time that she will be one of the featured writers. For more information go the Facebook Event page  or contact Janet at janetpassehl@gmail.com

H is for Hoosier: A State Alphabet, written by Cynthia Furlong Reynolds (Fiction, W’12has been chosen as the official picture book for Indiana schools during the state’s bicentennial year. The book won a Young Hoosier Book Award. Reynolds has completed The Purple Rose of Chelsea, a history chronicling actor Jeff Daniels’ life and the 25th anniversary of the theater he founded in Chelsea, MI, named for the movie he considers his breakthrough from theater to movies. This book is under consideration for a 2016 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), is pleased that Brevity has accepted a narrative essay for its upcoming special issue on race. (Folks, it took six tries to break into this bucket-list pub!) Lisa’s three linked CNF flash pieces, “Funereal,” appear in Issue 2.2 of Change Seven. In July, Hippocampus Magazine ran her narrative essay “The Amazing Technicolor Horse Dream” in their themed issue on “firsts.” Lisa was recently interviewed on the MFA Director’s Blog for Bay Path University, where she teaches in the all-online, all-CNF program.

Richard Squires (Fiction, S’14) is excited to share that a story of his placed second in the Gemini Magazine 2016 Short Story Contest. In addition to publication in the online journal, he won the $100 prize, which officially makes him a Professional Fiction Writer! Thanks to a number of mentors who helped him with this story: Suzanne Strempek Shea, Rick Bass, and Sarah Braunstein. You can read the story here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “Everything Beneath You” has been reprinted in The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Seven. “He Came From a Place of Openness and Truth,” originally in Lightspeed, has been reprinted in Wilde Stories 2016.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Clifford Royal Johns’ (Popular Fiction) storyThe Shooting Gallery will appear as the cover story in the September issue of Mystery Weekly Magazine (which publishes monthly).

Erin Roberts (Popular Fiction) has a short story, “Wolfy Things,” out in audio fantasy magazine PodCastle. The story was workshopped in Erin’s very first residency (thanks Nancy & co!) and can be either listened to or read online. It is her debut publication and bonus story notes can be found on her website.

FACULTY

Harvard ReviewSarah Braunstein (Fiction, Writing for Social Change) has a short story in the current issue of The Harvard Review.

Ted Deppe (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) has three new poems in the online journal Número Cinq. They are included in his new book, Liminal Blue, most easily ordered from Kenny’s Bookshop in Galway, which offers free shipping worldwide.

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Drop City” has just been accepted for publication in a forthcoming Wild Cards mosaic novel, Texas Hold ‘Em, edited by George RR Martin. Publication date is yet to be announced.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Blue Points” will be published in volume five of ImageOutWrite Magazine this fall.

King of Crows IVFor the second time, Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has the honor of having written the best “Worst Play,” a precious adaptation of his literary masterpiece about a drug-addled squirrel and chipmunk in mating season, a 10-minute play so egregious that only one producer in the state of Maine would dare breathe life into it. The play, No One Named Johanna, is only one of a full evening of theatre presented in tasty 10-minute servings that run the gamut from serious drama, to farce, to outrageous comedy, to some that can’t be classified. Each has won the monthly Crowbait Club competition in order to be served up here for you. “King of Crows IV: All Hail The King” will be held at the St Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland, ME, on September 8-10 at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday Sept 11 at 5:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door or ordered online.

Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) interviewed on Rob Mclennan’s blog.

Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will have a six-week run in Chicago, produced by Underscore Theater, starting November 25, 2016; the run was announced in Broadway World, The Chicago Tribune, and more. The Boston Herald featured an interview with Elizabeth in August about Tonya & Nancy as well as her upcoming novel We Got Him (coming out in November) and the feature film development project on her first novel, A Four-Sided Bed.

Tonya & Nancy

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2016

ALUMS

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Woman of Gold (2015) by Jackson Zorn

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) has 7 pieces of exciting news this month.

  1. Her new short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” has been accepted into fellow alumni Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam’s Art & Words Show—Karen is so very excited to participate in the show again!!!!
  2. Also, Karen’s haunted house flash “So Normal and Unwritten” (reprint) is forthcoming in Iron Soap’s 200 CCs on October 7, 2016.
  3. The sad puppies kerfuffle poem Karen mentioned last month, “Keep Hugo Stormed,” is now available for reading (scroll all the way to the bottom) at Eye to the Telescope Magazine. She is still nervous about potential reactions to the poem but as yet has received only positive feedback.
  4. Her epic science fiction novella “Failsafe” (18k word salute to Aliens) will be reprinted in a forthcoming science fiction anthology put out by Onyx Neon Shorts.
  5. A 1250-word “Like a Soul” flash, originally published in The Stonecoast Review, will be reprinted in Centum Press’s first anthology, One Hundred Voices.
  6. She’s going to be an author guest (with Stonecoaster Mur Lafferty) at the GenCon Writer’s Symposium this August, moderating/speaking on seven panels and one critique workshop.
  7. The DSP Publications editing team working on her 27,000-word pirate adventure novella “Swift for the Sun” (coming 1st quarter 2017) have crafted this very cool blurb:

Benjamin Swift imagines himself a smuggler, a gun runner, and an all-around scoundrel. A preacher’s son turned hard-bitten criminal. Sinner extraordinaire. But first and foremost, a survivor.

