Tag Archives: Nancy Swan

Community News & Updates March 2016

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Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled her flash “What the Dollhouse Said” was chosen as a top ten by Mocha Memoirs Press for their Women in Horror anthology. Furthermore, her poem “Keep Hugo Stormed” will appear in issue 20 of Eye to the Telescope Magazine. Stonecoast is still one of the best things that has ever happened to her and she gives thanks for each of you every day.

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) “The Woman in the Woods”—a story that concerns itself with disasters, orphan trains, and siblings—can be found in the online journal Necessary Fiction. Episode 421 of starshipsofa-logoStarShipSofa also came out in February and features Julie’s narration of Fiona Moore’s story “The Metaphor.”

Elaine R. Flory (Popular Fiction, W’16) has been accepted to and is attending Green Mountain College’s MS in Environmental Studies program with a concentration in Writing and Communications. Living in Jamestown, NY, she is currently seeking a local volunteer position in an environmentally oriented nonprofit organization. Still pursuing creative writing as well, Elaine is looking forward to joining Pennwriters in the spring, and she plans on debuting some of her new eco-fiction at a weekly Pennwriters critique group in nearby Erie, PA.

A review of Two Faint Lines in the Violet (Negative Capability Press) by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S11) was published in the January/February 2016 issue of Women’s Review of Books.

John Christopher Nelson‘s (Fiction, S’15) short fiction piece, “Mag-Lite,” will be featured in the upcoming issue of the Chiron Review.

Let the Empire DownAlexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry ’12, also ex-faculty) second trade collection Let the Empire Down will be released through Biblioasis this spring and will be supported by a cross-Canada tour, including stops in Toronto, Mississauga, Kingston, Windsor, Peterborough and Vancouver. Poems of Alexandra’s have recently appeared in Partisan and the anthology Best Canadian Poetry 2015 (Tightrope Books). On a different note, Alexandra will be embarking on her PhD studies (in English and Cultural Studies) this fall at McMaster University.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) has started a new podcast with friends in Sitka, AK. The podcast is called Meet the Love Dorks and is all about finding love on a remote Alaskan island! You can find the show here.

The U.K.’s Venture Press has now e-published Michaela Roessner-Herman’s (Popular Fiction, S’08) second book, Vanishing Point, a science fiction novel set in the San Jose, CA, area, primarily in the Winchester Mystery house.

Richard SquiresRichard Squires (Fiction, S’14) published three stories last year: “The Best Friends Anyone Could Want” is in Upender: Art of Consequence; “The Soldier’s Relief” is in the Summer 2015 issue of The MacGuffin; and “Jews Don’t Believe in Hell” is in The Jewish Literary Journal.

The new trailer for Jacob Strunk‘s (Fiction, W’07) feature documentary The Green Standard debuted Super Bowl Sunday. You can see it here. And please follow the Facebook page for updates and festival information throughout the year.

Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) has recently been given the honor of winning the Dana Award in Fiction for the first forty pages of her novel, Escalante Moon. Receiving notification on her birthday was the greatest gift ever!

Julie VanDeKreke (Scharf) (Creative Nonfiction, S’10, best class ever!) will have her work featured in this upcoming publication of Mused: Online Literary Review, including two photographs, one poem, and a short nonfiction piece titled “Daddy’s Flowers.”

STUDENTS

Edge of Dark CoverBrenda Cooper‘s (Fiction) book Edge of Dark is a finalist for the Phillip K. Dick award for distinguished science fiction published in paperback original form in the United States. The award will be announced at Norwescon on March 25th in Seattle, WA. For more about the award, see http://www.philipkdickaward.org.

FACULTY

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) was featured in a February 27th article in UK newspaper The Guardian on why women writing about violence and sex is still considered transgressive, and she spoke at Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK, on the future of the novella as a literary form. Her recent reviews include Charlie Jane Anders’ All the Birds in the Sky for The Los Angeles Times, and works by Peter Straub, Glen Hirschberg, and Victor Lavalle for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. On April 1, she will be at the Rubin Museum in New York City as part of Brainwave 2016, an annual series which pairs artists with neuroscientists for onstage conversations about consciousness and creativity—she and Dr. Carl Bazil will discuss parasomnia and the nature of fear. Hand’s forthcoming novel, Hard Light, has just received strong advance reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly.

