Tag Archives: Steve Rhodes

Community News & Updates January 2018

ALUMS

Elisabeth Tova Bailey’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’15) essay “Biophilia at my Bedside” was just published in the anthology Nature, Love, Medicine. The anthology, edited by Thomas Lowe Fleischner and published by Torrey House Press, includes essays by twenty-three writers including Robin Wall Kimmerer, Jane Hirschfield, and thich Nhat Hanh.

Karen Bovenmyer (Popular Fiction, S’13) is excited her story “The Scarlet Cloak” was reprinted in Like A Woman, a domestic violence benefit anthology. Her short story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow” was published in December’s issue of Gamut Magazine—classmates will recognize this story as inspired by her thesis novel-in-progess The Sleeping Boy. This just in: Factor Four Magazine will be publishing Karen’s science fiction short story “To Infinity and Beyond” in their inaugural issue. With this sale, Karen’s happy to announce she is applying to SFWA. She’s serving as a guest editor for Pseudopod Podcast for March 2018 and hope you all tune in to listen to the five awesome stories she selected (with the associate editing help of fellow ‘coasters Shawna Borman, Erin Roberts, and Cecelia Dockins). Her poem “Fire Lover” will appear in February’s Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, with an accompanying narration. Karen also has been narrating stories by others. Karen has created a recording of Penelope Evans’ “Wasps Make Honey” for a forthcoming episode of Escape Pod and Evan Dicken’s “The Taking Tree” for Pseudopod.

Illustration for Karen’s story “Snow as White as Skin as White as Snow”

Jennifer Marie Brissett (Popular Fiction, S’11) puts her memories of being a bookseller to use in a flash fiction story for the anthology Welcome to Dystopia edited by Gordon Van Gelder from OR Books. (Shh, most of the story I didn’t have to make up!)

Julie C. Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) short story “Re-stitched” can be found in the January edition of Split Lip magazine. “Re-stitched” is about two sisters, Alicia and Stephanie, their family dysfunction, and the impurity of human flesh. It’s about as creepy as you’d expect…

Terri Glass’s (Poetry/Creative Nonfiction, S’13) Terri’s poem, “Violet Green Swallows” was published in Young Raven’s Review, Issue 6. Her poem “Cow Tipping Tuesday” will be published in the 2018 San Diego Poetry Annual and her haiku in the Spring Issue of The Fourth River.

Cindy Williams Gutiérrez (Poetry, W’08) received the 2017 Oregon Book Award for Drama for her play Words That Burn. The play dramatizes the WWII experiences of conscientious-objector William Stafford, Japanese-American internee Lawson Inada, and Chicano Marine Guy Gabaldón in their own words. The play premiered at Milagro Theatre in Portland, Oregon, in September of 2014 in commemoration of the William Stafford Centennial, Hispanic Heritage Month, and the 70th anniversary of the rescindment of Executive Order 9066 (incarcerating Japanese-Americans). Words That Burn was also produced in 2017 at the Merc Playhouse in Twisp, Washington, and the Linkville Playhouse in Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Alan King’s (Poetry, W’13) Point Blank was reviewed in The Washington City Paper, Auburn Avenue, and Run Tell That Magazine.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) third collection of short fiction tinged with crime and the supernatural, Acres of Perhaps, will be appearing in April 2018. It is available now for preorder from Lethe Press if you would like to support the small press.

Carolyn O’Doherty‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) debut novel, Rewind, will be released April 10, 2018. The novel, published by Boyds Mills Press, tells the story of a group of teenagers with the ability to freeze time. The sequel will be published in Spring 2019.

Alexandra Oliver (Poetry, W’12) recently attended Continuum Music’s Urgent Voices multimedia performance in Toronto, featuring the debut of From the Diaries of William Lyon Mackenzie King, an operatic work for which she write the libretto. The Birmingham-based composer, Scott Wilson, was also in attendance. The Canada Council for the Arts has provided Oliver, Wilson, and Continuum director Ryan Scott with funding to develop the project.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, S’04) play Radio Silent has won the 2017 Meeting House Theatre Arts Lab’s annual new play contest and will receive a staged reading on January 20 at Schoodic Arts for All in Winterport, Maine. Pratt also won the award last year for his play The King of France. Several of his plays are among those being considered for full production next spring.

In addition to winning one of the South Carolina State Poetry Society contests, Steve Rhodes’s (Poetry, W’11) poem “Inheritance” won First Prize in Still: The Journal’s annual poetry contest.  He and his wife, Ann, moved to Charleston, South Carolina, three years ago. Steve recently completed his third poetry collection, What You Don’t See, and is looking for a publisher. He is currently working on a prose and poetry memoir. This past summer and fall he was invited to give poetry readings as part of hikes in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park led by the singer/song-writer Doug Peters. Great fun.

Tamie (Harkins) Parker Song’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’12) poem “Thirteen Ways of Killing the Captain’s Son” was published in Selkie Zine, issue 5. You can find it here.

Kathleen Saville (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) has been invited as a speaker to the Match 2018 Virginia Festival of the Book to share her memoir Rowing for My Life: Two Oceans, Two Lives, One Journey, published by Skyhorse/Arcade Publishing in February 2017. Information on how to attend the Festival is here.