He’s never considered himself noble.

When Benjamin is shipwrecked on a tropical island, fortune sends an unlikely savior: a blond savage who is everything Benjamin didn’t know he needed. Falling in love with Sun is easy, but pirates have come looking for the remains of Benjamin’s cargo. They find their former slave, Sun, instead.

Held captive by the pirates, Benjamin learns the depths of Sun’s past and the horrors he has been exposed to and forced to perpetrate. Together, they must not only escape, but prevent a shipment of weapons from making its way to rebellious colonists. Benjamin is determined to save the man he loves and ensure their peaceful future together is never threatened again. To succeed might require the unthinkable—an altruistic sacrifice.

Amy Burroughs (Creative Nonfiction, W’16) will have an essay appear in the fall issue of Jabberwock Review. Thanks to the mentors and members of Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s workshop who helped her work on this piece. This is Amy’s first published essay.

Paula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) third novel, The Drowning Girls, was published on April 26 by Mira. It was chosen by Target as an Emerging Authors pick and has received early critical acclaim, including a starred review in Library Journal. She was a recent guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss writing the book. Her first novel, The Mourning Hours (workshopped at Stonecoast and mentored by Suzanne Strempek Shea and Boman Desai), is being rereleased this summer in a mass market format. Paula is a lecturer in writing at the University of California, Merced, and will serve this summer as permanent faculty at Go Deep, a writing and yoga retreat in the Sierra Nevadas.  More information can be found on her website www.paulatreickdeboard.com

In April, Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) was hired by Sony Television International as a consultant in Moscow on Russian adaptations of American television comedies. After a month on The Voronins, the Russian version of Everybody Loves Raymond, he has been assigned to run the writers’ room on Lucky Us, the Russian version of Roseanne. Mike will oversee the writing staff as it prepares outlines and scripts for episodes of the series.

Joe M. McDermott (Popular Fiction, S’11) sold a new science fiction novel called The Fortress at the End of Time to Tor.com.

MagickByMoonriseFinalLaura Navarre‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) award-winning Tudor fallen angel romance Magick By Moonrise was picked up by Harlequin’s worldwide paranormal romance program as a direct-to-consumer release for August 2016, thereby proving again the wisdom of the writer’s adage: “Don’t follow the trends. Write what you love.” Laura’s amazed that it worked. 🙂

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short story, “Sola Fide,” will be featured in the summer issue of Able Muse Review.

Historic Acadia National ParkHistoric Acadia National Park: The Stories Behind One of America’s Great Treasures by Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) has just been published by Lyons Press, part of a series of books in observance of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service in 2016. Schmitt will host a launch party at the Northeast Harbor Library on May 18.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) short story “The Split,” a fantastical fictionalization of her move to Eugene, OR, in 2010, appeared in The Master’s Review. She has also announced the participants in the 2016 Art & Words Collaborative Show she curates annually, which started out as her Stonecoast Third Semester Project, and she was thrilled to see a plethora of Stonecoast alumni in her submissions queue. This year the show will feature alum Shawna Borman and Karen Bovenmyer. For a complete list of participants, click here.

From Joanne Turnbull (Fiction, S’11):

Thanks to the contributions of Stonecoast leaders and alumni, Artists Wielding Words and Images was a huge success. Robin Talbot‘s unassuming grace made it possible for 85 artists, students, and community members to gather and explore the power of art (broadly defined to include written word and visual image) to effect social change. Justin Tussing moderated a panel of writers and photographers who shared challenges of creating work that reflects social issues. Novelist Ellen Meeropol (Fiction, ‘06) discussed the personal journey that led to two novels with themes addressing the emotional impact of political activism. Alumna Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ‘11) and student Jenny O’Connell (‘17) helped to create breakout sessions in which participants experienced ways in which their own creativity might influence social change. Adult artists and the King Fellows (high school students whose creative writing focuses on racism and social justice) facilitated the breakouts. Artists Wielding Words and Images will be the blueprint for ongoing community conversations about art as an agent of social change.