Dark ShadowsLook Homeward, Vampire,” the Dark Shadows essay that Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) wrote for Elizabeth Searle and Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s upcoming MacFarland book on soap operas is online at Elizabeth’s website, Celebrities in Disgrace.

Debra Marquart’s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) craft essay, “Tell It Cool: On Writing with Restraint,” is forthcoming the Spring issue of The New Ohio Review (Issue #19). She has co-edited an anthology of flash sequences with Robert Alexander and Eric Braun. Nothing to Declare: A Guide to the Flash Sequence (forthcoming from northingtodeclarecoverWhite Pine Press on April 12th, 2016) is a ground-breaking anthology of cross-genre work that includes linked prose poems, narrative sequences, lyrical essays, koans, fairy tales, and epistolary addresses. It contains the work of over fifty writers, including Nin Andrews, Jennifer Kwon Dobbs, Marie Harris, Jim Harrison, Gian Lombardo, Julie Marie Wade, and Gary Young. Also, Debra’s poem “Small Buried Things” has been published in Fracture: Essays, Poems and Stories on Fracking in America, co-edited by Taylor Brorby and Stefanie Brook Trout, recently published by Ice Cube Press. Fracture brings together a choir of established and emerging writers, giving voice to the complexities of hydraulic fracturing across the United States. During a time in which so much information is known about fracking, art is needed to move the public consciousness and national conversation towards better land practices.

DownEastCover_1603-1200-462x580In an essay in the March issue of Down East, Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) looks back on the pre-cool Portland she knew as an art school student in the 1970s. She thanks those who offered comments after she read an early draft of this at the January residency. Suzanne also is looking forward to the thirteenth Writers’ Day at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, MA, where she is writer in residence. The April 16th day of lectures on writing and publishing will include presentations by Stonecoast alums Bunny Goodjohn and Lisa C. Taylor. Both authors’ books, including Bunny’s newest novel The Beginning Things and Lisa’s new short story collection Growing a New Tail, will be available for sale throughout the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates June 2015

ALUMNI

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) drabble about an unfortunate house cat entitled “What Dolls Eat” will appear in The Were-Traveler in late May/early June. She is most pleased the editor called it “damn creepy” in her acceptance letter.

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) published a short story “A Song For You” on Motherboard themed from the Donny Hathaway song of the same name and the myth of Orpheus. Her novel Elysium has been placed on the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Honor List and is a Finalist for the Locus Award for Best First Novel.

808_largeJulie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “The Re’em Song” is now available in issue 258 of Interzone. Turns out so is Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) story “Doors.” This is almost more fun than one Stonecoast writer can handle—thankfully there are two of them to handle the load.

Hank Garfield (Fiction, S’04) will present a paper entitled “Madmen on the Water: The Golden Globe Singlehanded Sailboat Race of 1968-69 and Robert Stone’s Outerbridge Reach at the annual Sport Literature Association conference June 28 in Johnson City, Tennessee. See Hank’s blog, Slower Traffic, on walking, bicycling and not owning a car, at slowertraffic.net.

Bone SongBunny Goodjohn‘s (Poetry, W’07) first poetry collection, Bone Song, launches at the downtown YWCA in Lynchburg on June 18th at 7:15 p.m. Bone Song won the 2014 Liam Rector Prize and includes a jacket blurb from the rather fabulous Baron Wormser. The collection is available at Amazon; however, signed copies with free positive energy may be ordered from Bunny’s Etsy store.

Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) is proud to announce that her first book, a collection of micro-essays called Postcards from Here, will be released by Vine Leaves Press in 2016. Some pieces from the book have been previously published, and curious people can read online excerpts here and here.

Lesley Heiser (Fiction, S’11) won the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Short Nonfiction for her lyric essay “Saudade,” which was first published in The Stonecoast Review. She thanks Review editors Alexandria DelCourt, Alexis Paige, and others for helping to improve the piece. A shorter version was published this month in Hippocampus Magazine and is available here. Earlier this month, Lesley had a review/essay inspired by Los Angeles writer Wendy C. Ortiz’s second memoir, Hollywood Notebook, up on The Rumpus.

Alan King (Poetry, W’13) created a book trailer for his debut poetry collection, Drift.