Olive L. Sullivan‘s (Fiction/Poetry, S’15) poetry collection Wandering Bone is now available on Amazon or directly from the publisher, Meadowlark Books. Several of the poems in this book were written as part of her second semester project with Jeanne Marie Beaumount.

Karrie Waarala (Poetry, S’11) has three poems—“Memory of Museum of Memory,” “How to Remember,” and “The Morning After”—in the current issue of Blackbird. Her poem “Death Spends Halloween at the Country Bar” was recently nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Escape into Life, where her work was featured in July. And her short story “High Side” appeared in Five on the Fifth earlier this year; this was her first fiction publication.

Marco Wilkinson’s (Creative Nonfiction, S’13) essay, “Hidden Light, Wooden Ladder, Bucket of Clay, Pillar of Water,” will appear in issue four of the Bennington Review. His nonfiction manuscript, Madder, was the first runner-up in the 2017 Red Hen Press Non-Fiction Prize, judged by Mark Doty.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) was published in Vol. VI of The New Guard. “Dearest Mum” is part of The Dream Letters, an ongoing feature of the journal. Wilson’s fictional letter is excerpted from a novel-in-progress based on her great-grandmother, an orphan train.

CURRENT STUDENTS

Sarah Mack (Popular Fiction), publishing under S.M. Mack, won first place for the Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult Writing for her short story “The Carrying Beam.” The story was published online in Hunger Mountain, The VCFA Journal for the Arts, and is available here.

Illustration for Sarah’s story “The Carrying Beam”

FACULTY

David Anthony Durham (Fiction, Popular Fiction) just renewed the film option for Gabriel’s Story with Redwave Films, as well as the film/TV option for Pride of Carthage with Sonar Entertainment. His short story “All the Girls Love Michael Stein” will be republished in The Stonecoast Review and was recently published in translation in the Polish SFF magazine Nowa Fantastyka. He’s also signed on as one of the judges for the 2018 World Fantasy Awards. Details here via Locus.

Elizabeth Searle’s (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) novel We Got Him (New Rivers Press) is forthcoming as an AudioBook in 2018, recorded by Stonecoast alum Tanya Eby and her Blunder Woman Productions. Both Elizabeth’s opera and her rock opera about Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan will be produced in early 2018, at the time of the Winter Olympics. In January, the operetta group Mixed Precipitation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, will present Tonya and Nancy: The Opera—a one-act opera with libretto by Elizabeth and music by Abigail Al-Doory Cross—on Lake Harriet for the Art Shanties. Meanwhile, in New York City at 54Below on February 13th, Broadway stars sing a concert version of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera, a show which will be recorded as a CD from Broadway Records and which has recently received coverage from Playbill and Broadway World (you can read the Broadway World article here). For updates, see: www.elizabethsearle.net

 

 

 

 

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Community News & Updates May 2014

ALUMNI NEWS

Karen Bovenmyer‘s (Popular Fiction, S’13) poem “NeverNever Holes” was published April 10 on ZingaraPoet.

Bunny Goodjohn (Poetry, W’07) has creative nonfiction in the latest issue of Pithead Chapel. She has also wrangled a place on the Jessie duPont three-week summer-seminar series entitled “Constructing Childhood: Words and Pictures.”

Carolina Crimes coverSandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) sold the story “End of the World Community College,” a tongue-in-cheek story of apocalypse and hope, to The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction for publication later this year. Visit her at www.sandramcdonald.com.

Carolina Crimes: 19 Tales of Lust, Love, and Longing, published by Wildside Press, features stories by Sisters in Crime mystery writers from the Carolinas. A book trailer can be seen here. Karen Pullen (Popular Fiction, S’08) edited the stories, which includes her own “The Fourth Girl” about a recently fired teacher who inherits her aunt’s estate and finds that it comes with an unusual small business.

WhatMightNot--3x5x72In April, Steve Rhodes‘ (Poetry, W’11) second poetry collection was published by Wind. Of What Might Not Be Steve says, “This collection is a sequel to The Time I Didn’t Know What to Do Next. I’m trying to ponder those moments and places where the possible rubs up against the unlikely, where the boundary between ‘is’ and ‘might or might not be’ becomes blurred. I very much appreciate what Ted Deppe says about this collection: ‘These poems wonder at our being here at all.'”

Michaela Roessner-Herman (Popular Fiction, S’08) has been asked to contribute to an upcoming Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America Cookbook—the third that SFWA has produced, this time as part of SFWA’s 50th anniversary celebration in 2015. Michaela has previously provided recipes for two other genre-related cookbooks, both of which where fundraisers for the Tiptree Award: Her Smoke Rose Up from Supper and The Bakery Men Don’t See.

Lisa Romeo‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’08) flash essay “Coffee Regular,” an excerpt from her memoir-in-essays manuscript, appeared in the March issue of Gravel Magazine. Lisa was interviewed recently for The Writer’s Hot Seat section of the Barnstorm Journal blog. She would like to remind all in the Stonecoast community that she extends an open invitation to feature your guest post at her blog to help support your book or other creative project.

Lisa C. Taylor (Poetry, ’04) will be presenting a workshop on “Going into Dark Places: Taboos in Writing” at the Massachusetts Poetry Festival in Salem on May 3, 2014, at the Hawthorne Hotel. A recent interview with Lisa is in the online edition of The Worcester Review; her poem “Cathedral of Shadows” was published there in March. Also, she has new fiction appearing in Bartleby Snopes online and Mulberry Fork Review online.