Jennifer Wade (Creative Nonfiction, W’13) is a reader for Creative Nonfiction magazine and its new enterprise, True Story magazine, which will debut this fall, featuring one long form CNF piece each issue.

Ashley Warren (Fiction, S’12) has four poems—“Modern Witchcraft: A Business Meeting,” “Ode to Procrastination,” “Spreadsheet,” and “Symptoms of a Brain Injury”—in an April 2016 issue of Easy Street.

STUDENTS

Mythic DeliriumCarina Bissett‘s (Popular Fiction) poem “Swimming with the Shark Boys” is featured online in the May selections of Mythic Delirium (Issue 2.4).

Ellie O’Leary’s (Poetry) poem “The Ghosts Rondeau in the Granite” will appear in issue 36 of The Northern New England Review. Her poem “The Woods Are Open to Me Now” (a rimas dissolutas) will be in the book The Crafty Poet II: A Portable Workshop by Diane Lockward.

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel, The Risen, about the Spartacus rebellion against ancient Rome will be published on May 3rd, both as a hardback and as an audiobook.

Aaron Hamburger (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) will be teaching at the Peripatetic Writing Workshop this summer, in Woodstock, NY. It’s both a workshop and a writing retreat with lots of opportunities to get extensive feedback, especially for those working on longer projects. Check out their website for more info: http://www.peripateticwritingandart.org/home

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) novel Hard Light has received rave reviews from Maureen Corrigan at The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and the Associated Press, among others. She was featured as part of the Rubin Museum’s Brainwaves Festival in NYC, where she appeared with neuroscientist Dr. Carl Bazil in a conversation about parasomnia, spoke with the A.V. Club’s Jason Heller about her five favorite books on music, and did a reading at the Mysterious Bookshop in NYC. Just announced: she’s co-editing the upcoming issue of the literary magazine Conjunctions with Bradford Morrow. Her essay on Hillary Chute’s Disaster Drawn: Visual Witness, Comics, and Documentary Form appeared in The Boston Review. Recent reviews include Lavie Tidhar’s A Man Lies Dreaming for The Washington Post.

StokerCon-logo-red-whiteNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will participate in StokerCon™, the annual horror conference presented by the Horror Writers Association, at the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas from May 12-15. She will be riding the HWA Los Angles StokerBus, leaving the Iliad Bookstore in North Hollywood on Thursday around 10 AM. There are still seats available! Cost is currently $176 but will decrease with every new rider. Contact Nancy if you are interested. At StokerCon, she will participate in signings, readings, panel discussions, and teaching “How to Write Scary” at Horror University. Her panels include “Screenplay Writing for Authors” with 41dYNQfjMLL-1._SX302_BO1,204,203,200_Jack Ketchum and “The Romance of Horror” with Heather Graham. She will co-present the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel with Goosebumps author R.L. Stine. Also, Fire at Sea, Nancy’s third Beauty and the Beast novel, set in the universe of the CW TV show, will go on sale on May 31.

This month Mike Kimball (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will make his acting debut as comedian Henny Youngman in his short play Henny and Hitler in Hell. The play is part of a collection of seven short plays in a show called Group Synergy. The Actors Studio of Newburyport. The Tannery, Mill #1, Suite 5, Newburyport, MA 01950.

"Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked."

“Hey, some green room. Last joint they put me? So small, the mice were hunchbacked.”

 

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Community News & Updates January 2015

Happy New Year!

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre, S’13) had a lovely December. Her essay “A Question of Corvids,” winner of the 2014 Prime Number Magazine Creative Nonfiction Award, was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and for the Best American Science and Nature Writing anthology. Her novel The Money Bird (Midnight Ink, 2013) is a finalist for the Maxwell Award for Fiction from the Dog Writers Association of America. And her poem “On Eating My Way Through a Feast of Poems” appeared in Minerva Rising, Issue 6: Food. That poem began as an “evaluation” of a class on using food in writing taught by Cait Johnson, Jeanne Marie Beaumont, and Aaron Hamburger at the summer 2012 residency—you never know where the seeds will be planted!

Ed Boyle (Fiction, W’09) had two stories published by on-line journals in November: (1) “Honor Thy Wife” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize and published in Crabfat Literary Magazine. (2) He was the featured fiction writer in Mud Season Review and the story, “Making Weight,” can be viewed here.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Faerie Medicine” was reprinted in the December issue of the online magazine Luna Station Quarterly.