The High Cost of Flowers by Cynthia Kraack (Fiction, W’10) won the best literary fiction award and the best contemporary fiction award in the 2014 Midwest Book Awards held April 13. This was the 25th anniversary of the awards with books submitted by independent, small, and academic presses in a twelve-state region. The High Cost of Flowers was released by Calumet Editions.

0615asimovs_smWill Ludwigsen (Popular Fiction, W’11) appears in the July 2015 issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction with “Acres of Perhaps.”

Mary Heather Noble‘s (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) essay “Reintroduction” is featured in Issue 7: Wilderness of Minerva Rising. She will be participating in the Bread Loaf Orion Environmental Writers’ Conference in Ripton, Vermont, this month, and will be working with acclaimed environmental writer Scott Russell Sanders. Mary Heather has also been invited as a writer-in-residence for PLAYA’s “Beyond Creating: A Climate of Change,” an Art + Ecology themed artist retreat that fosters collaboration among artists and scientists around environmental issues. PLAYA is a nonprofit organization based in Summer Lake, Oregon, that supports innovative thinking through work in the arts, literature, natural sciences and other fields of creative inquiry.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction (New Rivers Press)—an annual anthology of the best new fiction from established and emerging writers, edited by Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04)—has just been awarded the Midwest Independent Publishers Association award for Fiction: Short Story/Anthology, the first time an anthology has won the top prize. Former Stonecoast Director Lee Hope is one of the authors in the anthology, and founding faculty member Michael C White was the finalist and prize-awarding judge. He read the submissions blind. Submissions for the 2016 are being accepted through Submittable. Details are available at the New Rivers Press web site.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) narrative essay “Your Boyfriend’s Back” appears in the May issue of Front Porch. Lisa will present at HippoCamp 15, Hippocampus Magazine’s creative nonfiction conference in August. A preview of her session is at their blog.

Kara L. Storti’s (Fiction, S’06) debut young adult novel, Indigo in D-Town, will be released in Spring 2016 by CarolRhoda Lab, a division of Lerner Publishing Group. The book is about charming but tortured Phineas “Finn” Walt, a seventeen-year-old drug dealer who develops an unexpected friendship with an 80-year-old addict. Together they harvest and deal an unknown drug that transports the user to a favorite memory after which a “souvenir” appears from the past. The drug “hippo” is miraculous, highly addictive, and threatens to ruin Finn’s life by dredging up horrific childhood memories, tumbling him further into heroin abuse, and involving a psychopathic drug king out for blood.

51K-wdh5TxL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Nancy Swan (Fiction, W’11) is honored to have her essay “An Internship at New Rivers Press” included in the 50th Anniversary publication of New Rivers Press titled Paper Camera. This edition is published as a celebration of the enduring quality of the small press in the face of an ever-increasing pressure by other modes of publication in the writing world. The contents are intended to highlight the dynamic range of material considered by New Rivers Press as noteworthy of finding its way into print.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) is the winner of the New Works Competition at Hugo House for a flash fiction story, “Mosaic.” She will read alongside Meg Wolitzer, Justin Torres, and Amelia Gray in Seattle the end of May. Growing a New Tail, Lisa’s debut collection of short fiction, will launch late summer 2015 and in September in Dublin and Galway. The book will be published by Arlen House, distributed by Syracuse University Press.

Julie L. Vandekreke‘s (formerly Scharf; Creative Nonfiction, S’10) poem “Transparent” is forthcoming in the June 2015 edition of Mused: Bella Online Literary Review.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) is pleased to announce that her full-length poetry manuscript, Pierce & Brand’s World of Dangerous Wonders, is currently a semifinalist in the 2015 Negative Capability Press Book Competition. In addition, her chapbook manuscript, Imperative, is currently a semifinalist in YesYes Books’ 2015 Vinyl 45s Chapbook Contest.

2015 Negative Capability Press Book CompetitionMarco Wilkinson (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has two new pieces out.  His essay, “A House of Swing Doors: This Future Life (Calvatea gigantea)” on mushrooms and mortality, which began and greatly profited from being in a Stonecoast workshop, is in the May issue of DIAGRAM. His piece “Some Rules for Foraging” will appear in the summer issue of Taproot. Marco was also a finalist for the Sumer Literary Seminar Disquiet program in Lisbon and will be participating in the program this summer.