Adrienne S. Wallner (Poetry, W’09) has accepted a position as a Wilderness Instructor with New Vision Wilderness, a wilderness immersion therapy and education program in northern Wisconsin. Some writing-specific work she will be doing with clients includes therapeutic journaling, poetry, ekphrasis, and nature writing. She is very excited to start her new position in September. (Those of you who spoke with her at AWP—yes, this is the job she was talking about!).

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) is thrilled to see her story “The Cozy Corner” in volume three of The New Guard. The story, excerpted from her Stonecoast creative thesis, was a finalist for the Machigonne Fiction Contest.

FACULTY NEWS

Boman Desai‘s (Fiction) novel The Lesbian Man was shortlisted for the Dana Award for novels. The first chapter of the same novel won first place in a competition of first chapters late last year.

Aaron Hamburger‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction, Popular Fiction) short story “Honeymoon for One” (which he read at the last residency) is in the new issue of Subtropics.

Elizabeth Hand‘s (Fiction, Popular Fiction) essay “Saved by Obamacare,” about her experience with the Affordable Care Act, appeared in Salon.

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a story in Dead But Not Forgotten: Stories from the World of Sookie Stackhouse. The Anthology will be released first by Audible on May 13, with hardcover and e-book releases in November. She is also an Author Guest of Honor at the World Horror Convention May 8-11 in Portland, OR.

BEST SFF 8Three new appearances in print this month for Jim Kelly (Popular Fiction): “The Pope of the Chimps” in The Book of Silverberg, edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schafer published on May 1; “Bernardo’s House,” a stand-alone e-book in English and Italian from Roman publisher Future Fiction; and “The Promise of Space” in The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eight, edited by Jonathan Strahan, due on May 18. His super-hero story “The Biggest,” originally commissioned by Stonecoast alumna Mur Lafferty, has been recorded for the podcast Starship Sofa Episode 334. Jim has adapted “The Promise of Space” for the stage and it will appear this fall in the anthology Geek Theater: 12 Plays by Science Fiction and Fantasy Masters, edited by Jen Gunnels and Stonecoast alumna Erin Underwood.

Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) monologues “Nightmare Girl” and “Career Day” took first prize in the Maine Playwrights Festival’s Monologathon. His full-length play Duck and Cover was voted Audience Favorite in Dezart Performs Play Reading Series (Palm Springs, CA), and the play will be fully staged in January 2015. The Players’ Ring (Portsmouth, NH) has announced that Mike’s Edgar-nominated play “Ghosts of Ocean House” will run for three weeks in October 2014.

dezart announcement

prprairie-gold-coverDebra Marquart‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Poetry) essay “Not All There” appeared in Prairie Gold: An Anthology of the American Heartland. Her poem “Kablooey Is the Sound You’ll Hear” was published in The Normal School: A Literary Magazine. Also, Debra traveled inside the North Dakota oil boom under a grant from the North Dakota Humanities Council during November of 2013. She taught writing workshops in thirteen communities impacted by the oil boom for a research project. Read about her first impressions of this fast-moving environmental story inside the Bakken oil boom here.

A Month Inside the Oil Boom: the North Dakota highway leading into the Badlands.

A Month Inside the Oil Boom: the North Dakota highway leading into the Badlands (photo provided by Debra Marquart).

Alexandra Oliver‘s (Poetry, ’12) book Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway has been shortlisted for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award, given for the best book of poetry by a Canadian woman published during the previous year. The winner of this award will be announced in June. An interview with Rob McLennan on the subject of this nomination can be found here. In addition to this, Alexandra is this month’s Guest Contributor for the BANG section of The New Guard Review.

Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) has a new short story, “The Quiet Car,” just published in Solstice literary magazine. For fellow fans of train-writing: this story takes place on an Amtrak “Quiet Car.”

this-is-paradise-coverSuzanne Strempek Shea‘s (Creative Nonfiction, Fiction) Portland, ME, reading from her newly released book This Is Paradise has been rescheduled to Thursday, May 22. She thanks those who first marked their calendars for May 8, then May 9. She promises this will be the last date change. The reading will be held at 6:00 p.m. at The Gallery at Harmon’s and Barton’s, 584 Congress Street. This Is Paradise is the story of the Irish woman Mags Riordan and the medical clinic she founded in the remote Malawian village where her son died while on holiday. A TV interview with Mags Riordan and Suzanne is here. A story on the book, from The Republican of Springfield, MA, is here. Suzanne will also be reading May 31 at 11:00 a.m. at Toadstool Books in Peterborough, NH, and on the same at the Toadstool store in Keene, NH, at 2:00 p.m. The books was launched April 23 at Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA, and Suzanne thanks all the Stonecoasters who attended. Two days later, Suzanne served as emcee for Bay Path College’s 19th annual Women’s Leadership Conference in Springfield, MA. Bearing the theme “Own Your Story,” the event featured television legend Barbara Walters, New York Times columnist Bruce Feiler and Syria Deeply founder Lara Setrakian, and was attended by a crowd of more than 2,000.

Author's-eye view of Broadside Bookshop launch of 'This Is Paradise.' Stonecoaster scan starts with Lisa Taylor in front row and former faculty member Leslea Newman in second row.