The Fragile World final front coverPaula Treick DeBoard’s (Fiction, S’10) second novel, The Fragile World, was published on October 28 by Harlequin MIRA. She was recently a guest on Capital Public Radio’s Insight with Beth Ruyak to discuss the book. Her first novel The Mourning Hours (June 2013) was a recent finalist for the Housatonic Book Award (info here). Paula would like to give continued thanks to Ted Deppe, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Boman Desai, who mentored her through early drafts of that book. A third novel is scheduled for publication in 2016. More information can be found on her website or on Facebook.

ZombifiedAdam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) book, Zombified, will be available from Kensington books in stores and online later this month. As a promotion for the book’s release, Kensington will also be offering the e-version of his first book, Zomburbia, for just $2.99 across all platforms.

Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14) had two CNF pieces published last month: an untitled essay about a tree, an owl, and a growing boy in the “A Place in Mind” section of the Winter 2014 issue of Northern Woodlands and  “Four Days at Russell Pond,” an account of her family’s first backpacking trip, in issue 19 of TrailGroove. She also read an abridged version of her recently published essay, “Here Be Dragons,” at November’s Local Writers at the Local Buzz event in Cape Elizabeth, ME, alongside novelist Maria Padian and poet Christian Barter.

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) is pleased to announce that her book manuscript, Plumes: On Contamination of Home and Habitat, was selected by Karen Joy Fowler as the winner of the 2014 Siskiyou Prize in New Environmental Literature. The Siskiyou Prize, sponsored by Ashland Creek Press, honors literary works that focus on the environment, animal protection, ecology, and wildlife.  Winners receive a cash prize, an offer of publication from Ashland Creek Press, and a four-week residency at PLAYA near Summer Lake in the Oregon Outback. Plumes was Mary Heather’s Stonecoast thesis.

Anne Britting Oleson‘s (Poetry, W’05) novel, The Book of the Mandolin Player, has been acquired by Bedazzled Ink Publishing Company for their B Ink imprint and will be published in summer 2015. That’s two different books next year, for the 10th anniversary of her Stonecoast graduation!

In September, Passages North ran Alexis Paige’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’14) Stonecoast graduation speech, and later that month she joined Brevity Magazine as assistant editor.

Catherine Schmitt‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) essay “The Coyote Gangs of Hope” is in the current issue of 1966: A Journal of Creative Nonfiction. This piece was improved with the help of Rick Bass and participants in the Summer 2011 nonfiction workshop.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) is the head of programming for Boskone 52, New England’s longest running science fiction and fantasy convention, which takes place in Boston from February 13-15, 2015. There will be a panel titled “Writers on Writing: Talking Plot with Stonecoast MFA Faculty,” featuring faculty members David Anthony Durham, Theodora Goss, Elizabeth Hand, and James Patrick Kelly—moderated by alumna Allison Hartman Adams. Stonecoast faculty and alumni will also be participating in a variety of other panels, readings, and discussions. Boskone is free to the public on Friday the 13th from 2:00-6:00 p.m., and attending memberships are required after 6:00 p.m. on Friday as well as for the duration of the convention. More information about the convention, programming, and weekend/one-day memberships can be found at www.boskone.org

boskone-52-image

CWIsTypingChristopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) new column, “The Bottle & the Pen: An Exploration through Wine and Literature,” debuted on GrapeCollective on December 26, 2014. You can find the column here.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont’s (Poetry) book Letters from Limbo has been accepted for publication by CavanKerry Press.

Stonecoasters who wish to meet or reconnect with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will be interested in two Western Massachusetts appearances next month at Bay Path University, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, MA. Ted and Annie will give a reading open to the public free of charge Thursday, February 12, at 7:00 p.m. at Bay Path University. On Saturday, February 14, at Bay Path’s Writers’ Day, Ted Deppe will give a talk on Taking It All the Way to Coleman’s: On Abandoning the Good for the Marvelous. He will be joined by speakers Charles Coe, on Writing About Those Close to You: The Joys and the Terrors; Bruce DeSilva, on Writing Crime; Penny Guisinger, on Grant Writing; Nell Lake, on How I Went Deep: Writing Intimate Stories About Other People; and Roland Merullo, on The Demons of the Blank Page. For information on registration and fees for Writers’ Day, please write Briana Sitler, at bsiter@baypath.edu

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) has completed his long-delayed historical novel about the Spartacus slave rebellion. It’s off to his publisher, Doubleday, for publication sometime in 2016. Also, Redwave Films has renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story for the twelfth year. The producer, Uberto Pasolini, and director, Alan Taylor, seem more confident than ever that this is the year they’ll be able to move the project forward.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has been been named the new vice president of the Horror Writers Association following the death of president Rocky Wood. She has also been invited to the annual Baker Street Irregulars Sherlock Holmes birthday dinner in New York City, which takes place during the first half of the Stonecoast winter residency. She will be signing In the Company of Sherlock Holmes with her NYT bestselling, Edgar-Award-winning editors Leslie Klinger and Laurie King, as well as Pulitzer-Prize winner Michael Dirda. She is also a Juror for the Shirley Jackson Awards and encourages published horror writers to consider asking their publishers to submit their work. Details are on the website.