FACULTY

Jaed Coffin (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Writing for Social Change) will be telling a story for The Moth, on May 30th, at a sold-out show at Portland’s State Theater. The episode will be broadcast nationally on NPR. His story will be about the brief and wondrous life of Poppins, the cat.

Portuguese The Sacred Band V2The final volume of David Anthony Durham‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) Acacia series comes out this month in Portugal. It’s called Acácia – Vozes da Profecia, and is the sixth book in the series, as the publisher, Saída de Emergência, divided each book into two volumes.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “The Safe Word” will be published in the fall issue of Zone 3 literary magazine.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) recent reviews include The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings, in the Los Angeles Times, and Stephen King’s Finders Keepers for the Washington Post.

Labor Poetic Labor! 2Eléna Rivera (Poetry, Translation) has a new poem available on-line at Essay Press in the second volume of Labor Poetic Labor!. Stephen Motika (Poetry) has written an afterword to this issue.

The New York City premiere of Elizabeth Searle‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) rock opera—Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera—now has tickets on sale. It will be produced this summer as an official full-production show at the New York Musical Festival (NYMF) with dates now announced and tickets available June 1st for NYMF pass holders and June 15th for the general public. In addition to the performances, songs from the rock opera will be performed on June 25 at two showcase events: a NYMF Preview at the World Wide Plaza, West 50th and 8th Ave in NYC, 12:00-2:15 p.m. and also a showcase in the Broadway Sessions series at the Laurie Beechman Theater, 11:00 p.m., hosted by Broadway star Ben Cameron. In addition, there will be a Songwriters’ Showcase for Elizabeth in NYC later in July, details TBA. Elizabeth will be in NYC with the show during the residency but will be at Stonecoast in spirit and hopes to see Stonecoast alums at Rinkside. Check out the coverage in Backstage and Theater Mania. For more info and updates on performances and tickets, visit the show’s website.

Tonya & Nancy The Rock Opera NYMF Logo Hi Res

Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, will feature Stonecoast grad Elli Meeropol (Fiction, W’06) at its eighth annual “Are you a Bookie?” gathering of book clubs and book lovers, June 14, 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., at the campus, 588 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow, Massachusetts. Admission is free of charge and cake will be served. Elli will be reading from On Hurricane Island, her new novel. Several Stonecoasters are featured in the anthology that will be read from by panelist Nina Gaby, editor of Dumped. The event will include Karen Shepard as keynote speaker. She is the author of The Celestials, an historical novel inspired by the true story of 75 Chinese laborers brought to North Adams, Massachusetts, in 1870 to break a strike at a shoe factory. Emcee will be Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction), the university’s writer in residence and director of its writing program. All authors’ books will be available for sale and signing.

CONFERENCES

DSC_5904There is still space for writers to enroll at Iota: Short Prose Conference! Started by alum Penny Guisinger as a third semester project, Iota is now in its third year of offering high-quality writing instruction in short fiction, essays, prose poems, and all things flash and micro. You define “short”—it’s anything shorter than “long.” This year’s dates are July 23-26, and faculty are Richard Hoffman and Sarah Einstein. Come spend a long weekend writing short forms in Downeast Maine!

charles and sue-iotaCALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Interested in writing for the Stonecoast Community blog? We’re looking for all types of essays from alumni, students, and faculty about creative nonfiction, fiction, poetry, film, writing, MFAs, post-MFA, interviews, etc. Please contact Robert E. Stutts if you have something you’d like to share.

 

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Community News & Updates December 2014

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Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is thrilled to announce her space zombies story “Failsafe” (The Crimson Pact Volume 5, Iron Dragon Press, July 2013) has been listed by Ellen Datlow as an honorable mention for Year’s Best Horror 2013. This was the story she read from for her graduate reading. Note, you’ll see other Stonecoast names on this list too (Bonnie Stufflebeam is on there twice)! If you write horror, this list is a great way to see what publications Datlow is reading—consider submitting to them.

elysium-cvr-lrJennifer Marie Brissett‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) book Elysium, which was her Stonecoast thesis, has been published by Aqueduct Press  and is available on AmazonIndieBoundPowell’sBarnes & Noble, and Books-A-Million  or ask your local bookseller. Also, she will be interviewed on Hour of the Wolf with Jim Freund on WBAI on December 3rd.