Author’s-eye view of Broadside Bookshop launch of This Is Paradise. Stonecoaster scan starts with Lisa Taylor in front row and former faculty member Lesléa Newman in second row.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Call for Submissions for an Anthology Celebrating the Life and Work of Bill Morrissey
This book will be edited by Bill friends and New England writers Bruce Pratt and Suzanne Strempek Shea.

Singer, songwriter, novelist, outdoorsman, raconteur, family member, friend—Bill Morrissey was many things to the many, many, many people he touched in his life. We’d like to know just who he was to you. Submit your essay to be considered for a proposed anthology that will illustrate the innumerable sides of a man who left us far too soon, and left us with so much. Whether you know him from high school, or the high stool, whether you are a friend who shared a stage with him or a fan who shared his love of small towns on the river, tell us your Bill story.

Nonfiction submissions (essays, stories, lyrics, poems, appreciations) of up to 5,000 words should be sent in Word format by August 1 to bp.manuscripts (at) gmaildot.com. Include a cover letter with full contact information and a brief description of your connection to Bill. Contract will follow acceptance.

Suzanne Strempek Shea is the author of five novels and five works of nonfiction, including the newly released This Is Paradise: An Irish Mother’s Grief, an African Vllage’s Plight and the Medical Clinic that Brought Fresh Hope to Both. Her friendship with Bill sprang from their shared Polish heritage and their love of small towns on the river. Suzanne has been featured on NBC’s Today, National Public Radio and Voice of America, and in USA Today and The Washington Post. Her freelance work has appeared in The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, ESPN the Magazine, Yankee and Bark. Suzanne teaches at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program and is director of the creative writing program and writer in residence at Bay Path College in Longmeadow, MA.

Bruce Pratt is the author of the novel The Serpents of Blissfull from Mountain State Press and the poetry collection Boreal from Antrim House Books. He has won prizes and awards for his drama, short fiction, poetry, and songwriting, and his work has been published in dozens of journal and reviews in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. For twenty years he plied his trade as a singer/songwriter and for fifteen of those years traveled extensively with Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. He was a long time friend and admirer of Bill, with whom he performed on many occasions. Pratt is the editor of the Annual American Fiction Anthology from New Rivers Press. Retired from performing, Pratt teaches Creative Writing and Literature at the University of Maine and to private students.

 

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Community News & Updates April 2013

ALUMNI NEWS

Faith and MadnessSarah Slagle Arnold‘s (Creative Nonfiction, S’05) memoir, Faith and Madness: A Spiritual and Psychological Journey, was published August 1, 2012, by Wipf & Stock’s Cascade Books imprint. The story of growing up with a manic-depressive father and Sarah’s own major depression at age 19 takes place in the Depression years of the 30s and 40s. The department store where Sarah worked only part-time paid for her three-time-a-week therapy, which she believes saved her life, for a year and a half. Receipt of her first royalty check in March was a thrill, Sarah reports, and should be shared with all her mentors at Stonecoast. Look for Faith and Madness at the summer 2013 residence or on Amazon.

A capella ZooJulie Day‘s (Popular Fiction, S’12) story “Finding Your Way to the Coast” appears in A capella Zoo‘s best-of, fifth-anniversary edition, entitled Bestiary: The Best of the Inaugural Demi-Decade of A capella Zoo.

Christopher Fisher‘s (Fiction, W’08) novel A History of Stone and Steel will be released in print and available via Amazon.com this month. The novel, which he affectionately calls HOSS, began as his creative thesis at Stonecoast.

The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative, a provider of online poetry workshops created by Lissa Kiernan (Poetry, S’11), was profiled in the Co-operative News for World Poetry Day.

trm-teaching-artists

The Rooster Moans Poetry Cooperative

Jeanette Lynes‘ (Poetry/Fiction ’05) sixth collection of poetry, Archive of the Undressed (Wolsak & Wynn, 2012) has been shortlisted for two Saskatchewan Book Awards:  the Poetry Award and the Saskatoon Book Award.

Sandra McDonald (Popular Fiction, W’05) recently attended the AWP national conference in Boston and participated in a panel about Low-Res MFA programs as well as the Stonecoast reading at the Boston Public Library. She also attended the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando and read from her story “The Black Feminist’s Guide to Science Fiction Film Editing” (forthcoming, The Year’s Best Science Fiction and Fantasty 2013).

Janet Passehl (Poetry, S’10) has three poems in Calibanonline #11, forthcoming in mid-April 2013.

Mihku Paul (Fiction, S’10) will be participating in a group ekphrasis exhibit at the Yarmouth Memorial Library (Yarmouth, ME) titled Poets Speaking to Silent Works of Art, April 8-May 25. She will contribute a poem to accompany Evelyn Dunphy’s watercolor painting The Embrace, which can be viewed on the YML site.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, ’04) short play Memories of Paradise will be performed as part of the Maine Playwright’s Festival and will appear in the March issue of Aethlon: The Journal of Sports Literature. The play festival runs from April 25-May 5 at the St. Lawrence Arts Center in Portland, ME. Information is availabler here (Stonecaost faculty member Mike Kimball has a play in the festival, too). Also, Bruce will join fellow Stonecoast classmate Marcia Brown in Cape Elizabeth for the May Local Buzz reading on Saturday, May 18, 4:00-5:00 p.m.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) reports that three of his poems—“Possums,” “Sparrows,” and “Toad”—will be part of an exhibition, “Fables of the Eco-Future,” at the Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, GA. The exhibit (March 30-June 8), by both visual artists and writers, will feature works either about environmental degradation or its alternative.