James Patrick Kelly’s (Popular Fiction) story “Someday” which originally appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction in April, 2014, has been selected for inclusion in two Best of the Year anthologies: The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year Volume 9, edited by Jonathan Strahan from Solaris Books, and The Year’s Best Science Fiction 32, edited by Gardner Dozois from St. Martin’s Press.

dezart flyerMichael Kimball’s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) play Duck and Cover will run January 30 through February 8 in Palm Springs, CA. On January 22, Mike’s Actual Glass will be performed by The Boiling Point Players, in Houston, TX. Mike did the sound design for The Diary of Anne Frank, running January 9-18 (dates sound familiar?) at The Actors’ Studio of Newburyport, Newburyport, MA.

In 2014, Eléna Rivera‘s (Poetry, Translation) poetry appeared in two new chapbooks: Atmosphered published by Oystercatcher Press, U.K., and Overture published by Metambesen Books. Her poems were also published in the following print and on-line journals: Aethetica Magazine, Creative Writing Annual 2015 Edition, London, UK; Aufgabe 13, Litmus Press; Upstart: A Journal of English Renaissance Studies: Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed; Jacket2, John Taggart feature; The Volta, Trash issue. She has a new book of translation, Parting Movement, Constantly Prevented by Isabelle Baladine Howald, published by Oystercatcher Press, Norfolk, U.K., 2014. She also gave a reading in Paris, France, as part of Thomas Hirschhorn’s art installation, Flamme éternelle, at the Palais de Tokyo.

81---ImageElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) is happy to report that her newest novel, We Got Him, will be published in 2016 by New Rivers Press. NRP is currently celebrating its 40th year in publishing and published Elizabeth’s most recent novel, Girl Held In Home.  Excerpts from We Got Him have appeared as stories in Epoch (story cited in Best American Short Stories), Words & Images, and Michigan Quarterly Review (the story was winner of the Lawrence Foundation Prize).  Details and dates for the novel TBA; visit:www.elizabethsearle.net

Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) has been named to the board of directors of PEN New England, where she joins fellow boardmember and Stonecoast grad Anthony D’AriesPEN is a worldwide association of writers and all who celebrate literature and defend free expression. PEN New England is a branch of PEN American Center and part of International PEN, the world’s oldest international literary and human rights organization. PEN is headquartered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Andrea Lani (Fiction, W’14): The Literary Reflections department of Literary Mama has recently opened submissions for essays that explore the world of literature—reading, writing, working as a writer—from a mother’s perspective. We seek unique approaches and deep reflection on words and motherhood. Please see our submission guidelines and our archives of past essays. Literary Mama is also hiring several editors and assistant editors. This is a wonderful opportunity to be immersed in the production of a high-quality online literary journal among a team of dynamic and caring literary mamas.

From Amanda Pleau (Creative Nonfiction, current):  Call for submissions! Amanda Pleau has been judging a flash fiction competition at MASH Stories. The difference between MASH and most other competitions: no entry fee and they will provide notification of acceptance along with critical feedback and encouragement in almost no time at all. Details at mashstories.com.

 

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Community News & Updates July 2014

ALUMNI

Cal Armistead‘s (Fiction, W’07) debut young adult novel Being Henry David is a winner of the 2014 Paterson Prize for Books for Young People and was named to the Bank Street College “Best Children’s Books of the Year 2014 Edition.” It was also chosen as an “all-school summer read” for Seekonk High School, Seekonk, MA!

Michael Beeman (Fiction, S’09) was happy to see his craft essay “From Inspiration to Print” appear on the Sewanee Review‘s website. The story discussed, written during his first semester at Stonecoast, is available online through Project Muse.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled to announce the publication of three short stories: “What the Dollhouse Said” in Devilfish Review‘s June 28 issue, “The Red Red Rose” in Rose Red Review on July 1, and “What We’ve Lost, Sometimes” in Crossed Genres #19 (July).

Debbie Smith Daughetee (Popular Fiction, S’08) has co-founded Kymera Press, which is dedicated to expanding the role of women in comics: “Our mission is to give women creators and artists of comic books an outlet where they can create women-friendly comics. Our secondary mission is to encourage more women to read and enjoy comics.”

flapperhousesummercovernovaPaula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) recently signed a two-book deal for her third and fourth novels, to be published in 2015 and 2016. More here. She recently attended Book Expo America ’14 to promote The Fragile World, which is released in October. More information can be found on her website or on Facebook.