Barbara P. Greenbaum (Fiction, S’05) just had two stories published: “About Time” will appear in the Fall issue of The MacGuffin, and “A Sensitive Man” appeared in The Penman Review in September. Barbara directs and teaches the creative writing program at Arts at the Capitol Theater, a public magnet arts high school in Willimantic, CT. Her stories and poems have appeared in a number of journals. She is currently working on her first novel. She writes under the pen name B. P. Greenbaum.

Susan Lilley‘s (Poetry, S’08) essay “Delmonico’s” was selected by Amy Hempel for Honorable Mention in Gulf Coast’s Barthelme Prize. She also has poems forthcoming in American Poetry Review. 

Mary Heather Noble (Creative Nonfiction, W’14) published her essay “Experimental Road” in Issue 16.2 of Fourth Genre (Fall 2014) and is pleased to report that the essay will also appear in the Winter 2014 print issue of Utne Reader.  Her essay “Acts of Courage,” winner of Creative Nonfiction’s The Human Face of Sustainability contest (Spring 2014, Issue #51), has also been nominated for a Pushcart Prize by the editors of Creative Nonfiction.  You may listen to Mary Heather’s podcast reading of “Acts of Courage” from her interview on the Jenny Green Jeans: Everyday Sustainable Living blog.

Anne Britting Oleson (Poetry, W’05) will have a new chapbook, Planes and Trains and Automobiles, coming out from Portent Press (UK) in early 2015.

An interview with Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) about her forthcoming book, Clutching Lambs, has been posted on the Negative Capabilities Press blog.

The 2014 edition of American Fiction: The Best Unpublished Stories by New and Emerging Writers has been released by New Rivers Press. Michael C. White—Stonecoast founding faculty member, Director of the Fairfield University MFA Program, and author of Five New York Times Notable Books—read twenty stories chosen by editor Bruce Pratt (Fiction, S’04) from nearly five-hundred entries and selected three prize winners and an honorable mention. White read all the submissions “blind.” Lee Hope, Stonecoast’s founding Director, was awarded Honorable Mention for her story “What to Take in Case of Fire” and Libby Cudmore‘s story “The Hand of God” is also included in the anthology.  The 2015 edition is currently in production and was judged by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Elizabeth Strout. The 2016 submission period will be announced in late winter.

“The Nurse We Needed,” an excerpt from a memoir manuscript by Lisa Romeo (Creative Nonfiction, S’08), appears in the Fall 2014 issue of The Healing Muse. Lisa recently read at the Live Literature event on the campus of Montclair State University (NJ), where she’s teaching an undergraduate CNF course this fall and spring semesters. Her manuscript was a finalist in the lyric CNF category of the recent Subito Press contest.

Lisa Taylor’s (Poetry, ’04) story “Immersion” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Crannog Magazine. She has new fiction forthcoming in Crack the Spine and Sonder Review, and her poem “Cathedral of Shadows” was nominated for the 2014 Best Indie Lit New England anthology.

FACULTY

Jeanne Marie Beaumont‘s (Poetry) poems “Fifteen Views of a Christening Gown” and “Portrait with Closed Eyes” appear in the new Winter edition of Ploughshares.

Elizabeth Hand (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just turned in Hard Light, the third Cass Neary noir novel, to St. Martin’s Press. Her essay on the photographer William Mortensen appeared recently in the Los Angeles Times. Recent reviews include  Sarah Waters’ The Paying Guests for the LA Times, and in the Washington Post, Stephen King’s Revival, Meg Wolitzer’s Belzhar, and Anne Rice’s Prince Lestat.  On December 4, she’ll give a talk about Ursula K. Le Guin and literary fantasy as part of the NEA’s Big Read at the University of Maine-Machias.

Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction) has sold a triptych of flash fiction to the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Two of the stories, now called  “Test” and “Tryst,” were written during previous Stonecoast residencies as part of his infamous Flash Fiction Challenge. Jim thanks his workshops for their help! His one-act play “The Promise of Space” has been published in the anthology Geek Theater, edited by Erin Underwood (a Stonecoast grad) and Jen Gunnels. Browse it here. The latest installment of his “On the Net” column, called “Billions and Billions,” has appeared online and in print in Asimov’s Science Fiction. Jim will be teaching at the Clarion Writers Workshop next summer, right before the Stonecoast residency; Jim is a graduate of Clarion and is returning to teach for the eleventh time.