My First BeatriceMoon Pie Press published its 70th poetry book, My First Beatrice by David Stankiewicz (Poetry, S’05), recently. Former Stonecoast faculty member Baron Wormser said of David’s collection: “David Stankiewicz’s poetry has a natural depth and balance to it. Degrees of tenderness, ruefulness and the ever-new standbys that are grief and joy intermingle and influence one another so that the complexity of a moment or feeling or place or life is properly honored. The sensibility at work here is at once American in its feeling for how locales speak and European, specifically Polish, in its feeling for the shades and shadows of history. The poems are, above all, shot through with love. The poet’s hand and heart are—as it should be—intimately connected.”

ChristopherWatkins (3)

Christopher Watkins

Christopher Watkins‘ (Poetry, W’08) poem “The Clock Hands of a Child” has just appeared in the new issue of The Massachusetts Review. His poem “As If She Has Two Marbles In Her Ears” has just appeared in the new issue of Redivider. Additional details available here.

Erin Underwood (Popular Fiction, S’09) invites you to a Reading & Signing for Futuredaze: An Anthology of YA Science Fiction, co-edited by Erin and Hannah Strom-Martin (Popular Fiction, W’09) and published on February 12, 2013.

futuredaze-cover-finalDate: Saturday, April 6
Time: 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Location: Spirit of ’76 Bookstore, 107 Pleasant Street, Marblehead, MA 01945
Young adults will be reading excerpts from Futuredaze at the Spirit of ’76 Bookstore in Marblehead! A reception and book signing with Marblehead resident Erin Underwood, the anthology’s co-editor and publisher, will follow. Students aged 12 to 18 are encouraged to drop off in advance or write a one-paragraph essay at the event on why they like to read science fiction to be entered in a drawing for two signed copies of Futuredaze. More information here.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) has a story, “December Bride,” in Marco Polo Arts Magazine. The piece was first drafted at Stonecoast. Two of Tamra’s “bridesmaids” have won second place in competitions sponsored by Charlotte Writers Club: the 2013 Creative Nonfiction Contest and the 2013 Children’s Story Contest.

STUDENT NEWS

Ed Ferrara (Popular Fiction) has just sold his short story “Gig Marks” to the horror podcast Pseudopod. No firm information yet as to when the story will appear, but it could be within the next few months.

A Decent Happiness,” an essay by Alexis A. Paige (Creative Nonfiction), appears in the March issue of Pithead Chapel. Also, she guest blogged during AWP for Brevity Magazine, which plans to feature two of her posts.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam‘s (Popular Fiction) short story “The Siren” will appear in Strange Horizons on April 15. You can read it for free here.

FACULTY NEWS

Ted Deppe and Annie Deppe will give a reading at 7:00 p.m. on April 15 at Manchester Community College as part of the Mishi-maya-gat Spoken Word and Music Series. The reading is free and open to the public, and it will be followed by an evening of jazz with Norman Johnson and featured musicians. The address is 903 Main Street, Manchester, CT. More information can be found here.

LiteraryOrange_p090331_02sqNancy Holder (Popular Fiction) has a busy April. On Saturday, April 6, at 10:30-11:30 a.m., she will participate in The Horror Panel: Dead and Loving It, with a signing following, at Literary Orange: A Celebration of Authors, Readers, and Libraries, to be held at the Irvine Marriott. On April 20, she will sign from 12:00-2:00 p.m. in the Horror Writers Association Booth (#859) at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, held on the campus of the University of Southern California; she will also work in the booth on Saturday. On April 23, she will participate in World Book Night; her book is Fahrenheit 451. And on April 24, Nancy will participate in the Chapman University Pub(lishing) Crawl; students will meet and greet authors and discuss publishing; Stonecoast poetry faculty member Tony Barnstone will also participate.

On April 1st, Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) short play Janey Succumbs to Polar Madness will have a staged reading at Stonecoast alum Emily Young‘s ongoing author series Portland Writes at LFK burger bar (188A State Street, Portland, ME. 207.899.3277). STONECOAST ALERT: Jim Kelly and Emily Young will also be reading! Drinks at 8:00 p.m.; readings at 9:00.  Also, a full production of Mike’s Janey Succumbs to Polar Madness will be staged as part of the 12th annual Maine Playwrights Festival at the St. Lawrence Center for the Arts in Portland, ME, April 25-May 5. See the schedule here.

On April 6, Elizabeth Searle (Fiction, Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) will read in the Storied Nights reading series, sponsored by the Somerville Arts Council at Bloc 11 Cafe, 11 Bow Street, Somerville, MA, from 7:00-9:00 p.m., along with other authors, storytellers, and host Daniel Gerwetz. On April 22, a New York City showcase of Tonya & Nancy: The Rock Opera will be performed, featuring Broadway star Melissa Van Der Schyff as the Mother(s) and directed by Kenny Howard of Broadway Consortium. This NYC showcase is produced by Paul Boghosian and Harborside Films. For more information, check Events on Elizabeth’s website.