Julie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Faerie Medicine” is now available in the online magazine Flapperhouse.

17805396A History of Stone and Steel, the debut novel by Christopher Fisher (Fiction, W’08), was honored last month with a Gold Medal in the 2014 Independent Publisher Book Awards (IPPYs). The IPPY Gold Medal is a coveted honor among independent publishers, with this year’s competition receiving over 5,000 entries from the U.S., Canada, and eight countries overseas. Fisher’s award was for first place in the category of “Best Adult Fiction E-book.” A History of Stone and Steel also won a  Gold Medal in the Foreword Reviews “IndieFab” competition in the category of Literary Fiction. The novel, which began as Chris’s creative thesis at Stonecoast, was also honored in three other competitions this spring, receiving a Silver Medal in the 2014 Benjamin Franklin Book Awards, hosted by the Independent Book Publishers Association, as well as “Finalist” status in the Eric Hoffer Book Awards (General Fiction) and the National Indie Excellence Book Awards (Literary Fiction and Book Cover Design—Fiction).

Blind_Moon_AlleyJohn Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has another novel due out August 19th. Blind Moon Alley (Prometheus/Seventh Street Books) is the second in a series of crime novels featuring Jersey Leo, an albino bartender working in an underground speakeasy during Prohibition. The book has already garnered excellent reviews, including a starred review from Publishers Weekly. Find out more at John’s website.

Kristin LaTour‘s (Poetry, S’07) first full-length poetry manuscript, What Will Keep Me Alive, has been accepted for publication by Sundress Publications, forthcoming in October 2015.

Sandra McDonald‘s (Popular Fiction, W’05) story “End of the World Community College” is currently on bookstands in the July/August issue of Fantasy and Science Fiction magazine. Her story about Hollywood and magic scriptwriting, “Story of Our Lives,” recently appeared in Asimov’s magazine, and her YA story “Selfie” appeared in Lightspeed.

Michaela Roessner (Popular Fiction, S’08) was one of several writers invited to provide an ekphrastic piece to accompany images by photomontage artist Viktor Koen for his “Bestiary” series, inspired by classical mythical creatures and deities. The texts will accompany the prints in exhibits around the world. Roessner’s assigned entity was the spirit Mormo, a companion of the goddess Hecate.

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12), managing editor for The Catch: Writings from Downeast Maine, is pleased to announce the release of Volume II, featuring the work of Stonecoast alumna Anne Witty. Stonecoast alumna Linda Buckmaster is also on the Editorial Board for the journal.

Linda K. Sienkiewicz (Fiction, S’09) has signed a contract with BuddhaPuss Ink LLC for the publication of her novelIn the Context of Love (aka The Real Story) for 2014. Details here.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “They Come In Through the Walls” was translated into French for the horror anthology Ténèbres, which is available now for ordering. Her story “The Stink of Horses” is available for free reading on the Hobart webpage. Her story “Scars” was released as a sneak preview of the Flapperhouse summer issue, also featuring fellow Stonecoaster Julie Day and out now in PDF format. Her story “Hero” appears today on Daily Science Fiction.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) work on 4488: A Ridge Blog is a finalist in three categories for this year’s annual Wine Blog Awards, including “Blog Post of the Year” for his post “Beauty Is a Rare Thing: Building the 2012 Monte Bello.”

STUDENTS

Cristina Perachio (Fiction) is heading out with mentor Rick Bass for a road trip from Missoula to Madison for his book project Eating My Heroes. Petrachio and Bass will travel to Tom McGuane’s ranch in Livingston and Lorrie Moore’s home in Madison to cook a “fine meal to say thank you” to Bass’ literary heroes. Perachio will be writing from the road about her experience on her blog, Thank You Gravy.

Bass cooking grilled duck (a trial run for future "thank you meals") in his home in Yaak, MT

Bass cooking grilled duck (a trial run for future “thank you meals”) in his home in Yaak, MT

FACULTY

cover of Beautiful WheelTed Deppe‘s (Poetry, Coordinator of Stonecoast in Ireland) poem “Shouting at the Windows of the Night,” from his new book Beautiful Wheel, has been “highly commended” by the judges of this year’s Forward Prizes for Poetry and will appear this autumn in The Forward Book of Poetry 2015, a collection of the best poems from the UK and Ireland—this is the equivalent of a Pushcart Prize in the U.S. He and his wife Annie Deppe will be reading and teaching at the Strandhill Summerfest in County Sligo this July, and he will give a reading at the Clifden Arts Festival in County Galway on September 25 (where Suzanne Strempek Shea will also be reading). Next spring, Ted and Annie will be at Bay Path College in Massachusetts from 7-15 February, at Trinity Preparatory School in Winter Park, FL, on 5-6 March, and at Randolph College in Lynchburg, VA, from 16 March until 11 April, before they return home to Connemara.