December 5-14, Midcoast Actors Studio, of Belfast, Maine, will stage two of Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) 10-minute plays: Henny and Hitler in Hell (Adolf Hitler awakens in Henny Youngman’s Catskills dressing room) and The Muffin Man (an upscale brunch is interrupted by a homeless man who demands his English muffin grilled, not toasted).

Maine Playwrights' ShowcaseElizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has an essay in a new January 2015 collection from New Rivers Press: Paper Camera: A Half Century With New Rivers Press. The collection includes author Charles Baxter and Stonecoast alumni Nancy Swan. Elizabeth has work forthcoming in two more 2015 anthologies, including one from Algonquin Press edited by Elizabeth Benedict.   FINAL Book-Paper-Camera-1

Yankee Magazine features a new book by Suzanne Strempek Shea (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) in its November/December issue. This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Village’s Plight and the Medical Clinic That Brought Fresh Hope to Both is one of six books written by Yankee contributors and included in a piece titled “Where We Ought to Be” by Tim Clark, who has been the award-winning national magazine’s book reviewer for two decades. Called by Clark “a true story that vitalizes an Irish woman and an African village,” This Is Paradise is the first of two books Suzanne had published this year by PFP Publishing. The second, Make a Wish But Not For Money, a novel about a palm reader in a dead mall, launched in October.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

From Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12): Submit to The Catch: Writings from Downeast Maine. Deadline December 31. Poetry, fiction, nonfiction welcome.

 

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Community News & Updates August 2014

Those in the Stonecoast community who’d like to send a message of support to alum Beth Wilkins Lombardo (Fiction) as she deals with a serious health issue are invited to join the crowd of well-wishers at CaringBridge. Financial donations are being accepted here.

ALUMNI

Sheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction / Cross Genre, S’13) has won Prime Number Magazine‘s Creative Nonfiction contest, judged by Ned Stuckey-French, for her essay “A Question of Corvids.” The essay will be published in Prime Number Magazine in the fall and in the Prime Number Magazine, Editors’ Selections 2015 print annual. Sheila also had two poems published in July: “To a Kurdish Child” appears in Red Earth Review, and “Spin” appears in The Written River: A Journal of Eco-Poetics (free online).

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) continues to sneak genre fiction into literary venues—her haunted house short story “Something So Normal and Unwritten” will appear in Festival Writer‘s upcoming flash fiction issue (the publication of offsite AWP’s & M/MLA’s Festival of Language).

Julie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) flash piece “Drinking Grandma’s Tea” is now available in the online magazine Bartleby Snopes. If you feel so inclined, you can cast a vote to make it their Story of the Month; voting is open for the first few days of August.

John Florio (Fiction/Popular Fiction, S’07) has another novel due out August 19th. Blind Moon Alley (Prometheus/Seventh Street Books) is the second in a series of crime novels featuring Jersey Leo, an albino bartender working in an underground speakeasy during Prohibition. The book has already garnered excellent reviews, including a starred review from Publishers Weekly. Find out more at John’s website.

ZomburbiaAugust will see the release of Adam Gallardo‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) debut novel, Zomburbia, on the 26th. The book was given a very nice review by Kirkus. Here’s the pull quote: “Comics author Gallardo nails her voice—likable yet self-absorbed… the interpersonal drama strikes a comfortable balance with undead action. More brains than your average zombie novel…and more entrails as well!” More information about the book may be found at Adam’s web site, www.adamgallardo.com.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) is on a roll. Her second novel, The Beginning Things, will be published through Underground Voices in May 2015, and her first poetry collection, Bone Song, won the Liam Rector First Book Price 2014 and will be published through Briery Creek Press (Longwood University), also in May 2015.