CONTESTS

Via Christopher Fisher: Attention novelists: If you’ve complete a book (maybe a NaNoWriMo manuscript you’ve been sitting on and wondering what to do with) and you have considered going indie/self-pub with it, then you need to check this out! The Editorial Department’s contest is free to enter, and the winning manuscript receives a grand-prize book design package worth $2500. If a lack of funds is the only thing keeping you from publishing, then this could be your ticket to having a book in print (and Kindle) and available for sale on Amazon as soon as this October!

Via Bruce Pratt: The American Fiction Prize (The Best Unpublished Short Stories by American Writers). This series, whose first six issues were published by Birch Lane Press/Carol Publishing Group, was called “a must-read collection for all short-fiction enthusiasts” by Booklist. The series moved to New Rivers Press in 1997; editors Alan Davis and Michael White chose previously unpublished stories for inclusion in the first ten volumes. Volumes 11 (2010) and 12 (2012) were edited by Kristen Tsetsi, Bayard Godsave, and Bruce Pratt. Volume 13–set for publication in 2014–is being edited by Bruce Pratt. A well-known writer serves as guest judge, chooses three prizewinners who receive a cash award, and writes the introduction. This year’s judge is Michael White. In 1998, Writer’s Digest chose the series as one of the top fifteen fiction magazines in the United States.

First Prize: $1,000
Second Prize: $500
Third Prize: $250
Entry Fee: $16/story

Previous finalist  judges include Charles Baxter, Ann Beattie, Robert Boswell, Ray Carver, Louise Erdrich, Clint McCown, Antonya Nelson, Josip Novakovich, Joyce Carol Oates, Tim O’Brien, Wallace Stegner, Anne Tyler, and Tobias Wolff.

Contest Guidelines: New Rivers Press will publish approximately twenty short stories in each American Fiction volume, subtitled The Best Unpublished Stories by Emerging Writers. We seek well crafted, character driven literary fiction in any genre with a maximum of 10,000 words per story. Each of the selected story authors will receive national publication and distribution, author discount, and two complimentary copies. $1,750 in prizes will be awarded. ($1,000 for 1st place, $500 for 2nd place, and $250 for 3rd place). The finalist judge for Volume 13 is Michael White. There is a reading fee of $16 for each online submission from Feb. 1 through June 15 at the Submittable website.

Submit electronically or mail entries to

American Fiction Prize
New Rivers Press
1104 7th Ave. S.
Moorhead, MN 56563

Mailed entries must include a cover page with your name, story title, mailing address, and email address. Do not include your name on the pages of the story. Please ensure all stories are typed, double-spaced, and that the title and page number appear on each page. Please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope and an e-mail address.

We welcome multiple entries ($16/story). For entries outside the U.S., please send entry fee in U.S. currency or money order. While we cannot return manuscripts, we will forward a list of the winning stories to any entrant who includes an SASE and we will e-mail contest updates to anyone who provides an active e-mail address. Entrants retain all rights to their stories.

Please e-mail any questions to obdriveway@aol.com

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Via Christopher Fisher: Call for applications: The Editorial Department is looking for an experienced book designer for independent contractor work. See the ad here for details and to apply.

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Community News & Updates March 2013

ALUMNI NEWS

Being Henry DavidCal Armistead‘s (Fiction, W’07) debut young adult novel, Being Henry David, was released three weeks ahead of its March 1 release date by Albert Whitman Teen. It has received favorable reviews, including a starred review in Kirkus Reviews, and has already sold out is first printing! Luckily, a second printing is underway.

Kathy Briccetti (Creative Nonfiction, W’07) will be attending the Vermont College of Fine Arts Post-Graduate Writers’ Conference in Montpelier in August to work on her novel manuscript with Lee Martin.

Libby Cudmore (Popular Fiction, S’10) has begun her yearlong stunt memoir project, Geek Girl Goes Glam, testing and following vintage beauty, dating, career, and housekeeping tips and advice.

David Hewitt (Popular Fiction, S’09) will, as of Fall 2013, be taking up a permanent full-time post on the English faculty of the Community College of Baltimore County.

NoReturn_Press_Corrected_FinalV1Zachary Jernigan‘s (Popular Fiction, S’11) debut fantasy novel, No Return, comes out from Night Shade Books in hardcover, ebook, and Audible audiobook on March 5th, 2013.

Lissa Kiernan‘s (Poetry, S’11) “The Art of Hurricanes” appears in Underwater New York, and two poems, “Whereas” and “Ecologue on Decommissioning,” are featured as finalists in Terrain.org’s third annual contest.

Mike Langworthy (Creative Nonfiction, W’11) has been hired as a consulting producer on Spun Out, a new situation comedy starring Dave Foley recently ordered for 13 episodes by Candian television network CTV, with production tentative scheduled to begin May 2013 for a summer launch. He continues in development on a syndicated children’s series, working title Rock Island, as co-creator and executive producer. The Star Angel, from Colonial Radio Theater, on which he worked as a consulting producer, has been nominated for an Audie Award as best audio drama. He is currently adapting the story as an animated feature. Also in development is a romantic comedy movie for television, working title Survey Monkey, with director Brian Roberts for MarVista Entertainment.