“Just a Juggler,” the first chapter of Boman Desai‘s (Fiction) novel The Elephant Graveyard, placed first in a contest of first chapters and will be posted here until August 1. It is his third win in a welcome hat-trick following his novel The Lesbian Man, which was a finalist for the Dana Award in April, and “The Boy from Chicago,” which placed first in a flash-fiction contest in May and will be posted here until July 1. He is happy to be leaving Stonecoast on a high, but sorry to be leaving at all. He will be glad to hear from you, and should you find yourselves in Chicago he knows a place that serves a biryani to match any in Mumbai. Just ask Mike Langworthy.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “New Neighbor” is in the anthology Law and Disorder.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was visiting lecturer for the Odyssey Writing Workshop June 22-23. She’ll be Master Artist in Residence at the “your word” Teen Creative Writing Residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna Beach, FL, July 19-August 3. Forthcoming Washington Post reviews include Chris Bohjalian’s Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands and Deborah Harkness’s The Book of Life. Her award-winning noir novel Generation Loss has been optioned by the husband & wife producer/director team of Todd Luiso and Sara Koskoff for development as a TV miniseries.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry) has been awarded the Pat Lowther Memorial Award for her book Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway. The Lowther is given annual to a book of poetry by a Canadian woman and carries a $1,000 prize. Previous winners include Karen Solie and Dionne Brand. One of Alexandra’s newer poems, “Watching the Cop Show in Bed,” can be found in the July/August issue of The Walrus Magazine.

Alexandra Oliver with  winners and nominees at the League of Canadian Poets Awards Gala, Toronto, June 7th, 2014.

Alexandra Oliver with winners and nominees at the League of Canadian Poets Awards Gala, Toronto, June 7th, 2014.

Elizabeth Searle judged the New Rivers Press 2014 Book Prize in June, selecting from the finalists a manuscript by Tracy Robert. Elizabeth has an essay, “Reality Fiction,” forthcoming in the New Rivers Press anthology Paper Camera. She also just had a personal essay accepted for a forthcoming anthology from Algonquin Books, edited by Elizabeth Benedict.

Suzanne Strempek Shea will read from her new book This Is Paradise at 7:00 p.m. on July 31 at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA. She also will be leading a fiction workshop at Iota: The Conference of Short Prose August 14-17 on Campobello Island. Other faculty members include Barabara Hurd (essay) and Charles Coe (poetry). For full information and to register, please visit the website.

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Community News & Updates June 2013

ALUMNI

Cal Armistead (Fiction, W’o7) will be a panelist at the sixth annual “Are You a Bookie?” book club gathering June 2nd from 2:00-4:00 p.m. at Bay Path College in Longmeadow, MA. Cal will read from and sign copies of her first novel, the critically acclaimed (most recently by The Boston Globe) Being Henry David, during this event, which is open to the public free of charge and will be headlined by bestselling novelist, memoirist, and columnist Joan Wickersham. Suzanne Strempek Shea, the college’s writer-in-residence, will emcee. Details are here.

Nancy Brown‘s (Fiction, S’08) story “Hay Day” will appear in the book Summer Stories being published later this year. Summer Stories is the result of a collaboration between the Maine Writers & Publishers Alliance (MWPA) and Shanti Arts Publishing. They invited Mainers to write short stories inspired by a series FINAL_cover_EV26of summer-themed paintings by Leslie Anderson. Award-winning Maine author Ron Currie, Jr., selected twelve stories to be published alongside Anderson’s paintings in the book.

Julie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Paradigm Shift” was published in Electric Velocipede 26. The story was originally created as part of Bonnie Stufflebeam‘s annual Arts & Words Show. A second story by Julie, “The Death of Love Project,” came out in the May issue of Swamp Biscuits and Tea.

The Mourning HoursPaula Treick DeBoard (Fiction, S’10) is excited to announce that her novel The Mourning Hours (Harlequin MIRA) will be released on June 25th. She’d especially like to thank the people who worked with her and saw this novel in its various stages of life, including her fellow workshoppers and her mentors Aaron Hamburger, Ted Deppe, Suzanne Strempek Shea, and Boman Desai. More information about the book can be found on her website or on Facebook.