July 25th was big for Penny Guisinger (Creative Nonfiction, S’13). Two pieces went live at online magazines on the same day! “Route Nine: Bangor to Lubec” appeared at Guernica, and “Batboy is Disappointed” went up in the new issue of Proximity. Later that afternoon, her name appeared in a Tweet for the first time! (She wonders if this is the big time?)

unnamedLissa Kiernan‘s (Poetry, S’11) first poetry collection—Two Faint Lines in the Violet—was published in July by Negative Capability Press. Her collection explores poetry’s unique ability to document yet revision the nuclear age, how when singing somewhere between the personal and political—if we listen closely—we might hear the social. She will be reading from her book on August 6th at Bar Thalia2537 Broadway at 95th St., New York, NY 10025. For future readings, videopoems, audiopoems, and more, visit twofaintlines.com.

PillarsPaul Kirsch (Popular Fiction, W’11) is once again writing for Obsidian Entertainment. This time he’s working on their upcoming Almanac of the Eastern Reach, 2823 AI—For Colonists, Explorers, and Curiosity-Seekers, which is one of the Kickstarter rewards for Pillars of Eternity. He previously wrote their Collector’s Edition book, which should be available this Winter.

An image of Janet Passehl‘s (Poetry, S’10) 2011 installation “Dam,” at St. Cecelia Convent In Brooklyn, New York, appears in Ploughshares Fall 2014 issue accompanying “Before Letting Go,” flash fiction by Carole Burns.

Dam by Janet Passehl

“Dam” by Janet Passehl

Helen Peppe (Creative Nonfiction, ’11) is honored that her memoir, Pigs Can’t Swim, is a 2014 New England Book Awards finalist in the company of former Stonecoast faculty Richard Hoffman with his new memoir Love & Fury.

futuredaze2-cover-pcsize-325x477Futuredaze 2: Reprise, edited by Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) and Nancy Holder (Faculty), will be published by Underwords Press on August 12, 2014. Erin will also be appearing at Loncon3 (the World Science Fiction Convention) in August 2014, and her press has launched a new website at www.underwordspress.com.

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) story “In-Depthness: Everywhere There Was Wine” has just been published at Grape Collective, and his piece “Taking Heat: Wresting The Jazz Back From Parker Jr.” appeared in Corkzilla. Watkins’ story “Beauty Is A Rare Thing: Building The 2012 Monte Bello” was recently a finalist in the “Blog Post of the Year” category for the 2014 Wine Blog Awards.

FACULTY

Jim Kelly‘s (Popular Fiction) newest story “The Rose Witch” will debut in the August edition of Clarkesworld.  His story “Someday” first appeared in the May issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction.  Two anthologies reprinting Jim’s stories which were scheduled for publication did indeed get published (no surprise!): “Soulcatcher” in The Year’s Best Science Fiction & Fantasy 2014, edited by Rich Horton (June), and “The Promise of Space” in The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection, edited by Gardner Dozois (July).  Jim’s story “The Chimp of the Popes” in The Book of Silverberg, edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schafer, was singled out as one of the best in the anthology in a review in the Los Angeles Review of Books. In late June, Jim was tapped as an emergency replacement to teach a week at the Clarion West Writers Workshop in Seattle, WA; he was workshopping three days after being asked.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has Flash Fiction on TheGloriaSirens.com (July 2014). She just had a personal essay accepted in a forthcoming anthology from She Writes Press titled Dumped: Women Unfriending Women—and was happy to learn the anthology also will include Stonecoast stars Kristabelle Munson, Penny Guisinger, Judith Powell, Alexis Paige, and Lindsey Wells.  In addition, Elizabeth is happy to know that she will be joined as contributing author in another forthcoming anthology—Paper Camera from New Rivers Press—by Stonecoast alumnai Nancy Swan.

Suzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) newest book, This Is Paradise, was the subject of the “Behind the Book” feature in the Julyl 27 Boston Globe. She’s celebrating that while packing her bags for Iota: The Conference of Short Prose on New Brunswick’s beautiful Campobello Island Aug. 14 to 17. The conference is the brainchild of grad Penny Guisinger, who has invited Suzanne to lead the fiction workshop while Barbara Hurd will work with nonfiction writers and Charles Coe will guide the poets. Spaces remain available so please visit the website if you’re interested. After that, Suzanne will be packing for Ireland, where she’ll be promoting This Is Paradise with September readings in Dingle, Howth, Galway, and Clifden. In Galway she will read with Stonecoast Ireland’s Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe, and in Clifden her reading will feature a performance by Leo Moran and Anthony Thistlethwaite of the Saw Doctors.

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