Will Ludwigsen‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) collection In Search Of and Others releases today and has already received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews. He has also been interviewed by Adam Mills (Popular Fiction, W’12) for Weird Fiction Review and by Zachary Jernigan (Popular Fiction, S’11) at his blog.

Kings of RuinMatthew Quinn Martin‘s (Popular Fiction, S’10) novel Nightlife (an earlier draft of which was his MFA thesis) has sold to Pocket Star (Simon & Schuster) as part of a two-book deal along with an, as yet, unwritten sequel.

Sandra McDonald‘s (Popular Fiction, W’05) latest GLBTQ novel for teen readers (under the pseudonym Sam Cameron) goes on sale this month. Kings of Ruin is about teens, aliens, rock ‘n’ roll, and secret government agencies.

MagickByMoonriseFinalThe launch book in Laura Navarre‘s (Popular Fiction, W’11) Tudor paranormal romance trilogy for Harlequin/Carina, titled Magick by Moonrise, comes out in print and Audible formats on March 11. When Tudor England and the Faerie kingdom collide, the players risk all for power. But only love can save them. Magick by Moonrise won the Pacific Northwest Writers Association’s 2012 award for romance. Pick up your copy here.

Bruce Pratt‘s (Fiction, 04) poem “A distant ship tiding home,” awarded the 2007 Ellipsis poetry prize by James Galvin for Ellipsis: A Journal of Literature and Art, and included in his collection Boreal from Antrim House Books, also 2007, has been selected for inclusion in the non-fiction and poetry anthology The Heart of All That Is: Reflections on Home, from Holy Cow Press to be published in October 2013. His short play Memories of Paradise will be performed as part of the 2013 Maine Play Festival at the St. Lawrence Arts Center in Portland. The festival runs from April 25 through May 5. Information on the festival, which also includes work by Stonecoast faculty member Mike Kimball, is available here. The play will also be published in the forthcoming Spring issue of Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature and will be presented as a reading at the annual Sport Literature Association Conference in Monmouth, NJ, this June. obdriveway@aol.com

Michaela Roessner-Herman (Popular Fiction, S’08) is contributing essays on writing to the Western State Colorado University Fiction Concentration blog. To date, she’s posted articles on the author/reader contract, misdirection, and cueing/filtering.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, W’11) reports that Still has just published his poem “Red-eyed Vireo,” which also was a finalist in that journal’s recent poetry contest. In addition, Christianity and Literature has accepted his poem “Into the Woods.”

Catherine Schmitt (Creative Nonfiction, W’12) is organizing a reading series by authors of recent Gulf of Maine-related books at the Maine Fishermen’s Forum March 1-2. More information can be found here. She also has a review of one of the books, Mortal Sea by Jeffrey Bolster, in the current issue of The Working Waterfront newspaper.

STUDENT NEWS

Boneham_book_dropdead_90dpiSheila Boneham (Creative Nonfiction/Cross Genre) will be reading “Chasm Familiaris” at the bi-annual meeting of the Association for the Study of Literature & Environment in Lawrence, KS, in May. “Chasm” is excerpted from a long narrative nonfiction WIP that “blends elements of memoir, science, folklore, contemporary culture, and history…not to provide answers but to provoke thoughtful (re)considerations of our attitudes and actions as they may affect the future of Canis lupus familiaris, both the species and the warm muzzles in our hands.” Sheila’s reading will be part of a panel called “Connecting with Canines: A Creative Nonfiction Reading.” Also, Sheila spoke on plot character development in her mystery Drop Dead on Recall at Book ‘Em North Carolina Writers Conference and Book Fair on February 23. The Book ‘Em Foundation, a partnership between authors and law enforcement, holds events to raise public awareness of the correlation between high illiteracy rates and high crime rates. Sheila and other authors donated at least 40% of proceeds from the sales of their books to the community—in this case, Robesome County and Lumberton, NC—for the purpose of increasing literacy and reducing crime.

The Hermes & Hekate Road Show, a radio drama-style serial podcast that Genevieve Williams (Popular Fiction) has been working, on launches in March with a “season” of seven episodes; if it’s well received additional “seasons” will be written and produced. Interested listeners can find it here or check out the Facebook page.

FACULTY NEWS

Tony Barnstone‘s (Poetry, Translation) new book of poems, Buddha in Flames, has been accepted for publication in 2014 by Sheep Meadow Press. In addition, his CD of original music, Tokyo’s Burning: WWII Songs, is available for purchase at CD Baby, Amazon.com, iTunes, and Spotify. His selected poems Bestia en el Apartamento: Antología poética (1999-2012) will appear in a bilingual Spanish-English edition with Ediciones El Tucán de Virginia (Mexico City) in 2013, with translations by Mariano Zaro.

Portugeuse Other LandsDavid Anthony Durham (Popular Fiction) has two new foreign language publications. The Sacred Band has just been released in France as L’alliance sacrée, and the first half of The Other Lands has been released in Portugal as Outras Terras (they’re publishing the trilogy as a six-book series).