SPM cover 96dpiJohn Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has two books being released this summer. His novel, Sugar Pop Moon, is being released by Prometheus/ Seventh Street Books on July 9th, the first in a series of crime novels featuring Jersey Leo, an albino bartender working in a Hell’s Kitchen speakeasy during Prohibition. John will read from Sugar Pop Moon in Boston and in New York throughout July and August. Event dates will be posted on the novel’s Facebook page. John’s nonfiction book (with Ouisie Shapiro), One Punch from the Promised Land, will be released by Globe Pequot/Lyons Press on September 3rd. One Punch tells the story of boxer-brothers Leon and Michael Spinks and questions the myth surrounding the sport’s heavyweight One Punch Coverchampions in 20th-century America. Information on readings of One Punch will be posted on that book’s Facebook page. Find out more at John’s website.

Marie Hannan-Mandel (Popular Fiction, ’07) has been shortlisted for the Crime Writers Association (UK) Debut Dagger Award for a mystery set in a Brooklyn high school. She worked on this novel during her time at Stonecoast. The winner will be announced in London on July 15th.

“Sexy Robot Mom,” a story about gender and the apocalypse by Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05), won the Asimov‘s Readers’ Award for Best Short Story (tie) along with a cash prize. Visit her here.

Cabildo Quarterly, a poetry broadside, has solicited poems from Bruce Pratt (Fiction, ’04) and will publish “A Friend Speaks” in the fall print issue and “Clapping” and “Getting the Mail” on its website next week. His play Memories of Paradise will be featured in a reading at the 2013 Sport Literature Association Conference in Monmouth, NJ, on June 27th.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “Ballyvaughan” has just appeared in the new issue of Hayden’s Ferry Review. His wine blog, 4488: A Ridge Blog, is a two-category finalist in the 2013 Wine Blog Awards.

A story by Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) appears in the inaugural issue of South Florida Arts Journal. She is also pleased to have her story, “The Bird Watcher,” appear in the 2013 issue of Penumbra, published by the English department at California State University-Stanislaus.

STUDENTS

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction) story “An Exodus of Wings” appeared in Daily Science Fiction on Friday, May 24th.

FACULTY

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “No More Wild Orchids” appears in the spring issue of The Carolina Quarterly.

James Patrick Kelly (Popular Fiction) recently sold three new stories. “Sing, Pilgrim,” the first draft of which was written at Stonecoast as one of his flash-fiction challenges, went to The Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy. “Someday” will be forthcoming from Asimov’s Science Fiction. And in the fastest turnaround in his career, “Soulcatcher,” which he sold to Clarkesworld in late April, was published online on May 1st.

Knitting YarnElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) and Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) are thrilled to have seen the cover of Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting, an anthology edited by Ann Hood that will be published by Norton in November and will include essays by each of them.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Via Bruce Pratt: All Stonecoast Fiction Writers are reminded that the deadline for submissions to the Annual American Fiction Prize are due by June 15. All genres of fiction are welcomed. This series, whose first six issues were published by Birch Lane Press/Carol Publishing Group, was called “a must-read collection for all short-fiction enthusiasts” by Booklist. The series moved to New Rivers Press in 1997; editors Alan Davis and Michael White chose previously unpublished stories for inclusion in the first ten volumes. Volumes 11 (2010) and 12 (2012) were edited by Kristen Tsetsi, Bayard Godsave, and Bruce Pratt. Volume 13–set for publication in 2014–is being edited by Bruce Pratt. A well-known writer serves as guest judge, chooses three prizewinners who receive a cash award, and writes the introduction. This year’s judge is Michael White. In 1998, Writer’s Digest chose the series as one of the top fifteen fiction magazines in the United States.

First Prize: $1,000
Second Prize: $500
Third Prize: $250
Entry Fee: $16/story

Previous finalist  judges include Charles Baxter, Ann Beattie, Robert Boswell, Ray Carver, Louise Erdrich, Clint McCown, Antonya Nelson, Josip Novakovich, Joyce Carol Oates, Tim O’Brien, Wallace Stegner, Anne Tyler, and Tobias Wolff.

Contest Guidelines: New Rivers Press will publish approximately twenty short stories in each American Fiction volume, subtitled The Best Unpublished Stories by Emerging Writers. We seek well crafted, character driven literary fiction in any genre with a maximum of 10,000 words per story. Each of the selected story authors will receive national publication and distribution, author discount, and two complimentary copies. $1,750 in prizes will be awarded. ($1,000 for 1st place, $500 for 2nd place, and $250 for 3rd place). The finalist judge for Volume 13 is Michael White. There is a reading fee of $16 for each online submission from Feb. 1 through June 15 at the Submittable website. Submit electronically.

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