Nancy Holder (Popular Fiction) will appear on three panels at the Tucson Festival of Books, the fourth largest book festival in the U.S.:

Romance: The Last Frontier in SciFi & Fantasy
Saturday, March 9th, 10:00-11:00 a.m.
Integrated Learning Center – Room 140

It’s Not all Demons, Death and Destruction
Saturday, March 9th, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Koffler – Room 216

Writing Fantasy for a Young Adult Audience
Saturday, March 9th, 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Integrated Learning Center – Room 140

Nancy will also be a guest lecturer at Pepperdine University on March 27th, and she will be one of two Author Guests of Honor at the 2014 World Horror Convention in Portland, OR (the other is Jack Ketchum).

ebTwo of Mike Kimball‘s (Popular Fiction, Scriptwriting) short plays, Henny and Hitler in Hell and Falling Falling: A Gothic Mystery, will be featured in a show called Evening Broadcasts III, which will be staged at The Players’ Ring in Portsmouth, NH, from March 8-24. For reservations and additional information, click here.

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Community News & Updates September 2012

ALUMNI NEWS

Cal Armistead (Fiction, W’07) has published her first young adult novel, Being Henry David (Albert Whitman & Co.), which will be released March 1, 2013. Visit her at www.calarmistead.com.

Jeanette Lynes‘ (Popular Fiction, ’05) sixth book of poetry, Archive of the Undressed, is forthcoming from Wolsak and Wynn in September 2012. The poems explore pin-up, Playboy, burlesque, and rural repression.

Mihku Paul‘s first book of poetry, 20th Century PowWow Playland, has just been published by Bowman Books, an imprint of the Greenfield Review Press. Portions of the book were written at Stonecoast, while working with Richard Hoffman and Baron Wormser. 20th Century PowWow Playland is available from the publisher at nativeauthors.com and will soon be available in local bookstores. Plans are in the works for availability in digital format as well. Also, Mihku’s panel proposal for AWP 2013 Boston was recently accepted for presentation. This is her second panel acceptance for AWP. The panel, HOME/LAND: Inner Landscapes and Outer Geographies in the Work of Native Northeast Poets, examines the expansion of landscape in the imagination of contemporary Native poets in the northeast and explores the question of psychic and spiritual connection to homeland for Native people who have lost much of their land base. Guest panelists include Lisa Brooks and Cheryl Savageau.

The new Platte Valley Review includes Bruce Pratt‘s story “Missing Person” and the latest issue of Puckerbrush Review contains his story “May Alison.” Bruce has recently accepted a part-time position with the Penobscot Theatre Company and would like to receive scripts—especially dramas, one-acts, and shorter plays—from any SC alums or faculty. Email Bruce at obdriveway@aol.com for more information and please include in the subject header Northern Writes.

Steve Rhodes (Poetry, ’10) says, “I had a pretty fair year of finding journal homes for my poems in Coal City Review, Roanoke Review, The SHOp (Ireland), Saranac Review, Sow’s Ear, Crate, Off the Coast, and Chocorua Review, the new mag edited by SC alums Nylah Lyman and Kevin St. Jarre. I’m shopping my new poetry collection around—titled Ready to Be a Little Happy. Finally, I’m back at work on my memoir with help from Suzanne Strempek Shea. Life is good.”

Michaela Roessner has signed a contract with Tachyon Publications to complete the third book in her food-focused fantasy trilogy that revolves around the life of Catherine de Medici. Besides the print edition of the third book, the agreement also includes the publishing of all three books as e-books.

Julie Scharf‘s poem, “Watching Shadows,” will appear in the Autumn 2012 edition of Mused.

Robert E. Stutts (Popular Fiction, S’10) had a critical essay, “Reconciling the Manichaean Heresy in Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita,” published in The Explicator in September 2012; the essay was originally written as one of his Stonecoast annotations.

Tamra Wilson (Fiction, S’11) is a finalist for the Marchigonne Fiction Contest. Her story, “The Cozy Corner,” will appear in the upcoming issue of The New Guard. Meanwhile, her essay, “Traveling Partners,” is in the Chicken Soup anthology I Can’t Believe My Cat Did That, coming September 18th to bookstores everywhere. Tamra is also a contributor to WFAEats, an online foodie journal for NPR station WFAE, Charlotte. Read her posts here.

FACULTY NEWS

Elizabeth Searle (faculty) and Steve Almond have organized a literary and musical benefit for Elizabeth Warren’s senatorial campaign the night of Sept. 13 at Precinct, 70 Union Square, Somerville, Mass. Authors will include Andre Dubus III, Anita Shreve, Tom Perotta, Suzanne Strempek Shea (faculty), who will be part of a VIP reception, and music will be by Amy Correia. For details on tickets, check out the poster by clicking here.

OTHER NEWS & CALLS FOR SUBMISSION

Mike Kimball passed along this information: “For those writing plays of any length, from two minutes up, En Avant Playwrights Forums offers comprehensive, up-to-date listing of submission opportunities.”

Many members of the Stonecoast community are deeply concerned about the injustices of our world and want to use writing as a tool for social justice. One goal of the Writing for Social Change Project is to share ideas about literary social change projects both locally and globally. The first step is to collect and share stories about Stonecoast students, faculty, and alumni who are actively using writing to promote social justice. If you’ve been involved in work like this, please send a short (150-200 words) description, including a jpg photo (of you or the activity), and  at least one resource (e.g. book, website) to help others get involved with similar projects. I’m hoping to have these available to post on the Stonecoast website by mid-October. Please end to ellenmeeropol@verizon.net.

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